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19th Century Ship Routes

19th Century Ship Routes | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Ben Schmidt, assistant professor of history at Northeastern University, has visualized the routes of 19th Century ships using publicly available data set from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). The resulting image is a hauntingly beautiful image that outlines the continents and highlights the trade winds. It shows major ports, and even makes a strong visual case for the need for the Panama and Suez Canals."


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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 10, 2014 4:29 PM

Beautiful data visualisation of 19th century ships using publicly available data set from NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 10, 2014 6:21 PM

Lessons in GIS and Medical GIS - Examples of applications. Various Resources at hand.

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Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps

Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
RIO DE JANEIRO — Look at most maps of Rio de Janeiro. The beaches are easy to spot, as are the iconic ocean-front neighborhoods of Copacabana and Ipanema. In the middle is a vast forest.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2013 11:40 AM

A nonprofit organization run by current and former favela residents called Redes da Mare has started the first mapping program to systematically chart out the favelas for municipal governments.  We take for granted what having an address on a named street means in a modern society; it is a portal to public utilities, recognition with businesses and countless other social benefits.  Being left 'off the map' is synonymous with being left behind.  By finding their way on the city maps they are removing some of the social stigma that sought to treat them as if they did not exist.  


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, mapping

Caterin Victor's comment, January 26, 2013 2:06 PM
Even the shanty-towns are beautiful in Brazil
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 3:06 PM

Being left off the map is ludicrous.  It should be surprising how many there are,what they pick for addresses, and population statistics. Hopefully this will also help them to get aid for poverty relief.

 

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Cityscapes of Rio de Janeiro


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Protests in Venezuela


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 26, 2015 1:48 PM

A modern-day Nazi-Venezuela seems to be forming right in front of our eyes.  It's crazy to think that governments in 2015 are still committing horrific crimes against humanity.  These protesters are some of the bravest people in the world, in my opinion.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 13, 2015 12:51 AM

Alot of the things in this video reminded me of the Arab spring, were the internet was shut down, and the military was sent out to abuse and arrest peaceful protesters. I hope that the people of Venezuela never give up. It is after all the majority, the population, that fuels the country!

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 11:33 AM

Wow!  I understand there are two sides to every story and we are just seeing one side here in this video. But its amazing how when a population of people have had enough of political corruption, being treated unfairly by peace keepers, living in poverty while others are living extravagant life styles, some by no fault of their own and want to vent and have exhausted their means of peaceful communications with no one that wants to listen then its captivating how citizens who are on the outside think these people are irrational. This is happening more and more globally even in our own country. People have had enough of being treated unfairly, countries becoming a military state or a police state, corruption by the very government officials who are elected by the people to represent the people. I am not an expert or even know what is happening to cause this protest except for this video but I do know that when people of this magnitude and the people of Syria and the people of the U.S.  including civil rights movement protesters of the 1960s ( oh yeah that's right that was a no cause protest those were people who didn't know what they were talking about they were irrational people because they took to the streets because no one would listen peacefully) then people on the outside should listen. Its sad that protest get out of hand because it takes billions in reparations, it causes unstable governments, causes deaths, and most importantly lack of trust among the citizens and government officials, as well as local officials. This prevents growth via jobs, tourism, etc... so sad...

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Colombia: from failed state to Latin American powerhouse

Colombia: from failed state to Latin American powerhouse | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
In the shadow of a violent and drug-fuelled past, business confidence is growing in Colombia, a country that has been transformed over the past decade

 

Tags: South America, Colombia, development, economic.


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Zach Owen's curator insight, May 6, 2015 8:22 PM

What do you believe sparked this change in economic growth?

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 28, 2015 10:57 AM

It was refreshing to read about Colombia's improving economy and the growth of its middle class, although I am uncertain of how "real" any of this progress really is. Although the article talked up the growth of Colombia's industry and business, raw materials still constitute 72% of its exports as I read in another article, meaning that much remains to be done in terms of investment and diversifying the nation's economy. It was interesting to see how the continent is plagued by many of the same problems- poor infrastructure and government corruption, both the legacy of hundreds of years of colonial domination. It was this combination that allowed for the domination of national politics and the economy by the narcotics trade for much of the late 20th century. For the sake of the Colombian people, I hope that their nation's economy continues to grow, allowing unemployment to fall and the poverty rate to drop. It will be interesting to see how the Chinese recession affects this growth.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, November 16, 2015 1:42 PM

Columbia is well on its way to being a thriving economic powerhouse. They left the past behind with the violent and drugs now transformed by bringing businesses in and integrate western technologies. It shows that any country can rebuild and change itself if it has the potential and remove the on going problems that is bringing the country down.  Progress happens slowly and when it down it will take off toward a new direction.

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Shifting post-colonial economic geographies

Shifting post-colonial economic geographies | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Changes in relationships can be hard to take. The economic bond between Latin America and Spain, its biggest former colonial power, is shifting as the region’s economies mature. Despite some ruffled feathers, the evolution is positive.  After two decades in which Spain amassed assets worth €145 billion ($200 billion) in Latin America, last year was the first in which Latin American companies spent more on acquiring their Spanish counterparts than the other way around."


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2015 2:36 PM

This article shows that the former Spanish "New World" colonies are becoming equal with their former motherland.  Spain now relies on relationships with Latin and South America because the economic downturn of the mid-2000s hurt Spain much worse than it hit the United States.  However, some Spanish still view themselves as superior to the South Americans, and their is still resentment of Spain in countries such as Panama, because the leaders claim that the Spanish still think of them as primitive natives, referring to the region's Mayan pasts, in a pre-Columbian world.  Yet, for the most part the relationship is beneficial and it is actually helping Spain out greatly, as these former colonies are now investing into the country.  Today, Spanish young people are even going to South and Central America in search of work because of the current economic stagnation in Spain.  This shows how things can change greatly overtime, and that yesterdays imperialist power, can now be in need of help from its former subjects.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 27, 2015 8:02 PM
This phenomenon is interesting. Mainly due to the fact that in the past the Spaniards have been quoted as describing native Latin-Americans as "backwards", "barbaric", and "savages". It's funny how some people can be made to eat their own words.
Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:51 AM

This article provides an interesting story about the shift in economic power from colonizer (Spain) to colonized (Latin America). Of course, colonialism in the sense that many of us think of it has not truly existed for a century or so. But that doesn't mean that its effects can't still be felt around the world. Many former colonies are still economically dependent on their former colonizers and are still feeling the adverse effects of (in some cases) rapid decolonization. In some instances, however, economic, and in some sense, political power has shifted to the former colonies. This certainly seems to be the case with Latin America and its former biggest colonizer, Spain. As the numbers show, the flow of investment and goods between the two countries has reversed over the last two decades or so, with Latin America now pouring more money into Spain than the reverse. 

 

What this has created is a sort of paradigm shift not only in an economic sense, but a geographic one as well. Where Europe and the U.S. were once major economic powerhouses on the global stage, now nations in Latin America and other developing countries around the world are seeing a gain in economic power. The availability of resources, large labor markets, and industrialization have allowed these countries to strengthen their economies and engage in foreign trade and investment that they were previously locked out of. As a result, developed nations such as China and the U.S. are now forced to recognize that developing nations half a world away are potential competitors when it comes to trade and investment. That this could mean a geographic shift in the centers of economic power in the coming decades is certainly possible, and something which the wealthiest and most developed countries around the world will surely monitor with great interest. 

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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

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How to Make Maps and Influence People

Maps are one of the most trusted forms of communication – which makes them a great for getting your point across. A look at the dark art of cartographic persuasion.
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A mean-spirited immigration bill in North Carolina - The Hill (blog)

A mean-spirited immigration bill in North Carolina - The Hill (blog) | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The governor should veto a bill that restricts form of ID and takes aim at "sanctuary cities."
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5 immigration myths debunked in (just over) 5 minutes

(Language warning:) (Immigrant) Gavin McInnes of TheRebel.media: "Now that there are thousands of fake Syrian refugees buzzing around the planet, we have ...
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Map shows history of US immigration - Business Insider

Map shows history of US immigration - Business Insider | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
VIDEO: All but 2% of Americans are descendants of foreigners.
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The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica

The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Understanding global trade and economic data can feel overwhelming, but fortunately there are online tools that help us to visualize complex economic data. The data in these charts was incredibly easy to gather, thanks to the Atlas of Economic Complexity."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2015 3:12 PM

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tagsindustry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 12:10 PM

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tags: industry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

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Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach

Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
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Favela Images

Favela Images | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:48 AM

These images of the favelas are both breathtaking and heartbreaking. Breathtaking in the sense that these aerial images show the scale of the entire neighborhood. You begin to get an appreciation for how large these favelas actually are. The amount of people living in this area is remarkable. The image is also extremely heartbreaking. I can only imagine the everyday problems and issue that the residents of these slums face. In the nations so called festive city, I see little reason for these people to celebrate. These are the forgotten people of the brazilin economic boom. They are the ones who the government would not like anyone to know about. Sadness and aw some up my reaction to this photo.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:57 AM
Just seeing images like this make me feel sad that there are people out there living the way they do. Favelas can be defined as the "slums" or ghettos. Favelas are built on hillsides and they tend to have very poor history with the police. Since the favelas are considered to be the slum area, the government provides very little assistance, and if you were to visit the favelas, you could find for example some very poor and dangerous wiring from the local people wire-tapping.
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:42 PM

This is an incredible favela village in South America. It shows how densely the population of slums are and how they are built up on the hillside. Most favelas are built on the side if the hills which are the most unstable portions because they can't afford to have a better place in the valley and away from the mudslide and avalanche areas. Great depiction of the slums.

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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.

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The two Mexicos

The two Mexicos | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"With its combination of modernity and poverty, Mexico provides lessons for all emerging markets."


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 7:56 AM

Mexico is nation with many economic advantages. The problem is the nation has yet to formalize its economic system. An economy based around peddling and privateers can not compete with the economy's of the industrialized world. In order to bridge the gap between modernity and poverty, Mexico must impalement  regulations and laws that are designed to formalize the nations economy. Though in its current state, the Mexican government does not have the trust of the people. Governments often exist on trust. People institute a government for the safety of their property and themselves. What good is a government that can not provide basic protection to its citizens? The government must establish a sense of trust and safety within Mexico.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:05 PM

Many of the "lessons" highlighted in this article apply to all countries. As i was reading this i was thinking about the many  inequalities in America. We like to pride ourselves as the "Greates Country in the World", after all we are the richest country. Just like Mexico though, we too have two faces. I think we may just be better at hiding the one that is uglier.

"The number of people living in high-poverty areas—defined as census tracts where 40 percent or more of families have income levels below the federal poverty threshold—nearly doubled between 2000 and 2013, to 13.8 million from 7.2 million, according to a new analysis of census data by Paul Jargowsky, a public-policy professor at Rutgers University-Camden and a fellow at The Century Foundation. That’s the highest number of Americans living in high-poverty neighborhoods ever recorded."http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/08/more-americans-are-living-in-slums/400832/

We too have slums and they are growing. We may be called to "welfare state" but people don't understand the stipulations of our current welfare programs. The cash assistance program only allows people to utilize it for a maximum of two years over a life time. Also, the amount they receive keeps them a poverty levels.We love to focus on our booming economies, our white picket fences, and the neighbor hoods whove been reformed by gentrification, but we have millions suffering in poor living conditions with high crime rates.The author of this article wirtes "Mexico has failed to bridge the gap between a globalized minority and a majority that lives in what the prsident admits is backwardness and poverty" We have too.

 

The third lesson is to bring the informal economy into light, well i think we could benefit from doing that too. America's has a huge informal sex trafficking, drug selling, illegal immigrant hiring economy. http://monthlyreview.org/2006/07/01/harder-times-undocumented-workers-and-the-u-s-informal-economy/

 

and in regards to how "Violent drug related crime" Here in America we do rate number one in one thing... gun massacres..Go US!! http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/27/health/u-s-most-mass-shootings/

 

I don't have the solutions to any of these issues but what i can say is that Mexico is not alone!

 

Patty B's curator insight, October 19, 2015 2:15 PM

This article highlights the differences seen between social and economic classes in Mexico. It highlights the fact that, despite Mexico's recent economic achievements, roughly half of the country still lives in poverty. The way things are in parts of Mexico is exemplified by images we have seen of favelas set up on dangerous, cheap plots of land directly next to busy, thriving tourist destinations. There is a large gap between rich and poor in Mexico. The poor, like in many countries, make up a majority of Mexico's population yet their well-being isn't being accounted for. Urban areas in Mexico are dangerous. This is holding Mexico back because it deters people from leaving the countrysides in pursuit of the economic gains that can most certainly be made when living in an urban environment. Mexico's economy is at a standstill as a result. Like in many poorer areas around the world, crime pays more than operating within the confines of society. 

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Violence escalates in divided Venezuela

Violence escalates in divided Venezuela | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
CARACAS (Reuters) - Venezuelan security forces and demonstrators faced off in streets blocked by burning barricades in several cities on Thursday in an escalation of protests against President Nicolas

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 2015 1:36 PM

Violent government protesting is on the rise and its mostly led by students. The citizens of Venezuela are protesting the socialist government, led by president Nicolas Maduro. Since his election in April 2013 he has been blamed for violent crime, high inflation, product shortages and repression of opponents, like a dictatorship.  protesting has escalated causing Venezuelan security forces to create burning barricades in the streets. over the last week there has been 5 recorded deaths.

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 28, 2015 11:15 AM

I remember first reading about the Venezuelan riots while taking a course in Latin American history, and it saddens me to see the violence taking place in Caracas and in other urban areas. However, the demonstrations continuing to be made by students in the face of violence from their government is incredibly inspiring. These educated young men and women are dying for the simple right to be governed fairly and responsibly within the framework of a larger democratic society; I say "simple" in the sense that this is something I take for granted everyday. However, the history of the world has shown that achieving this standard of living is anything but simple, and Venezuela's government crackdown is just the latest on a lengthy list of such conflicts between a government and its own people. My heart goes out to those rebelling against the current system, one where those in power cling to power in any means possible in order to continue the corruption that brings them so much wealth. What these students are fighting for is admirable, and I hope that the government hears their voices and realizes that it is fighting a lost cost. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:53 PM

if this was going on in the us there would be pretty constant gun battles in every street. it seems to me that if the people in this country are opposed to their government and the government is insistent that nothing be done then the country is going to go even more to hell then Venezuela already has.

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A Fight to Save One of Latin America's Oldest Neighborhoods

A Fight to Save One of Latin America's Oldest Neighborhoods | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
In Panama City, a plan to build a marine viaduct around a colonial-era neighborhood has residents up in arms...

 

Urban preservation, the historical geography of communities and the cultural character of the urban environment are themes that are deeply embedded in this quick yet potent article by geographer, Thomas Sigler. 


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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 12, 2014 11:34 PM

This is an issue that citizens and governments struggle with all around the world.  Spots like this one, which is "the oldest continuously inhabited European settlement on the Pacific coast of the Americas", are treasured by residents, citizens, and tourists alike.  But when does a historical area need to adapt to growing populations (and therefore increasingly congested streets)?  Or should they at all?  Projects like these take a lot of time, effort, and money to complete.  When visual reminders of local history are taken away, it risks the chance of the knowledge of  the history being lost as well.  The funny thing is, this development is felt to be necessary in order to better accommodate large influxes of tourists which are attracted to this historical site, which if the development takes place, may ruin the charm of the neighborhood; it is a viscous cycle.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 2:23 PM

The preservation of this neighborhood is important for one's sense of place.  The marine viaduct would take away for the history that is embedded in Panama City. While a viaduct would be incredibly useful and profitable, i understand why residents would be concerned.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:23 PM

Just from looking at this picture, this doesn't really look like a bad neighborhood to live in, despite it being one of the oldest in Latin America. They wish to turn the old neighborhood into a highway with six lands of traffic. The neighborhood was founded back in 1673 by the Spanish Crown. It is described as a charming colonial-era World Heritage Site and as previously stated, the oldest European settlement on the Pacific coast. The cobblestone streets, Spanish colonial architecture and majestic plazas have earned a considerable amount of international acclaim in the past 10 years, attracting tourists. Back and forth the debate goes about whether or not to demolish this neighborhood. A neighborhood resident and real estate agent has been fighting against the project. She got a group together and so far they have been successful at protesting and even meeting with the President to voice their opinion. At the moment, it is unclear at what the outcome will be.

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Proportion of Catholics in Latin America has dropped 25% since 1970

Proportion of Catholics in Latin America has dropped 25% since 1970 | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"A new report released by the Pew Research Centre has found that the proportion of Catholics in Latin America has dropped 25% since 1970. One of the primary drivers for the rise in the numbers leaving the Catholic Church? Conversion to Protestantism."


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 2015 5:00 PM

I've watched Passion of the Christ and one thing that I've learned was that the language that was spoken in Jerusalem was Latin. Regardless of whether someone was raised Catholic or Protestant, they still practiced the Christianity faith. Also based on one scoop that I looked up, Christianity was spread overseas from Europe to Latin America (South America).

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 2015 7:11 PM

This article was interesting to read because it shows a different aspect of Latin America and touches on religion. It states that the portion of the area that is Catholic has dropped 25% since 1970 because the Protestant percentage has gone up and reached 19%. The reason that the Protestant percentage has risen is because many of those individuals have converted when the majority of them have been raised Catholic. These individuals all have different reasons as to why they converted over but this jump is more recent and continues to grow. 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:45 PM

The rate of people who religiously identify as Catholics has decreased sharply in the last forty years. In Latin America, where majority of population exhibit strong beliefs in Catholicism, citizens are rapidly shifting to different religions such as Protestant, or denouncing their religion all together. New generations are skeptical to believe in God. However, the new century has also brought about different issues, where practicing Catholics are reportedly victims of sexual abuse, sometimes by their parish priest. Furthermore, younger generations are more open minded and accepting of controversial topics such as gay marriage, homosexuality, and lesbianism. Demographic patterns have shifted these large communities and suffered a decrease of numbers equal to approximately 20%. With new innovations, technologies, and different patterns of living, the Catholic Church is being overlooked by more communities as a preferred religion.

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Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor

Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Based on the Gini coefficient, a measure that captures the level of income distribution in a given area, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the 20 metropolitan areas with the most uneven income distribution, or the highest Gini coefficients. A Gini coefficient of 1 means all income belongs to a single individual, while a coefficient of 0 reflects a perfectly even distribution. The Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut, metro area leads the nation with the worst income distribution.With only a few exceptions, the metro areas with the widest gaps between rich and poor residents tend to have lower median household incomes. The majority of the 20 metro areas with the highest Gini coefficients have median household incomes more than $10,000 below the national median of $52,250.Average incomes, however, tell a different story. Because of the uneven income distribution, the average income is much higher in most of these metro areas.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 13, 2015 8:48 AM

The Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit in 2013).  This article explains the value of the Gini coefficient without delving much into the statistics.  


Tagsstatistics, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic, development, economic.

Chelsea Martines's curator insight, August 29, 2015 2:21 PM

The article discusses the gaps between high income families and low income families in cities. This is mesured by what is called Gini coefficient and look so at a city's amount of poverty and wealthy people. The average income of a city is different and does not tell the imbalance between the high and low income families. It makes a city with a big divider in the two extremes not noticeable because ito makes the city look all around wealthy because of the weight of the higher income people. The Gini coefficient is different and shows that either there is a large majority of families that are wealthy in a city or of low income. Statistics for this have risen over the past decade dramatically since 2007. 

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Crossings Trigger Anti-Immigration Rallies - WSJ

Crossings Trigger Anti-Immigration Rallies - WSJ | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The influx of thousands of Central Americans into the U.S. has energized anti-illegal immigration activists who organized rallies across the country in recent days.

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Michael Cantatore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:41 PM

This article is about how immigrants are taking our jobs. Also that we cant take care of another country's poverty.also about anti - immagration rallies . this article will count toward my 5 news articles

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America's Immigration History

A TDC original documentary explaining the history of immigration to America, from the "Natives" who first populated the land, through the Mexican migrants who ...
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national parks - National Geographic Education

national parks - National Geographic Education | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
This collection contains a selection of content from NG Education about national parks. Use search to find more.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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The Top Language Spoken Globally in 2050 Will Be...

The Top Language Spoken Globally in 2050 Will Be... | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"French is currently ranked sixth among world languages, after Mandarin Chinese, English, Spanish, Hindi and Arabic. But it is gaining speakers quickly and, the study reports, will be spoken by 750 million in 2050, up from 220 million today. A demographic boom in French-speaking African states could bump the percentage of global French speakers from 3 percent to 8 percent by 2050, but some skeptics think the predictions are overrated."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 25, 2015 8:08 AM

I can't verify the projections in the article, but the thought exercise is a great exploration into future global geographies. As some populations are shrinking, others and still growing very quickly and it is clear that the future has the distinct possibility that the linguistic composition of the world might be very different from today.  


Questions to Ponder: Considering current trends, what do you think the world will be like in the future?  What will be better?  What will be worse? 


Tags: language, culture, demographics

Treathyl Fox's curator insight, October 13, 2015 7:57 PM

"A boom in these African states could bump the percentage of global French speakers from 3 percent to 8 percent by 2050."  You don't say?  So glad to know the French language might get in the driver's seat for most spoken world language. Love the language.  Resided in Maryland USA from 1988 to 1995 and there was a school there that taught the children in French. At the time it seemed odd. But guess the educators were thinking ahead! Score!

The Language Ctr's curator insight, October 17, 2015 11:17 AM

Just count the people in China and you have an idea why their language is the top language spoken. However, English of course is known worldwide as the language of business. #languages 

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Adventures in No Man's Land - BBC News

Adventures in No Man's Land - BBC News | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The men travelling across Europe and North Africa in search of places that no-one can claim as their own.
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