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Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale

Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A geographer and a biologist at Salem State University team up to curate a new exhibition, featuring confounding views from both satellites and microscopes

Via Seth Dixon
Dean Haakenson's insight:

So cool!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 17, 2013 11:02 AM

When I teach why scale is an important concept in geography, I say that depending on the situation a scientist might need a microscope or a telescope to properly understand a phenomenon.  Most images give us enough context clues to help us determine the scale of the image, but this set of 15 images does not.  So is it micro or macro?


Tags: scale, perspective

Siri Anderson's curator insight, October 18, 2013 9:46 AM

Gives a whole new meaning to the sense of scale.

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 3:18 PM

Try your eyes at this!

Haak's APHG
Page for My AP Human Geography Course
Curated by Dean Haakenson
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Free online resources for secondary schools - University of Queensland Mobile

Free online resources for secondary schools - University of Queensland Mobile | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Links to free resources for secondary school students including websites, databases and ebooks, provided by the UQL Cyberschool

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dilaycock's curator insight, June 4, 8:29 PM

via @Judy O'RourkeGreat resources from Uni Qld. Scroll down to Social Sciences and expand to access 'Geography.' Topics include: Responding to natural hazards, Sustaining communities, Living with climate change, Feeding the world's people, Local area, and General Geography. 

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The Human Imprint

The Human Imprint | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A Human Geography Resource; Especially for Teachers

 

The Human Imprint is home to everything Human Geography related for the student, educator, and the every day Joe/Jane. This site includes geographic related stories, lesson plans, and other links that bring us closer to understanding the “why of where.”


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson, Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 10:54 AM

Have you already seen this resource produced by a Chicago AP Human Geography teacher?  If not, there's no time like the present!

Melanie Kirchhof's curator insight, March 9, 8:25 AM

Resource for geography teachers

SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 4:58 AM

Words leading to new Geography treads.

good for up to date articles.

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Mapping Monday: 9 Ways to Use State Maps in School

Mapping Monday: 9 Ways to Use State Maps in School | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
This blog was written by Livia Mazur, a Mapping Specialist at National Geographic’s Center for Geo-Education.   Have you ever seen a map and marveled over all of the information that it contai...
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Great Stuff.

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A closer look at communities thriving in unexpected places | TED Blog

A closer look at communities thriving in unexpected places | TED Blog | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
In Iwan Baan's TED Talk, he shows 154 images in rapid succession. Here, he lets you spend more time with them, and appreciate the detail.
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Very interesting where people can live!

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15 Famous Landmarks Zoomed Out Tell a Bigger Story

15 Famous Landmarks Zoomed Out Tell a Bigger Story | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Context is everything.
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Interesting on how scale can change the story that many countries try to tell. This is a great example of human impacts due to population and the interplay of population and economics.

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Global food security: could wheat feed the world?

Global food security: could wheat feed the world? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Donors, businesses and research groups have united to pledge to boost wheat yields by 50% in the next 20 years. Rob Dawson explains why and how (RT @cgiarclimate: Global food security: could wheat feed the world?

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diana buja's curator insight, April 7, 11:27 PM

Who is goihg to do the distributional marketing...? 

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How architectural innovations migrate across borders

"As the world's cities undergo explosive growth, inequality is intensifying. Wealthy neighborhoods and impoverished slums grow side by side, the gap between them widening. In this eye-opening talk, architect Teddy Cruz asks us to rethink urban development from the bottom up. Sharing lessons from the slums of Tijuana, Cruz explores the creative intelligence of the city's residents and offers a fresh perspective on what we can learn from places of scarcity."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 4:41 AM

As a geographer native to the San Diego region with family on both sides of the border, I found this TED talk very compelling personally, but also rich in geographic themes (city planning, diffusion, governance of space, socioeconomic differences in land use patterns, etc.).  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  San Diego and Tijuana have more to offer each other than economic markets--the ideas born out of distinct socioeconomic and political contexts can be just what is needed on the other side of the border.


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, sprawlneighborhood, borders. planning, urban ecology, densityplanning, TED

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7 parts of Russia that other countries could call theirs

7 parts of Russia that other countries could call theirs | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
If Crimea ‘historically’ belongs to Russia, these other regions ‘historically’ don’t.


The rise and fall of empires, two World Wars and the collapse of the Soviet Union mean the map of Europe has been redrawn more times than Russian President Vladimir Putin has posed shirtless. And anyone who claims they owned anywhere first would, if they were being entirely honest, probably have to admit that someone else got there before them.

That was Putin’s logic for the Russian annexation of Crimea. It used to be ours. Therefore it always was, therefore it still is.

Well, by the same token, several other countries could take bites out of Russia. The world’s largest country didn’t start off that way. Just like every other empire, it invaded, conquered, negotiated and seized the lands it now calls its own.

Some of those lands are fiercely disputed to this day, some are the subjects of uneasy settlements, and some have long ago been relinquished to Russia’s unchallenged control. But here’s a list of the most important Russian territories that other countries could, if they chose, try to claim back.



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Mr. Gresham's curator insight, April 11, 5:49 AM

Examples of irredentism?

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When geography matters: George Will - The Oregonian

When geography matters: George Will - The Oregonian | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
When geography matters: George Will
The Oregonian
Geography need not be destiny, but it matters, as Ukraine is being reminded.
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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 25, 3:42 PM

Pointed out in the latest report on Construction Industry 

Trends by Accenture, the rise of the Megacities will empower construction whilst raising many environmental and health problems.

Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 1:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

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Not dead yet: The American shopping mall is changing, not going away

Not dead yet: The American shopping mall is changing, not going away | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
J.C. Penny in peril, Sears is sinking. Is this the end of the American shopping mall?

 

Last Friday sandwich chain Quiznos filed for bankruptcy protection citing high debt loads and heavy completion. Coming just days after a similar filing from pizza chain Sbarro, Quiznos’ bankruptcy was the second half of a one-two gut punch for shopping malls at a time when they’ve never been more vulnerable. A decade ago there were more than 1,100 enclosed shopping malls in the U.S. Since then more than 400 have  either been “re-purposed” or closed outright. No new malls have been completed since at least 2009.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 4, 5:03 AM

While all malls aren't dead, this chilling photo gallery of abandoned malls in a fascinating landscape portrayal of economic over-reach. 

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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 1:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 7:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

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Circles of Latitude Craft

"Hands-on worksheet to play and review the circles of latitude from the Wise Nest."  


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 27, 11:11 AM

I originally found this hands-on activity on Maps 101 wanted to make my own.   This is a fun way to make latitude more meaningful and memorable.  All the documents you need to recreate this, and to have your students make their own are available here


TagsfunartK12.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, March 28, 4:28 PM

Easy to play with

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 30, 7:08 AM

http://thewisenest.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Latitude-Circles-Interactive-Lines-WN.pdf

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Disruptive Demographics

Disruptive Demographics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Last night I had the pleasure of attending a tremendously entertaining and incredibly informative professional development evening at the APHG reading (that isn’t an easy combination to pull of either, and he did marvelously). Dr. James Johnson is a trained geographer teaching in the School of Business at the University of North Carolina.  His talk, entitled “Disruptive Demographics: Implications for Global Competitiveness” (PDF file available here) follows in a tradition of superb presentation at the reading; in 2012, Roger Downs gave a great professional development presentation on geographic expertise.

 


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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, June 3, 6:45 PM
great overview of America's changing demographics!
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Mapping Poverty in America

Mapping Poverty in America | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Data from the Census Bureau show where the poor live.
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Zoom-able down to neighborhood level data! Really great to explore poverty and Scale.

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Q&A: Renée C. Byer’s Living on a Dollar A Day | PROOF

Q&A: Renée C. Byer’s Living on a Dollar A Day | PROOF | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
"I think of myself as a journalist who chooses the art of photography to bring awareness to the world. Art is a powerful means of expression, but combined with
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This brings poverty right into your wheelhouse.

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A giant art installation targets predator drone operators

A giant art installation targets predator drone operators | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
In military slang, Predator drone operators often refer to kills as 'bug splats’, since viewing the body through a grainy video image gives the sense of an insect being crushed. To challenge this i...

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Wow. Now that changes the perspective a bit...

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, April 7, 2:22 PM

The installation is designed to be captured by satellites in order to make it a permanent part of the landscape on online mapping sites.

The project is a collaboration of artists who made use of the French artist JR’s ‘Inside Out’ movement. Reprieve/Foundation for Fundamental Rights helped launch the effort which has been released with the hashtag #NotABugSplat

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 10, 9:56 AM

While it is important to use drone strikes to hit hard to reach targets, collateral damage is a real consequence of bombs and missiles no matter how "smart" they are. This is an ingenious way to get into the psyche of the drone operator. Enemy or not, these are human beings being killed and the side effect of these strikes is that sometimes innocents may be killed or wounded. Interestingly enough however, this can aid the enemy being targeted because when it comes to striking - timing is key and by making the operator think twice or making him or her doubt their ability, it almost a way of psychological warfare. 

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Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe'

Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe' | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"A state commission working on a much-discussed report titled 'Foundations of State Cultural Politics' will release their findings in two weeks, presidential advisor Vladimir Tolstoi announced last week, adding that the basic formula of the report could be summarized as 'Russia is not Europe.'"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 7:17 PM

At times Russia has sought to be perceived as a part of Europe only to be excluded in the minds (and institutions) of Western Europe.  Now, in a discursive way to protect itself, it is reaffirming and building a cultural buffer zone between Europe and Russia.  What are the borders of Europe as you think of it?  Can world regions change over time?  Any examples of regions having their borders redrawn?  


Tags: RussiaEurope, regions.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 9:46 PM

Russia is usually associated with Europe but not Western Europe but there is a push to separate Russia from Europe.

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Portraits of Reconciliation

Portraits of Reconciliation | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, these perpetrators and survivors are standing for forgiveness.

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diana buja's curator insight, April 7, 11:23 PM

Yesterday was a national holiday here in Burundi, commemorating the shooting down of the plane containing the presidents of Burundi and Rwanda, and the beginning of the awful genocide in Rwanda.  I was in Nairobi at the time, and have graphic visions of what took place, which I will blog about this week.

Paige Therien's curator insight, April 11, 10:14 AM

These pictures and the stories behind them are very emotional.  The Rwandan Genocide was made possible by powerful propaganda which further pushed Hutu and Tutsi interests and perceptions of one another to opposite extremes.  As they are all Rwandans who live amongst each other, the genocide spread like wildfire from within and turned the country on its head.  I think the fact that victim/forgivers and perpetrators can stand side by side and be civil is very important. It shows the persistence of humanity to work together in reciprocal relationships and the importance of a "clear conscience" when doing so.  This project of reconciliation fosters support for those who lost so much, as well as unity through communication.  When these people are compared with the United States, I think it is very telling of the United State's moral and ethical character; the lack of political and economic interests in Rwanda was their reasoning behind our country not getting involved.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:35 PM

Rwanda is a genocide that many people don't even know about. Regardless of whether someones heard of it, they should still be aware of how people have lived their lives from that time. Some looking to forgive the people who did this, and others looking to gain forgiveness from those they hurt.

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Newbie Urban Gardeners May Not Be Aware Of Soil's Dirty Legacy

Newbie Urban Gardeners May Not Be Aware Of Soil's Dirty Legacy | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
More and more city dwellers are trying their hand at urban gardening. Most know to be wary of lead in their soil, a report finds, but they're clueless about how to avoid other types of contaminants.
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1984 in 2014

1984 in 2014 | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The pen, but also the sword FIREWORKS, concerts, uplifting speeches and patriotic euphoria: the Kremlin is celebrating the annexation of Crimea as though Russia had...
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This really highlights some of the parallels with the cold war.

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How scary is Putin’s Russia compared to the Soviet Union? This chart has some answers

How scary is Putin’s Russia compared to the Soviet Union? This chart has some answers | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Russia is a diminished power. (RT @ramosclass: How scary is Putin's Russia vs the USSR, really?
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Great comparison.

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Seeing Equinoxes and Solstices from Space

From the Smithsonian Magazine: "

Today, March 20, is the vernal equinox, the official start of spring. (Or, in the southern hemisphere, autumn. Sorry.)  We celebrate two main sets of holidays pegged to the orientation of the Earth vis-à-vis the Sun—the “equinoxes” and the “solstices.” A few years ago the team at NASA's Earth Observatory used observations from a EUMETSAT meteorological satellite to make the video above, which shows what the solstices and equinoxes look like from space.

On the equinoxes, like the spring equinox today or the fall equinox in September, the length of the day and night are as close as they'll get. The northern hemisphere's summer solstice, in June, is the day with the most hours of sunlight. The winter solstice, in December, has the least daylight. All of it has to do with the fact that the Earth's rotation axis is tilted 23.5 degrees relative to the orbit we take as we circle the Sun.

For those inclined towards exploring Earth-Sun interactions, playing around with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Sun Simulator is a fun way to make a little more sense of the various factors that control how the Sun appears in the sky.


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Take Me Home, Mother Russia

Take Me Home, Mother Russia | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
10 places that would welcome a Putin landgrab, and 10 parts of Russia that want the hell out.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 21, 10:01 AM

One of the ideological weaknesses in the idea that Russia should annex Crimea because of the large number of ethnic Russians that want to join the Russian Federation, is that there are many places within the Russian Federation without a majority of ethnic Russians that would want out of the Russian Federation.  This list from Foreign Policy is pretty intriguing and they provide insight about the geographic context for each place on the list.

Top 10 looking for a way into Russia (abbreviated)

  1. Transnistria
  2. Donbass
  3. New Russia
  4. Abkhazia
  5. South Ossetia
  6. Belarus
  7. Northern Kazakhstan
  8. Russians in the Baltic
  9. Nagorno Karabakh
  10. Brighton Reach, Brooklyn


Top 10 look for a way out of Russia:

  1. Chechnya
  2. Tatarstan
  3. Idel-Ural
  4. Kalmykia
  5. Kaliningrad
  6. Karelia
  7. Komi Republic
  8. Circassia
  9. Karachay-Balkaria
  10. Birobizhan
Kevin Barker's curator insight, March 22, 7:03 AM

For every argument to aquire land based on ethnic boundaries, there is at least one that would argue land should be lost. This would apply to essentially any country in the world. 

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 7:57 AM

In the recent light of the Crimea annexation and following conflict, many are questioning what Russia's next move will be and how this region may change in the future.  The former USSR encomassed a huge amount of land, and therefore many different ethnic groups.  Of course this has always been a problem, and this article illustrates how it probably always will be a problem.  As politics and cultures in different countries change, people will favor either secession or affiliation due to these centripetal or centrifugal forces .  While some may be far-fetched (Siberia and Brooklyn), it is important to remember that as long as there are some people who are in favor, there may be conflict at same scale.

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Urban Morphology in Mexico City

Urban Morphology in Mexico City | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Mexico City is a giant laboratory of urban morphology. Its 20 million residents live in neighborhoods based on a wide spectrum of plans.  The colonial center (above) was built on the foundations of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. The old city was on an island in Lake Texcoco. The lake was drained to prevent flooding as the city expanded.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 27, 9:57 AM

I've conducted research in Mexico City, and am endlessly fascinated but this urban amalgamation.  The city is so extensive that there are numerous morphological patterns that can be seen in the city, including the 12 listed in the article.  


Tags: Mexico, density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 9, 12:48 PM

unit 7