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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.

Via Seth Dixon
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:14 PM

It is sad to see the many different ways the poverty stricken and uneducated regions of the world are exploited, especially the children. Nepal is so poor that most of the recruiters for the predatory foreign networks are often locals who either take their relatives or abductees sent back to find a replacement. The animation helps add clarity and approachability to a bleak and difficult topic.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:33 AM

It's heartbreaking to see the plight children living in other parts of the globe, making me all the more appreciative of my uneventful upbringing in the US. Child labor is a practice that many Americans associate with the 19th century, but it continues to be widespread in many parts of the world, as is the case in Nepal. Educational opportunities are few and far in between for many Nepalese, who's short-term financial struggles rob their children of long-term opportunities for success. Many are kidnapped from their homes, or sold by their families to pay off debt with skyrocketing interest rates. The same also holds true for young female sex workers, who suffer an enormous amount of physical and psychological harm at the hands of their kidnappers and their clients. Economic pitfalls and a lack of access to education helps to perpetuate this cycle of abuse, as people are unaware of their rights in addition to lacking the education to advance economically in their societies. The Nepalese national government and several international rights groups are hard at work to combat these harmful practices, but they are fighting an uphill battle against an illicit institution that has ingrained itself in Nepalese society and culture. Great strides are being made, but much still has to be done for the youth of Nepal.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:22 AM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


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Gamification In Education Stats | LearnDash

Gamification In Education Stats | LearnDash | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
#Gamification in #Education Stats - https://t.co/VoEp3aneLu via @learndashlms https://t.co/nrCwr9ACUg
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#Gamification for an improved learning experience: a visual guide (by @AndoniSanz) - e-Learning Feeds

#Gamification for an improved learning experience: a visual guide (by @AndoniSanz) - e-Learning Feeds | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
http://www.slideshare.net/andonisanz/gamification-mechanics-in-education-andonisanz
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What are the alternatives if Britain leaves the EU?

What are the alternatives if Britain leaves the EU? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

If Britain votes to leave the EU, what would the options be for our political
and trade relationship with Europe?

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Staking a claim to create a country

Staking a claim to create a country | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Jeremiah Heaton wants a no-man’s-land in east Africa, but international officials say his claim is insufficient.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 1:14 PM

There was once an episode of Family Guy where Peter Griffin establishes his own country when his house is left of a map of Quahog. This story reminds me of that episode, but also raises some questions as to what it takes to be a sovereign nation. Jeremiah Heaton has long term goals of creating an agricultural production center, has been living in area and is willing to put in the work to establish a political identity. Also an extreme example it does show how some nations come to be globally recognized and also how many forces are against new nations being established and recognized.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:33 PM

This man decided to give his daughter a piece of unclaimed territory in Africa for her seventh birthday so that she could be a princess.  Now he wants his country to be recognized by surrounding countries as well as the UN.  Everyone is saying that this is not allowed for various reasons.  He does not have people living there, he is not himself inhabiting the area, other countries are not recognizing his claim, and one cannot simply put a flag in the ground and say that it is theirs.  If this were the case there would be seven billion flags around the world.  He is claiming that he has hopes for this area, turning it into an agricultural center where he can help with food supply issues in the surrounding area.  I see that he has hopes and dreams for the area, but as far as calling it his own country I don't see that going as well as he thinks.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 10:32 AM

Having read through most of the article, I find it funny how he actually believes that he can just step foot on soil and claim it as his own country. The description, “members of the occupying nation must have lived on the land for several years,” and, “it must also demonstrate that it has occupied the space, not that it just physically stepped foot there,” are the best ways to describe why it would never work for him. You have to make use of the space that is provided. Even though he claims that he will, turn the country into an agricultural production center that will tackle food security issues in the region, it hasn’t been done yet, and even if it was he wouldn’t occupy nearly enough of the space. Egypt and Sudan are officially negotiating over the land.

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xkcd: Terminology

xkcd: Terminology | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:14 PM

I use this classic xkcd image every semester that I teach world regional geography.  The explanation of this image is helpful if the students fail to understand the context or the point of this comic strip.  The very idea of 'western' and 'eastern' is very much an idea that comes from 'the west' (Greek and Roman civilizations anciently, and a broadly European more recently). The Euro-centric view of the world from a single 'starting point' is one reason some geographers don't like the term 'Middle East,' but prefer Southwest Asia and North Africa.  The Middle East implies a European starting point as does the Far East.     

 

Tagsregions, perspective.

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Timeline of the Breakup of Yugoslavia

Map animation depicting the break up of Yugoslavia through the series of political upheavals and conflicts that occurred from the early 1990's onwards. Different areas of control are colour coded.

 

Tags: devolution, historical, political, states, borders, political, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia.


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As 2016 dawns, Europe braces for more waves of migrants

As 2016 dawns, Europe braces for more waves of migrants | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Bitter cold, biting winds and rough winter seas have done little to stem the seemingly endless flow of desperate people fleeing war or ...

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Brexit: a referendum on Ireland’s future

Brexit: a referendum on Ireland’s future | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The UK ballot on whether it should withdraw from the EU could take place this year. A decision to leave would change this country more radically than any domestic election

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40 Maps They Didn’t Teach You In School

40 Maps They Didn’t Teach You In School | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

By the time we graduate high school, we learn that they never taught us the most interesting things in there.

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European Union, EU Parliament, EU Affairs, EU News, EU Entrepreneurship. Powered by RebelMouse

European Union, EU Parliament, EU Affairs, EU News, EU Entrepreneurship. Powered by RebelMouse | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

European Union, EU Parliament, EU Affairs, EU News, EU Entrepreneurship.

Collected by @Analyticus
bit.ly/AoyI4q

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Britain is now the 'lowest-cost manufacturing economy of Western Europe'

Britain is now the 'lowest-cost manufacturing economy of Western Europe' | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Stable wages and improved productivity over the past decade made the UK
increasingly competitive even compared to many Eastern European countries

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A fisherman’s plan to feed the world and reduce climate change

A fisherman’s plan to feed the world and reduce climate change | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A new model of ocean farming could revolutionize the seafood industry.
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Bitsbox Giving Teachers Free Coding Kits for CSED Week (Edtech Opportunity) via @EdSurge

Bitsbox Giving Teachers Free Coding Kits for CSED Week (Edtech Opportunity) via @EdSurge | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Bitsbox is donating completely free coding kits to teachers for Computer Science Education Week (December 7th-13th). Each kit is enough for thirty students, and they come with a teacher's guide to help run an Hour of Code.

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Terry Morley's curator insight, November 12, 2015 2:26 PM

Hands on kits fit with our initiative to promote STREAM by having a STREAM Lab

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Gamification In Education Stats | LearnDash

Gamification In Education Stats | LearnDash | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
#Gamification in #Education Stats - https://t.co/VoEp3aneLu via @learndashlms https://t.co/nrCwr9ACUg
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Turkey in spotlight as EU leaders debate refugee crisis

Turkey in spotlight as EU leaders debate refugee crisis | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

No new substantive measures expected to emerge from two-day summit in Brussels

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Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt

Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
On why a Prussian scientific visionary should be studied afresh…In a superb biography, Andrea Wulf makes an inspired case for Alexander von Humboldt to be considered the greatest scientist of the 19th century. Certainly he was the last great polymath in a scientific world which, by the time he died in Berlin in 1859, aged 89, was fast hardening into the narrow specializations that typify science to this day. Yet in the English-speaking world, Humboldt is strangely little-known.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 10, 2015 8:28 AM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here is another article and TED-ED video on the most influential scientist that you might not have heard of (at least until today).

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography.

Tony Burton's curator insight, January 29, 2016 11:32 AM

An interesting biography, but, strangely, Ms Wulf almost completely ignores Humboldt's time in Mexico. In some ways, his time in Mexico was more pivotal in terms of geography than his time in South America. Claiming that Humboldt is a virtual unknown in Europe is a gross distortion of the facts; there have been numerous books about Humboldt over the last thirty to forty years, let alone before that time!.

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 2016 6:25 AM

De nieuwe methode van de onderbouw: (Alexander von) Humboldt

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Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 15, 2015 11:39 AM
A great read
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 6:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.

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Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid

Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"All Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants to do is make the world a better place for his new daughter. While he’s technically on paternity leave, he couldn’t sit idly by as India attempts to halt Internet.org, Facebook’s initiative to provide free but limited internet to the developing world."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 29, 2015 6:02 PM

India is a country with amazing economic potential, but hampered but uneven levels of social development.  The so-called 'digital divide' can exacebate problems for the poor and their ability to join the emerging industries.  In this situation Facebook is offering free (partial) internet access to India's poor and the discussions about net neutrality and the potential ulterior motives are underway.

 

Questions to Ponder: Do you favor Zuckerberg's proposal or do you think that India should reject this offer?  

 

Tagsdevelopment, India, South Asia, infrastructuretechnology.

   

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, January 2, 2016 4:56 AM

Education access in  ALL  countries  has effects when not provided, equally!

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Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 15, 2015 11:39 AM
A great read
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 6:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.

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Why Europe Will Let Member States Opt Out of GM...

Why Europe Will Let Member States Opt Out of GM... | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

In the US, farmers have been cultivating crops with genetically engineered traits since the 1990s and their use – and consumption – is widespread.

That’s not the case in Europe.

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Britain is now the 'lowest-cost manufacturing e...

Britain is now the 'lowest-cost manufacturing e... | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

“Stable wages and improved productivity over the past decade made the UK increasingly competitive even compared to many Eastern European countries (Britain is now the 'lowest-cost manufacturing economy of Western Europe'” | Lean Leadership...

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EU referendum voter turnout campaign recommended by British Future ...

EU referendum voter turnout campaign recommended by British Future ... | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

A neutral campaign group should be set up to boost turnout in the European Union referendum promised by David Cameron, a think tank has recommended. Senior f...

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Our spoiled, emasculated, de‑spiritualised societies in the West are in terminal decline

Our spoiled, emasculated, de‑spiritualised societies in the West are in terminal decline | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

In 2015 we witness a rare geopolitcal power shift - and in the face of every
kind of new external challenge the leaders of the EU and the USA have never
looked weaker or more bemused

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A Perilous Year for European Unity

A Perilous Year for European Unity | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Terror attacks, an unchecked migrant crisis, a fragile economic recovery and Britain’s looming referendum on European Union membership will test the foundations of the bloc’s economic and political integration in 2016.

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Cockfights in the edgelands: the man who walked Mexico City's perimeter

Cockfights in the edgelands: the man who walked Mexico City's perimeter | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
To get a sense of the true size of the megacity, Feike de Jong decided to walk around its entire 800km-long perimeter. In these extracts from his ebook, the experience takes him back to childhood – and confronts him with cockfighting
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