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Could you live on $1.50 a day? Try it with Live Below The Line

Could you live on $1.50 a day? Try it with Live Below The Line | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Our guest blogger today is Justine Lucas, U.S. Campaigns Manager at the Global Poverty Project. Over a billion people on this planet live in extreme poverty.  Yet, for many of us, extreme poverty i...
Dean Haakenson's insight:

So important to really conceptualize this level of poverty. Many students need help understanding issues like this.

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Teaching Geopolitics: Fantasy Football as a Learning Game - Mind/Shift

Teaching Geopolitics: Fantasy Football as a Learning Game - Mind/Shift | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

 "Digital technology made the task easy: rather than sifting through a week’s worth of newspaper clippings for the players’ standings and statistics, he could simply look online. At a glance, he saw where each player stood. Then it came to him: what if he wasn’t swapping Cutler and Brees, but China and Brazil? Just as fantasy football team owners draft, cut, and trade players based on their performance, his students could do the same with countries.

He’d replace passing yards and points per game with political crises and popular uprisings. Since he was struggling to get students interested in international developments, each country’s ability to fight its way into the news of the day would make it more valuable. Students could draft teams of countries—it didn’t matter if they were related—and compete for the newsiest cluster. Lackluster countries would quickly sink to the bottom and get traded, but if an earthquake or military coup struck, say, Indonesia, the student who was following the news most closely could snatch it up before anyone else found out. Nelson dubbed the game Fantasy Geopolitics."


Via John Evans
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Sandra Carswell's curator insight, May 5, 10:13 PM

I like this idea as a way to get our students to follow world news. If we started it with 6th graders studying world geography, perhaps they would continue following the news as they grow older. I will share this with 6th grade social studies teachers as an activity the could have ongoing throughout the year. 

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AP Human Geography Review Material


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 2:44 PM

Over 166,000 students are preparing to take the AP Human Geography test on May 15th.  With that in mind, I went looking for resources so here's what I found.

  • I just discovered this Prezi (embedded above) which is a systemic, unit-by-unit review of major ideas. 
  • Since some reviews don't take into account the 2013 changes, I created this hyperlinked Slideshare presentation to explain the changes. 

Best of luck on the exam!  Have something to add to the list?  Let me know. 


Tags: APHG.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 6, 11:20 AM
its almost here! Don't' forget the list of resources on our course calendar too!
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An Atlas of Upward Mobility Shows Paths Out of Poverty

An Atlas of Upward Mobility Shows Paths Out of Poverty | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A decades-old effort found that moving poor families to better neighborhoods did little to help them. A new look at the data suggests the opposite.
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Globalization and Baltimore - Washington Post

Globalization and Baltimore - Washington Post | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Orioles' COO John Angelos' explanation for the unrest in Baltimore has been widely shared. Is he right?
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Chipotle Says Adios To GMOs, As Food Industry Strips Away Ingredients - NPR (blog)

Chipotle Says Adios To GMOs, As Food Industry Strips Away Ingredients - NPR (blog) | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Chipotle's move is the latest example of the food industry ditching ingredients, as consumers demand a say in what's in their dinner. Some of these ingredients are more questionable than others.
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The Qualitative Formative Assessment Toolkit: Document Learning with Mobile Technology - Edutopia

The Qualitative Formative Assessment Toolkit: Document Learning with Mobile Technology - Edutopia | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
What is qualitative formative assessment? Some call it anecdotal or informal assessment. However, such designations imply passivity -- as if certain things were captured accidentally. I believe the word "formative" should always be included with the word assessment because all feedback mechanisms should help shape and improve the person (or situation) being assessed. Wedging the word "qualitative" into my terminology differentiates it from the analytic or survey-based measures that some associate with the term formative assessment.

For my purposes, qualitative formative assessment is the ongoing awareness, understanding, and support of learning that is difficult or impossible to quantify. An informal observation or the look on a learner's face can inform a teacher about a student's progress, yet such signals are challenging to capture or convey to the relevant agents (i.e., the learner, the teacher, or the parent).

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Jane Reader's curator insight, April 27, 9:43 PM

Using cameras is a great way to start. Need to work on the video aspect and also the sharing and storing.

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Scale taught in Comics

Scale taught in Comics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Such as a simple, powerful comic strip to teach the importance of scale.   If you prefer an image with a 'paper' look to it, try this image of the April 19, 2015 post of Mutts. 


Tags: scale, K12, location, fun.


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isitfinishedyet's curator insight, April 21, 8:00 AM

Great lesson in backgrounds

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 22, 7:16 PM

Scales...

Coco Angus's curator insight, April 28, 5:56 PM

April 19 2015 

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AP Human Geography FRQs

AP Human Geography FRQs | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Based upon student reactions to their multiple choice exams, I can tell that the types of questions are NOT, 'choose the correct definition for the vocabulary term.' Instead, the types of questions are leading towards giving an example of a real world phenomenon and then requesting students to tell which term best applies. And though I have not seen an actual test, it sounds like the kids were saying that the questions require more reading than the answers (I would actually prefer that to the alternative)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 10:46 AM

This article (with the outstanding infographic above) from the Human Imprint is an excellent primer to get students ready for the APHG exam.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.  

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Incredible Satellite Views of the New Islands China Decided to Build for Itself (Video)

Incredible Satellite Views of the New Islands China Decided to Build for Itself (Video) | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Sucking sand off the bottom of the ocean floor and depositing it onto small reefs and shoals, China has been steadily creating new islands in the disputed South China Sea. Satellite images show the progress.
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The Urban Neighborhood Wal-Mart: A Blessing Or A Curse?

The Urban Neighborhood Wal-Mart: A Blessing Or A Curse? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The nation's largest retailer is known for sprawling suburban and rural stores. Now Wal-Mart is moving into city centers — sometimes despite strong local opposition.
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The steep costs of living so far apart from each other

The steep costs of living so far apart from each other | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
In strictly economic terms, sprawl is inefficient. Spread people out, and it takes them longer to drive where they need to go, and it costs them more in gas money to get there. Disperse a few people over a lot of land, and that land is used inefficiently, too. Then give those people roads and sewers — you’d need a lot more of both to serve 20 households living over a square mile than 20 on the same block. And that's to say nothing of the costs of fire and police service when people live far apart.

These costs add up, in both private budgets and public ones. It’s a messy thought exercise to contemplate tallying them, akin to trying to calculate the productivity America wastes by sitting in traffic every year. How do you measure, for instance, the saved health care costs in a community where many people walk for transportation every day? How do you quantify the pleasure gained from a big yard that offsets any of these costs?


Tags: planning, sprawl, scale.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 5, 8:00 PM

Sometimes people choose to live out of the cities for many reasons. First of all, living in suburban  neighborhoods would be more affordable than residing in the cites and people will acquire more square footage, land, and less expensive houses. To be able to live in the city, people have to pay high prices in addition to dealing with the stress of city life. Second, over populated cities can cause damage to the environment through such ways as air pollution and santitation hazards. Taxes will remain high in order to keep up with the urban sprawl and maintain public transportation and education services. Mexico is an example where many over populated cities can be found. These cities suffer from severe air pollution, massive clouds of industrial smoke, and substandard public service programs.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 12:34 PM

APHG- HW Option 6

 

Cass Allan's curator insight, April 16, 9:46 AM

good for urbanisation or liveability

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Syrian Journey: Choose your own route

Syrian Journey: Choose your own route | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Put yourself in the shoes of a Syrian migrant and see whether you could make the right choices on the journey to Europe.

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Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, April 5, 1:37 AM

Ak by ste boli Sýrčanom :(

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 5, 8:01 PM

Citizens of Syria have experienced difficult times since their country entered into a period of continual war in the past few decades. People migrate to Europe in demand of better life for their families. All begin with a plan and a &helper,&  called trafficker or coyote in Mexico, and money to cross few borders and be able to live life free from war. Although, with countries such as Egypt, Lybia, Lebanon, Turkey, and Greece, with a massive migrations, tough economies, lack of jobs, nothing and no one is safe. However, Europe is very attractive in terms of quality life and safety to raise families. Furthermore, to be able to survive during this migration transition, many risks are involved and even in some cases, killings. Immigrants migrate by boat, truck, train, and sometimes even walking. Day or night immigrants keep moving and pay  high prices to be transported to the next point. It takes them weeks, months, and even years to reach thier final destinations. This is the same for those immigrants in Mexico and U.S. 

Claire Law's curator insight, April 25, 8:41 PM

UK interactive resource to put students in the shoes of refugees fleeing conflict

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London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue

London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"London completely dominates the political, cultural and economic life of the U.K. to an extent rarely seen elsewhere. That imbalance has been an issue in the run-up to Thursday's election."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 8:37 AM

The problems with primate cities are hardly unique to London (see here resources for teaching about primate cities using the example of Mexico City).  The lack of a balanced urban hierarchy that we would see in countries where the rank-size rule applies is a political problem as stated in this NPR podcast.  This additional BBC article bemoans Britain’s lack of a true second city, arguing that London’s shadow looms too large for sustained national development outside of the primate city. 


Tags: APHG, urbanunit 7 cities, megacities.

Blake Joseph's curator insight, May 6, 6:02 PM

I remember seeing a road map of the United Kingdom once and wondering why almost every single road eventually seemed to make its way to the massive urban sprawl of London in the country's southeast. Even cities as far away as Inverness in Scotland or Belfast in Northern Ireland seemed to inevitably revolve around the massive capital. Having such a dominance on the country, I can see why other distant communities are gradually losing interest in the political and economic influences London still has on them, especially if other closer urban centers are greatly growing in population and influence. The recent election for Scotland's independence from England shows that even today many people are looking to branch out away from London's reach, and that these reasons are perhaps not totally influenced by historic tensions and rivalries between the two places. Populations centers like Birmingham and Manchester have grown immensely in the last decade, and with that has came a growing independent sense of culture and identity as well. Residents in smaller towns and villages feel that these other closer  urban areas would be a better representative of them in country-wide politics than distant London. Some of these distant communities are nearly 500 miles away from London. That is like Detroit, Michigan being politically and economically dominated by New York City. Even with London being massive in size and influential reach, I can see why far away towns in the U.K. don't always consider London too important.

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Xenophobia in South Africa

Xenophobia in South Africa | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Strained by a high unemployment rate, relations between locals and foreigners have deteriorated into deadly violence.

Via Mr. David Burton
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Why We Can't Take Chipotle's GMO Announcement All That Seriously

Why We Can't Take Chipotle's GMO Announcement All That Seriously | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Chipotle says providing "food with integrity" means dropping genetically modified ingredients. But critics say the company's new policy is inconsistent and even dishonest.
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Is Globalization Finished? - Wall Street Journal (blog)

Is Globalization Finished? - Wall Street Journal (blog) | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
World trade volumes fell in the early months of 2015, once again disappointing the expectations of economists.
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The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts

The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"These seven maps and charts, visualized by The Washington Post, will help you understand how diverse other parts of the world are in terms of languages."

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.


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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 30, 8:15 PM

A site to help students understand how diverse the world is - and particularly, that the English language is not the dominant language in the world! The use of infographics - data presented visually - help students compare languages across the world. 

Simone Percy's curator insight, April 30, 10:56 PM

Good visual to represent the number of people speaking languages around the world.

Maria Yolanda Garcia OLAVE's curator insight, May 2, 4:49 AM
http://www.scoop.it/t/panama-by-maria-yolanda-garcia
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Social Progress Index

Social Progress Index | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The Social Progress Imperative creates a shared language and common goals to align different organizations and achieve greater social impact.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 3:03 PM

I think we all know that we shouldn't judge a country just by it's GDP.  Economic development might be correlated with development and social progress, but the outliers are so telling.  In this TED talk, we learn about a new metric designed to measure how well a society provides opportunities for communal and individual success.  Having lived in Costa Rica for two years, I'm not surprised to find that Costa Rica does much better on this index than it would if we were to use GDP or HDI as a way to measure social progress and quality of life. For a more detailed look at the United States, see Geographies of Opportunity: Ranking well-being by Congressional Districts.        


Questions to Ponder: How is the Social Progress Index similar to and different from the Human Development Index?  What assumptions are built into the system? 


Tags: development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica, mapping.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 25, 8:45 PM

Interactive map showing different categories of social progress

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Gentrification as Adoption?

Gentrification as Adoption? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"OTR A.D.O.P.T. transfers abandoned buildings to qualified new owners at reduced cost.  The catch? You must commit to rehabilitating the property and returning it to productive use. You must also demonstrate an ability to successfully complete such a project.  A.D.O.P.T.-Advancing Derelict and Obsolete Properties Through Transfer."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 3, 2:42 PM

This banner was spotted by Laura Spess, an urban geographer in Cincinnati in during the 2014 APHG reading.   The Over-The-Rhine neighborhood is very close to the reading, and the urban renewal here is quite controversial.  Many point to the economic positives and infusion of investments, while other see social displacement of the poor.  After the reading we were discussing the messages embedded the sign (and the urban landscape).  The OTR ADOPT organization conceptually thought of poorer neighborhoods as orphans and that the gentrification process should be likened to adoption.  While the merits and problems of gentrification can be debated, I find that particular analogy painfully tone deaf and wasn't surprised to find the organizations website, well, derelict and obsolete.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Why might this analogy be problematic?  How might current residents of the community feel about the message? 


Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicAPHG, Cincinnati

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We're all gonna die!

We're all gonna die! | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Yes. It’s true. In the meantime, I’d also like to live. Except, nobody wants to let me live--they all want to remind me of how I’m going to die, or how I’m going to cause my children to die. I was packing my kid’s lunch the other day, and tossed in a Twinkie with a smile and stroke of endearment, when I happened to glance at my kid's class newsletter on the table. It informed me that if I feed my child Twinkies, I might as well be feeding him rocket fuel."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 10:55 PM

I can't agree with everything mentioned in this article, but the overall message something that I do think is worth discussing.  Our society can be swayed by fear and a few statistics to wildly overreact to a situation (Ebola, Y2K, etc.).  So many movies tap into the our societal fears that an over dependence on technology or chemical alterations will destroy humanity (like Terminator, the Matrix, the Net, etc.).  The anti-GMO movement successfully taps into that cultural zeitgeist, and some like 'the Food Babe' stir up fear to the chagrin of many scientists.     

 

Tags: GMOstechnology, agriculture, agribusiness.

asli telli's curator insight, April 15, 12:49 AM

Who's feeding us rocket fuel?

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Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)!

Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)! | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 6:45 PM

This is more for the teachers than the students since this is most certainly not a current pop culture reference.  Still, what's better than an interactive map displaying the locations where Johnny Cash has been while listening to him sing "I've Been Everywhere?"  (Tech support: Use Google Chrome or Safari to play and ignore the finger). 


Tags: music, transportation, mapping, tourism.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:08 PM

It remarkable how a map can illustrate in how many cities Johnny Cash performed in with his band. As a famous musician in the U.S., he targeted different states and his audience was diversity. Music gave him the opportunity to help people of all different ethnicties and social backgrounds. With his first band created in Germany, he continued to take his music around the world and especially in the U.S. His country music was most popular in the 70s and 80s and even now it can still be heard on the radio.

Blake Joseph's curator insight, May 6, 5:06 PM

Musicians have the great privilege of being able to travel to lots of places in the world and being paid to do it. Johnny Cash, Steve Miller Band, and The Allman Brothers are three artist out of many I can think of that have written songs directly pertaining to their love of traveling around. While many other occupations travel immensely as well,  a popular musicians outreach and influence on people makes their traveling stories have a much more inspirational impact on people than say truck drivers or flight attendants.

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Islam is on track to overtake Christianity, and more findings from Pew's religion report

A new study projects that Islam will overtake Christianity by the end of the century.
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China building 'great wall of sand' in South China Sea

China building 'great wall of sand' in South China Sea | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The scale of China's land reclamation in the South China Sea is leading to "serious questions" on its intentions, a top US official says.
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Teach Mideast

Teach Mideast | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"TeachMideast is an educational outreach initiative developed by the Middle East Policy Council. TeachMideast is a resource designed primarily to give high school and community college teachers the foundation they need to teach about critical , complex, and intriguing subjects."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 2, 3:50 PM

After writing an article about cultural empathy and stereotypes for National Geographic Education, I was delighted to hear from the educational outreach coordinator at Teach Mideast.  The amount of resources they have for teachers is impressive--check it out!


Tagsreligion, culturehistorical, political, Middle East.