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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.

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Map Projections

This video describes what map projections are, and how the Earth can be represented using map projections within a GIS.

 

Tags: Mapping, video, map projections, cartography.


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http://www.eurogamez.net/2015/05/download-life-is-strange-episode-3-pc.html
Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 3:14 PM

This video relates to Use of geospatial technologies, such as GIS, remote sensing, global positioning systems (GPS), and online maps. It tells about how the world is a 3D shape, but we view it as 2D, which leads to distortions in world size. The use of GIS allows for the world to be projected onto any shape such as a cone, rectangle, prism, or pyramid. And this leads to the different map projections. 

MsPerry's curator insight, Today, 9:31 AM

Ch 1 Map Projections

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Urban Farmers Say It's Time They Got Their Own Research Farms

Urban Farmers Say It's Time They Got Their Own Research Farms | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The University of the District of Columbia is the one land-grant university in the U.S. with an urban focus. It's fostering studies on growing food in raised beds, hoop houses and shipping containers.
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The History of Cuba-U.S. Relations

The History of Cuba-U.S. Relations | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
One of the last relics of the Cold War ended on December 17, 2014. U.S. President Barack Obama announced a thawing of foreign relations policy between the United States and Cuba.


Tags: Cuba, podcast, Maps 101, historical.


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Shane C Cook's curator insight, Today, 4:26 AM

For decades the United States of America has ceased contact, trade, and political mention with Cuba due to tensions in the Cold War. Last year around Christmas president Obama announced the permission of free travel and trade with Cuba. This will hopefully strengthen relations and improve harmony between these two countries.

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How to Make an Attractive City

We've grown good at making many things in the modern world - but strangely the art of making attractive cities has been lost. Here are some key principles for how to make attractive cities once again.

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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 6:57 PM

Summary: This interesting video talks about principles that should be considered by city planners that could make our life's better and happier.

 

Insight: This video is relevant  to unit 7 because it shows efforts that should be taken by urban planners and how a simple city layout can effect our lives. 

Emerald Pina's curator insight, Today, 1:01 AM

This video gives you an overview of how to make the most attractive city in six ways. It explains the reasons and the wants of a city that potential residents are looking for.

 

This video relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about the orgin, site and situation a city should have for it to be considered attractive to people. A city should be chaotic/ordered, should have visible life, compact, is should have a nice/mysterious orientation, it should not be too big or too small, and it should be local and lively. Today, many cities lack attractiveness because of the intellectual confusion around beauty and the lack of political will. I totally agree with video and the requirement s to have an attrative city. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, Today, 4:17 AM

We definitely need more visually pleasing cities, our world is lacking and we are loosing it to like in the video "corporate opportunists".

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Street Art Chilango (mexico df, Mexico) - Artist - Global Street Art...

Street Art Chilango (mexico df, Mexico) - Artist - Global Street Art... | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Artist profile for Street Art Chilango (mexico df, Mexico) - "Community that celebrate and share visual demonstrations in Mexico City, Connect with us and the city, using...
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Train Derailment Highlights Amtrak's Infrastructure Needs

Train Derailment Highlights Amtrak's Infrastructure Needs | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Amtrak was created in the 1970s to allow several private railroads to get out of the passenger business. Experts say that while its safety record is generally good, it needs upgrading.
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Women in Agriculture - YouTube

Everyday in Papua New Guinea's rugged eastern Highlands province, the nation's biggest business success story is taking place. It is the story of women farme...
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Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 26, 7:37 PM

Summary: This video was filmed in Papua New Guinea, and it was showing the role of women in agriculture. It showed all of the markets such as raising pigs, fish, cows, flowers, water cress, and other produce, that was run solely by women. It was also stated that women are the ones who mostly bring food to the table, as well as pa for their children's school tuitions. 

 

Insight: This shows how involved and necessary women are in agriculture, especially in developing worlds, and how this role in agriculture alone has made it a lot easier for them to be placed in power in other situations as well. 

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'Substantial' El Nino event predicted - BBC News

'Substantial' El Nino event predicted - BBC News | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The El Nino event, which can drive droughts and flooding, is under way in the tropical Pacific, say scientists.
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A City For Abandoned Mothers In India

Thousands of widows have been making their way to the holy city of Vrindavan in northern India to spend the rest of their lonely lives. Cast out by their families, or simply alone in the world, some travel hundreds of miles to get there.

 

Tags: gender, India, SouthAsia,  culture.


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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 5:10 PM

There are 15,000 widows living in the city of Vrindavan and most of them come from over 1300 km away; West Bengal. After their husbands death, these women have been beaten and tortured by their own children for money they don't have and have had to escape to this holy city for safety where, even though they are away from the beatings, they much beg and sing for money. Many wish for death over this humiliation. 

A woman, capable of bringing life into the world, should never be treated like this and especially by her own family. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, Today, 4:32 AM

It is crazy to think Indian families would abuse these widows, but what questions me is the reason to flee for spiritual fulfillment. I understand why one would leave because their family betrayed them but why spiritual fulfillment?

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River Maps

River Maps | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Rivers have been a key part of urban life for centuries. They have provided us with drinking water, protection, and a transit network that links us from one settlement to the next. I wanted to create a series of maps that gives people a new way to look at rivers: a much more modern, urban type of portrayal. So I turned to the style of urban transit maps pioneered by Harry Beck in the 1930s for the London Underground. Straight lines, 45º angles, simple geometry. The result is more of an abstract network representation than you would find on most maps, but it’s also a lot more fun. The geography is intentionally distorted to clarify relationships. I think it helps translate the sort of visual language of nature into a more engineered one, putting the organic in more constructed terms. Not every line depicted is navigable, but all are important to the hydrological systems shown.

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Seaweed Farms in South Korea

Seaweed Farms in South Korea | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The dark squares that make up the checkerboard pattern in this image are fields of a sort—fields of seaweed. Along the south coast of South Korea, seaweed is often grown on ropes, which are held near the surface with buoys. This technique ensures that the seaweed stays close enough to the surface to get enough light during high tide but doesn’t scrape against the bottom during low tide.

The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired this image of seaweed cultivation in the shallow waters around Sisan Island on January 31, 2014. Today, about 90 percent of all the seaweed that humans consume globally is farmed. That may be good for the environment. In comparison to other types of food production, seaweed farming has a light environmental footprint because it does not require fresh water or fertilizer.

 

Tags: South Korea, East Asia,  remote sensing, land use, food, economic, food production, agribusiness.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 28, 9:47 AM

Yet I wonder: After Fukushima, will seaweed glow in the dark? Are they checking harvested seaweed for radioactive pollution?

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:03 PM

Hate to toot my own horn, but we South Koreans are pretty smart.  :-)  This is a great idea!  I wonder what sea life feeds on seaweed?  Is there a chance for any bacteria to mess with the seaweed?  I wonder if we could do this in other places versus having it imported.  There are heavily populated American cities with a market for Asian food.  But then how does polluted water play a role or high bacteria days?  I certainly feel afraid to eat fish out of the Seekonk.  

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Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It

Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Those living in areas without fresh produce tend not to eat well. But just putting in a supermarket is not a panacea, it turns out.

 

Tags: food distribution, food, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 10, 9:27 AM

Stigmergy at work.

Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, May 10, 3:55 PM

It is difficult to change the junk food and convenience food culture in one generation. 

Robert Slone's curator insight, May 19, 9:04 AM

This was really surprising , it is amazing how education effects every area of our lives .

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The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine Born Of U.S. Prejudice

The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine Born Of U.S. Prejudice | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Fried yellow chilis. Baja-style fish. Not the typical Chinese restaurant fare, unless you're near the U.S.-Mexico border. The reasons go back to an 1882 law enacted to keep Chinese out of the U.S.
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Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 26, 7:48 PM

Summary: This article talks about an odd fusion of Mexican ingredients into Chinese cuisine that occurs quite frequently along the Mexico-California border in one county. This occurred because in the 1800's, many Chinese immigrants were banned from entering the United States. Instead, they settled along the border and started up small businesses, implying their Asian cooking styles with the traditional Mexican ingredients. Out comes the remarkable fusion of two seemingly polar cuisines into one idea.

 

Insight: This can be seen as the creation of a multiculture, specifically in this one area on the Mexico-California border. It's remarkable how well the cultures molded together, and how well it stuck with the people in the area, as some people drive for two hours twice a month just to eat at one of these restaurants. 

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Avian Flu Outbreak Takes Poultry Producers Into Uncharted Territory

Avian Flu Outbreak Takes Poultry Producers Into Uncharted Territory | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Avian influenza is ravaging poultry flocks across the Upper Midwest. The virus is "doing things we've never seen it do before," and understanding about transmission is very limited, a scientist says.
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Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms

Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
American English has a rich history of regionalisms — which sometimes tell us a lot about where we come from.
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Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos

Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"We have a myth today that the ghettos in metropolitan areas around the country are what the Supreme Court calls 'de-facto' — just the accident of the fact that people have not enough income to move into middle class neighborhoods or because real estate agents steered black and white families to different neighborhoods or because there was white flight.  It was not the unintended effect of benign policies, it was an explicit, racially purposeful policy that was pursued at all levels of government, and that's the reason we have these ghettos today and we are reaping the fruits of those policies."


Tags: economic, race, racism, historical, neighborhood, podcast, urban, place, poverty, socioeconomic.


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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 3:57 PM

Ghettos were created because of many factors; one of these being in the 20th century real estate agents "blockbusting" basically meaning scaring white folks into thinking their neighborhood was becoming a slum causing them to quickly sell their house to real estate agents for an extremely low price and then turning around to sell the same house to black folks for much more because of limited homes for them to live in.

The ethnic neighborhoods and ghettos that still exist now are the result of people not having enough income to move to middle class neighborhoods and because real estate agents steered black and white families apart. 

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Why A Philadelphia Grocery Chain Is Thriving In Food Deserts

Why A Philadelphia Grocery Chain Is Thriving In Food Deserts | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Brown's Super Stores operates seven profitable supermarkets in low-income neighborhoods in Philadelphia. The founder says it's because he figured out what communities needed in a neighborhood store.
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What 2,000 Calories Looks Like

What 2,000 Calories Looks Like | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Even as restaurants talk about smaller portions, they continue to serve a full day's worth of calories in a single meal — or even a single dish.
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Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 26, 7:16 PM

Summary: This article put items from restaurants onto a scale to see how much of a normal 2,000 calorie day that meal could take up. Some of the meals easily surpassed this, and in some situations a single dish or beverage was able to tip the scale over 2,000 calories. So even if these restaurants are serving smaller portions, these portions are still so rich in calories. They also showed how much more variety you could eat if you cooked your meals at home, and how much more balanced it is to eat this way.

 

Insight: This article alone shows us how the global food distribution is far from equal. If kids in Africa had a single milkshake from Sonic, that's enough calories to last them a whole day, they probably don't get 2,000 calories from a weeks-worth of meals. With the concept of fast food being added into developed countries, it's tipped the global food distribution away from developing countries even more, because it makes it even simpler for those in developed countries to get food. 

 

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Women | Farming First

Women | Farming First | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
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SBS's interactive graphic novel The Boat brings Vietnamese refugee experience to life

SBS's interactive graphic novel The Boat brings Vietnamese refugee experience to life | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A Sydney comic artist reinterprets Nam Le's The Boat for the digital age.

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Vertical villages are changing the concept of neighborhood

Vertical villages are changing the concept of neighborhood | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Multifamily dwellings in high-density areas are changing the concept of neighborhood.

 

Tags: housing, urban, place, neighborhood, spatial, density.


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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, May 26, 10:13 PM

Unit 7 Urban

       The article describes a vertical neighborhood which is similar to an apartment, but instead has multiple family residences stacked on top of each other. This type of a community helps decrease land use and increases communication between people and creates a sense of community. The residents often interact, see each other, and form deep bonds that would be difficult to do in a street of single family homes.

        As land prices skyrocket and living in a city becomes more expensive the main solution used by architects is to build up. The sky is the limit and there is plenty of space in the sky providing an ideal space for people to live and expand into. However, with the increase of skyscrapers and multi storied buildings, air pollution increases due to the height of the building and any smoke or waste released from the building. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, Today, 5:16 AM

How cool is it that our world is changing every second? Some would say that it sucks and that we need to slow down. But why slow down, so much innovation is happening and we are at the front seat of it. People live differently now rather than sticking with old traditions and it is neat to see how they adjust to high-density areas.

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What's the Yemen conflict really about?

What's the Yemen conflict really about? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Is the conflict due to geographical rivalry, sectarian divisions, disappointment after the 2011 revolution or is it part of a wider regional power play?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 22, 2:58 PM

Saudi Arabia has recently announced that they stop their 4 week long bombing campaign against a rebel group in Yemen.  Like many complex geopolitical conflict, it is hard for students to begin to understand what the fighting is really about, but this article is a solid introduction to the Yemen conflict


Tags: Yemen, political, conflict.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, April 24, 12:42 PM

Something we should know about another insane conflict in which the United States became involved to worsen an already difficult situation

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 5:36 PM

In 2011, it is told that people from all religion would gather together in the town square, to eat from the same plate, pray for peace together and learn in the same schools; they were not separated by religion. Now Houthis changed from victims, to armed militia. Those who would've given their life back in 2011 for the sake of a better future would not be so willing now due to the fact they would only be collateral damage. 

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Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It

Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Those living in areas without fresh produce tend not to eat well. But just putting in a supermarket is not a panacea, it turns out.

 

Tags: food distribution, food, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 10, 9:27 AM

Stigmergy at work.

Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, May 10, 3:55 PM

It is difficult to change the junk food and convenience food culture in one generation. 

Robert Slone's curator insight, May 19, 9:04 AM

This was really surprising , it is amazing how education effects every area of our lives .

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Healthy Congress Index | Bipartisan Policy Center

Healthy Congress Index | Bipartisan Policy Center | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
BPC's Healthy Congress Index provides Americans with crucial metrics for evaluating Congress’s ability to effectively legislate and govern.
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Interesting metric.

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