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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.

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Viva Gentrification!

Viva Gentrification! | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"In Highland Park, as in other Latino barrios of Los Angeles, gentrification has produced an undeniable but little appreciated side effect: the end of decades of de facto racial segregation. It's possible to imagine a future in which 'the hood' passes into memory.  Racial integration is on the upswing.  For all the fortitude and pride you'll find in Latino barrios, no one wants to live in a racially segregated community or attend a racially segregated school."  

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, California, Los Angeles.

 


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Sex and equality

Sex and equality | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
How women fare around the worldFOR eight years the World Economic Forum has released a ranking of how women are narrowing the gap compared to men in terms of...
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How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 25, 5:32 PM

this video explains- as it says in it's headline- how the UN works. It essentially covers the different operations the UN takes part in to maintain world peace; ranging from security to human rights to disease and so on. It also talks about the security council which consists of France, the UK, US, China, and Russia, along with the general assembly.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:11 PM

The United Nations (UN) constantly works on maintaining international peace, economic issues, and cultural and human rights around the world. The UN has a tremendous impact around the world, with 193 nations participating in frequent meeting about how to resolve global and domestic issues and making policies for the world. The UN plays an important role in &maintain[ing] international peace and security; to develop friendly relations among nations; to operate in solving international problems and in promoting respect for human rights; and finally to be a center for harmonizing the actions of nations&(WWW.UN.org). The UN has a lot of responsibilities as it tries to keep the whole world at peace.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 7:03 PM

This is a very short and simplified video that explains all about what the UN is and what they do. The UN plays a major role in helping developing countries and taking part with them if they are in need of help or in a crisis. This video also explains what the security council is and what they do.

 

I already knew most of the things mentioned in the video, but I always think that UN things are interesting and I'm always willing to learn more about what they do and how they are helping the world.

 

 

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Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World?

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"A photo gallery of the world's ten smallest countries, from 0.2 square miles on up to 115 square miles, these ten smallest countries are microstates."


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Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, March 23, 2:41 AM

This picture slide show has to do with microstates, which are states or terratories that are both small in population and in size. These microstates are mostly near the sea, or even islands. Microstates have both pros and cons. Pros include having an abundant buffer zone: the sea. Another pro would be being alone, or isolated, (sometimes) this makes them free from other countries, which can be a pro and a con. A con may be that the country may have a harder time accessing fresh water, and improving agriculture with little land. Unit 4 deals with Microstates.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 11:53 AM

Pitcairn Island

Vatican City

Sovereign Military Order of Malta

San Marino

Monaco

Andorra

South Ossetia

Singapore

Transdniesteia

Bahrain

 

Just a few guesses...

 

Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 4:35 PM

This shows that the world is made up of several countries of different origins. people on this small island nation could have lived there for centuries. this is a goodway to show how diverse the world is.

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First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga

First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The first photographs have emerged of a newly formed volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean after three men climbed to the peak of the land mass off the coast of Tonga. Experts believe a volcano exploded underwater and then expanded until an island formed. The island is expected to erode back into the ocean in a matter of months.


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Coco Angus's curator insight, March 17, 4:45 PM

Mountain building 

WebGems SNMinc's curator insight, March 18, 12:20 AM

Spectacular view!

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 1:38 AM

I think this is a article about how a whole new island came up from a volcanic eruption. It gets even more interesting when you realize that it will disappear in a matter of months. This article shows photographs of this new island and information about it. I thought it was pretty interesting how seabirds are already laying eggs on the island!

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'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste

'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

In the 19th century, London was the capital of the largest empire the world had ever known — and it was infamously filthy. It had choking, sooty fogs; the Thames River was thick with human sewage; and the streets were covered with mud.  But according to Lee Jackson, author of Dirty Old London: The Victorian Fight Against Filth, mud was actually a euphemism. 'It was essentially composed of horse dung,' he tells Fresh Air's Sam Briger. 'There were tens of thousands of working horses in London [with] inevitable consequences for the streets. And the Victorians never really found an effective way of removing that, unfortunately.'"


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FCHSAPGEO's curator insight, March 14, 11:19 AM

We just spoke about this in class!

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 8:09 PM

It was after the 19th century that Joseph Bazelgette invented the sewer system in London that ultimately decreased the death rate in the city. At this time, horses served as the primary mode of transportation but also caused significant health problems due to the the excrement and urine left in the streets. Although we no longer rely on horses as a main soruce of transportation, we are experiencing another type of pollution caused by the ommission of harmful gases from automobiles. Infrastructure was not ideal and appropriate for most residents in the London. Dumping wastes into the river and drinking the water without any chemical treatment was one of the major health issues with which communities struggled. However, in present day China, people and industries continue to dump wastes into the rivers where local fish are caught for consumption. The lack of urban planning in London left 15,000 people dead. With so mmany people living in such close vicinity to each other, the diseases sread rapidly and wiped  out many impoverished communcities. Innovation in public health improved sanitiation conditions with the introduction of the toilet.However, in early 20th century culture, women were not comfortable using public toilets.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 12:03 PM

London has come a far way from the industrial town it was in the 19th century, and is now cleaner than ever. But pollution led to many issues in London at the time. This is also evident in the developing world today, such as in China, Africa, and South America.

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Urbanization Will Change The (Developing) World - Forbes

Urbanization Will Change The (Developing) World - Forbes | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
For the first time in history more than half the world’s population resides in cities. The world’s urban population now stands at 3.7 billion people, and this number is expected to double by 2050.
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Rapid coastal population growth may leave many exposed to sea-level rise

Rapid coastal population growth may leave many exposed to sea-level rise | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The number of people potentially exposed to future sea level rise and associated storm surge flooding may be highest in low-elevation coastal zones in Asia and Africa.
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The Ride of Their Lives

The Ride of Their Lives | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
At a time of urbanization and connectivity, rodeo and ranching may seem anachronistic, but to the Wright family, they represent the present and the future.
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Mass Deaths in Americas Start New CO2 Epoch

Mass Deaths in Americas Start New CO2 Epoch | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A new proposal pegs the start of the Anthropocene to the Little Ice Age and the Columbian Exchange
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This is what 20 years of gender equality progress looks like - Mashable

This is what 20 years of gender equality progress looks like - Mashable | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A girl's chances of receiving an education, enjoying a constitutional right to equality and living longer have increased considerably.
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Can we build power plants that actually take carbon dioxide out of the air?

A new study shows how California might be able to go carbon-negative using futuristic biomass plants.
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WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers

WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"As the demand for its products escalated early in World War II, the Army Map Service, a heritage organization of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, was losing much of its largely male workforce to the armed forces. A solution to the urgent need for replacements emerged when the University of Chicago’s Geography Department developed a course in military map making and began offering it to women’s colleges in the East and Midwest."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 11:19 AM

Women in science are awesome and we need to encourage girls in STEM disciplines, especially geospatial technologies...hearing this story of women in the past might help to inspire a future generation. 


Tags: mapping, cartographywar, gender, STEM, geospatial.

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2:19 AM

I believe this article is very empowering for women around the world. It showed how in this time of trouble in America we took into account the women's workforce and started using it. This article shows how much women helped by making the maps for the male army that was off at war. This story should empower women int their fight for equality and inspire them.

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The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.

 

Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


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Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 23, 7:41 PM

How to understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places

This article shows different gestures and describes the meaning of each. However, the meaning of each gesture depends on where you are in the world. Different places determine if a gesture is appropriate or inappropriate. 

This relates to our unit because it is about the behaviors of people depending on where they live in the world. This article teaches people about the behaviors of others and helps us understand the differences in cultures based on the region of the the world they live in. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 12:17 PM

unit 3

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:14 PM

People say that actions speak louder than words. However, as far as body language is concerned, actions can possess different meanings in other parts of the world. As a result, some things are better expressed through annunciation than action. It is interesting to consider the many ways body language is interpreted in different countries.  For example, for business purposes, people need to be well versed in the culture of the country and their current business practices. Otherwise, there could be harmful consequences in regards to the economy. In some countries, body language means different things in different regions. This is why it is important for people to be conscious about the culture and appropriate etiquette in different countries.

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Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects'

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy.

 

More academic pupils would be taught cross-subject topics such as the European Union - which would merge elements of economics, history (of the countries involved), languages and geography.

There are other changes too, not least to the traditional format that sees rows of pupils sitting passively in front of their teacher, listening to lessons or waiting to be questioned. Instead there will be a more collaborative approach, with pupils working in smaller groups to solve problems while improving their communication skills.


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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 25, 7:02 PM

This article covers the change of educational systems in Finland.. It notes that this change from 'subject' to 'topic' is the largest change in educational programs, and also that its a radical change because Finland prior school system ranked 3rd among the best in the world

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Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World?

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"A photo gallery of the world's ten smallest countries, from 0.2 square miles on up to 115 square miles, these ten smallest countries are microstates."


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Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, March 23, 2:41 AM

This picture slide show has to do with microstates, which are states or terratories that are both small in population and in size. These microstates are mostly near the sea, or even islands. Microstates have both pros and cons. Pros include having an abundant buffer zone: the sea. Another pro would be being alone, or isolated, (sometimes) this makes them free from other countries, which can be a pro and a con. A con may be that the country may have a harder time accessing fresh water, and improving agriculture with little land. Unit 4 deals with Microstates.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 11:53 AM

Pitcairn Island

Vatican City

Sovereign Military Order of Malta

San Marino

Monaco

Andorra

South Ossetia

Singapore

Transdniesteia

Bahrain

 

Just a few guesses...

 

Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 4:35 PM

This shows that the world is made up of several countries of different origins. people on this small island nation could have lived there for centuries. this is a goodway to show how diverse the world is.

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40 maps that explain the world

40 maps that explain the world | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Visualizing everything from the spread of religion to the most racially tolerant countries to the world's writing systems.
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Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 7:02 PM

Summary:  This article displays many maps that analyze population on a broad scale.  Among the most interesting were maps analyzing how welcoming a country's citizens are.  

 

Insight:  This series of maps has a lot to do with what we learned in Unit 2.  They are collections of data spatially analyzing populations.  So, basically all we did in Unit 2.

Christopher L. Story's curator insight, March 25, 8:48 AM

enlightening

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Why the side-hustle is key to Nigeria's economy

Nkem Ifejika meets with Nigerian entrepreneurs who show how the nation's economy is finding lubricants other than oil.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 20, 12:17 PM

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy. 


Tags: economic, laborNigeria, podcast

Rowena Spence Cortina's curator insight, March 10, 10:37 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 14, 9:11 AM

unit 6

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Retailers accused of labour abuses

Retailers accused of labour abuses | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A Human Rights Watch report uncovers alleged abuses at Cambodian garment factories supplying Marks & Spencer, Gap, H&M, Adidas and Armani.
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Modi bets on GM crops for India's second green revolution

Modi bets on GM crops for India's second green revolution | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
NEW DELHI (Reuters) - On a fenced plot not far from Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's home, a field of mustard is in full yellow bloom, representing his government's reversal of an effective ban on...

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Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 11:18 AM

This story talks about the difference the second agricultural revolution has made in India. It talks about the good and the bad about it. Monsanto said it is important for these farmers to create value on their farms. This is a good representation of the second agricultural revolution

Megan Becker's curator insight, March 23, 7:38 PM

Summery: This article discusses the new agricultural practices in India to feed its growing population. It's being called the "Second Green Revolution", the challenge being to replicate GMOs in the growing demand for edible oils and vegetables. 

 

Insight: This articles view on the growing agribusiness is incredibly original and insightful. India's growing population can't be supported without the use of GMOs, and their "Second Green Revolution" is just the way to solve that problem. 

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 24, 1:34 AM

I. A mustard field is in being grown in India. This field represents the government's reversal of an effective ban on field trials of genetically modified organisms. Prime Minister Modi supported the use of genetically modified crops, especially with India’s cotton harvest. However, grassroots groups associated with Modi's Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) have opposed GM crops because of the reliance on seeds patented by multinationals.

 

II. To a great extent farming India got to be independent in foodgrains after the dispatch of the Green Revolution in the 1960s, when it presented high-yielding seed assortments and the utilization of compost and watering system.The test now is to duplicate that achievement in eatable oils and vegetables, which are progressively sought after.

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Dot Earth | Did Earth's 'Anthropocene' Age of Man Begin With the Globalization ... - New York Times (blog)

Dot Earth | Did Earth's 'Anthropocene' Age of Man Begin With the Globalization ... - New York Times (blog) | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Scientists propose that Earth’s “age of humans,” the Anthropocene, began with the spread of disease in the Americas.
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Can Nairobi And Its One-Of-A-Kind National Park Continue To Coexist?

Can Nairobi And Its One-Of-A-Kind National Park Continue To Coexist? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
NAIROBI — The sun feels even more scorching under the cap of pollution.
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Scientists map unprecedented urbanization in East-Southeast Asia

Scientists map unprecedented urbanization in East-Southeast Asia | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Researchers have, for the first time, mapped the rapid urban expansion that has occurred across the whole of East-Southeast Asia in the last decade.

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Nepal steps up safe pesticide use

Nepal steps up safe pesticide use | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Nepal’s safe pesticide use programme now includes training for vendors who deal with farmers.
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Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 18, 11:18 PM

Unit 5 Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use


This article is about Nepal's unsafe pesticide use and storage and the governments encouragement for safer and minimal use of pesticides. They include an effective training programs for vendors and others who deal with farmers. A study, published in the Annals of Plant Protection Sciences in September 2014, showed vendors using inadequate technical knowledge of pesticides. Farmers were found exposing themselves to toxic pesticides by not following basic handling guidelines, and study showed 44 per cent of farmers interviewed storing pesticides in their homes. Customers were also being exposed to pesticide residue from failure to observe the required "waiting period" between spraying and harvesting. Sharma’s training programs for vendors covers laws and regulations, WHO classifications, commercial terminology, environmental and health impacts, field research on retail practices, impact on crop-friendly insects and expiration dates of pesticides.  


This relates to unit 5 because it covers agriculture and the use of pesticides. Pesticides are used to kill or repel any plant or animal that is considered a pest. The use of pesticides has also lead to environmental and health hazard. The Nepal government is pushing for farmers to use safe procedures when dealing with pesticides, but ultimately pushing for minimal use.