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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 2014 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."


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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, July 21, 2014 11:21 PM

Making sense of poverty.

 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 4:54 PM

"Access"--North America Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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World Bank eAtlas of Global Development

"The World Bank eAtlas of Global Development maps and graphs more than 175 thematically organized indicators for over 200 countries, letting you visualize and compare progress on the most important development challenges facing our world. Most indicators cover several decades, so you can see, for example, how 'life expectancy at birth' has improved from 1960 up through the latest year."  This tool should greatly enhance student projects as they will add more data, and see bigger patterns.  To go to the link visit: http://www.app.collinsindicate.com/worldbankatlas-global/en


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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 22, 11:56 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 3:11 PM

The reason why most of Africa and southern Asia has a low Human Development Index is because Africa and southern Asia has a high homelessness rate in comparison to other places and also, their economy is not as strong as Russia's, United States' or Europe's. It is cliché that Africa is mostly known for it's natural environments. Also, the Urban population in Africa is not as much as the Urban population in North America, South America, Europe, Russia and Australia.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 30, 10:23 AM

A bit old, but still useful info...

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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:46 PM

My uncles in Iowa grow corn for ethanol.  They have a small crop where they grow corn they consume.  It is literally the best corn I've ever had.  I'm actually surprised Rhode Island produces almost $4mil in sweet corn.  I'm amazed that Mass produces $100 mil in cranberries.  I've seen a few cranberry bogs close down.  We produce so much why can't we actually feed everyone?  

Diane Johnson's curator insight, January 28, 8:47 PM

Useful data for sustainability discussions

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:38 PM

These maps are interesting, in the fact that the heartland of the United States differs so much from either coast.  Both the coasts, as seen in the first map grow fruits and vegetables.  The center of the country grows wheat, and wheat is the dominant  crop of the country.  This might account for the reason why fruits and vegetables are more expensive than grain based products.  The second map helps to drive home this point even further, of how different the coasts are from the heartland.  What I also thought was funny, however, was the author's comment that it looks like an electoral map.  Perhaps, the reason heartland states tend to side with each other and republicans is because of shared interests in the political arena.

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The Meat Industry Now Consumes Four-Fifths of All Antibiotics

The Meat Industry Now Consumes Four-Fifths of All Antibiotics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
FDA dithers on regulation, releases new numbers on the industry's showing nearly half of retail chicken carries antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter.
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Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The position [that belief in God is essential to morality] is highly prevalent, if not universal, in Africa and the Middle East. At least three-quarters in all six countries surveyed in Africa say that faith in God is essential to morality.   People in richer nations tend to place less emphasis on the need to believe in God to have good values than people in poorer countries do."


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God Is.'s curator insight, January 20, 7:49 AM

Interesting data in several different ways...Can draw different conclusions from this, and perhaps shed light on things that need to be modified/changed as it pertains to our belief... A balancing act of sorts...Thank you for curating this... Maybe it will help will cure certain beliefs we hold, individually, and collectively...

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 7:37 PM

It would make sense that Indonesia is one of the most religious countries in the world being that it has the highest Muslim population. Also, I never thought of Europe as being religious countries which is why I am not surprised that 70% of Europe does not believe that the belief in God needs to be moral. Another reason why I am not surprised is because they are more popular for their ethnic groups such as the french group, italian group and german group. Also, they don't have focused religions. For example, Buddhism was originated in Nepal and worshipped mostly in China, Hinduism was originated in India, Jewish was originated in Israel and Islam was originated in Saudi Arabia and it's practiced mostly in Indonesia and Pakistan. That explains why most parts of Asia (at least southern Asia) has practices specific religions.

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 27, 11:58 PM

Summary- This figure explains the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. Only is Europe does God seem less important than the rest of the world. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study the distributions of many things, religion included. Why do so many poorer countries have a stronger faith in God than wealthier ones? It may be because if their ethnic backgrounds, but I think there is more to it. I think when a country is poorer, more people reach out to their God for help. I also think that in wealthier countries there are distractions from religion such as video games and other mass produced technologies that get in the way of people researching their faith.

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10 awesome international borders

10 awesome international borders | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Amazing images of international borders across the globe from Asia to America.

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Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day

Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 10:39 AM

Last year, Julie and I wrote this article for Maps 101 (which was also created into a podcast) about the historical and geographic significance of Dr. Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights movement.  Martin Luther King fought racial segregation, which, if you think about it, is a geographic system of oppression that uses space and place to control populations. Derek Alderman and Jerry Mitchell, excellent educators and researchers, produced lesson plans to help students investigate the politics behind place naming, specifically using the case study of the many streets named after Martin Luther King.  


Questions to Ponder: Why are streets named after Martin Luther King found in certain places and not in others? What forces and decisions likely drive these patterns? What is the historical legacy of Martin Luther King and how is it a part of certain cultural landscapes? 


Tags: seasonal, race, historical, the South, political, toponyms, landscape.

Kendra King's curator insight, January 22, 7:01 PM

Interesting and different way to view MLK.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 24, 7:27 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

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Enabling Globalization: The Container

Enabling Globalization: The Container | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The ships, railroads, and trucks that transport containers worldwide form the backbone of the global economy. The pace of globalization over the last sixty years has accelerated due to containers; just like canals and railroads defined earlier phases in the development of a global economy. While distance used to be the largest obstacle to regional integration, these successive waves of transportation improvements have functionally made the world a smaller place. Geographers refer to this as the Space-Time Convergence."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 14, 5:32 PM

I've posted here several resources about the global economy and the crucial role that containers play in enabling globalization.  In this article for National Geographic Education, I draw on many of these to to put it all in one nice container.  


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 31, 9:31 PM

By standardizing the containers, world wide exports and imports can flow much more freely and with less interruption. The same type of crane that loads a container full of vodka in Russia can unload that container in Abu Dhabi. Shared information about what works best and what need improving can be shared down the supply chain to make vast improvements across the network creating efficiencies as they go. The same technicians, the same mechanics and the same crane operators become interchangeable parts in this global system. What initially sounds like something Einstein would say, the Space-Time Convergence, is just a large Lego set with all of the parts ready made and fitted for universal use. Sometimes simpler is better...

 

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Syria threatened by food insecurity

Syria threatened by food insecurity | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The Syrian agricultural sector is deteriorating at an increasing rate. Destructive conditions over the past four years suggest that Syria may soon be hit by a wall of food insecurity. This disaster is even more tragic because Syria was once described as the “breadbasket of Rome” due to its production of grain, especially wheat. Until recently, Syria was working diligently to achieve self-sufficiency and food security. Before the outbreak of the country’s recent tragedy, Syria was considered an agricultural country, as the industry accounted for nearly 24% of its GNP.

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A Bamboo Tower That Produces Water From Air | WIRED

A Bamboo Tower That Produces Water From Air | WIRED | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The structure is designed to wring water out of thin air, providing a sustainable source of H2O for developing countries.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, January 10, 9:48 PM

La torre WarkaWater es una estructura poco probable encontrar que sobresale del paisaje etíope. A los 30 metros de altura y 13 metros de ancho, no es un medio tan grande como su árbol del mismo nombre (que puede vislumbrarse 75 pies de altura), pero es llamativo, no obstante. La torre larguirucho, de bambú celosía forrada con malla de poliéster de color naranja, no es arte, aunque sí especie de lo parece. Más bien, la estructura está diseñada para escurrir el agua fuera del aire, proporcionando una fuente sostenible de H2O para los países en desarrollo.

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A Geographical Oddity


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 10, 1:39 PM

Partly just because I love this highly quotable movie with an incredible soundtrack, but this short clip from O Brother Where Art Thou? can start be a good conversation starter.  I'm hoping to use it when discussing relative location (or isolation) as well as the time-space compression.  Frequently, I ask my student how far away they live from campus and invariably they answer with a unit of time (even though distance was implied in the question). 


Questions to Ponder: Why do we often answer with a measurement of time when discussing distance?  What technologies are dependent on our temporal analysis of distance? How would our perception of distance change based on our access to transportation and communication technologies?


Tags: Time-Space Compression, location.

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:47 PM

APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:26 PM

\I guess it's true what they say; a picture is worth a thousand words. Before even opening this article, you could get a sense from the picture that it wasn't going to be a good one. You can tell by their facial expressions and the environment that surrounds them. Even the colors that are portrayed in the picture send off meaning. The picture is not very bright. It sends off a sad image with all the brown everywhere. However, we do see a little peek of sunlight shining through. Before reading this, one might see this as a good sign from God, or someone watching over these people. Once I opened the article, there were many more pictures describing their lifestyles. You can tell that they don't make much money by the way they live. There was another picture in the article with a dark tint to it, representing a negative atmosphere, including one girl folding her arms and one girl with tears running down her face . There are no pictures were everyone in the images have smiles on their faces.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:18 PM

These picture paint a very sad and very real truth. Many of the people in the pictures are caring for children and barely have enough to make it through the day. One woman works long hours for about 50 cents a day and that is horrible, another woman is 40 years old and works at a construction site, which is obviously not the norm. These people, mainly the children, have hope of going to school, but for most of them that is just a dream that will never come true.

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StatPlanet World Bank

StatPlanet World Bank | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Explore world stats using StatPlanet World Bank, the first prize winner of the World Bank's Apps for Development competition. It directly accesses and visualizes all of the World Bank's 3000+ indicators available through its Open Data initiative, on many different topics from Agriculture to Science & Technology.  This is a great way to introduce students to thematic mapping and offers incredible freedom to explore what you find interesting.  This is the type of resource that could be used for any unit.   


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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HumdeBut's curator insight, January 29, 4:15 AM

pas vraiment à jour, mais les comparaisons sont souvent étonnantes !

Emma Boyle's curator insight, January 30, 10:25 AM

Also try "If It Were My Home"

HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

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Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources

Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Data is great, but working with numbers can be intimidating. We have more data than ever before that is available to us, and graphs, charts, and spreadsheets are ways that data can be shared. If that data has a spatial element to it, the best way to visualize a large dataset might just be a map."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 3:51 PM

I hope you enjoy this article I wrote about GeoFRED, a way to visualize economic statistics.  All of my future articles for National Geographic Education will be archived here at this link


Tags: National Geographicdevelopment, statistics,  economic, mapping.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 28, 12:05 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

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Name That Grid!

Name That Grid! | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 12:06 AM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this one that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         


Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

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Welcome To Whittier, Alaska, A Community Under One Roof

Welcome To Whittier, Alaska, A Community Under One Roof | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
This sleepy town on the west side of Prince William Sound is remote, and hit with brutal winter weather every year. Most of the residents live in a single 14-story building called Begich Towers.
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10 Territorial Disputes That Mean Your Maps Are Already Wrong

10 Territorial Disputes That Mean Your Maps Are Already Wrong | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
As it stands, there are well over 150 territorial disputes around the globe, some more urgent than others. Here are 10 you need to know about -- and that could redefine the world map.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 17, 12:11 PM

 The changing nature of maps.

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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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What Kids Around the World Eat for Breakfast

What Kids Around the World Eat for Breakfast | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
What do kids around the world eat for breakfast? It’s as likely to be coffee or kimchi as it is a sugary cereal.
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Local Greens: A water-smart farm in urban Berkeley

Local Greens: A water-smart farm in urban Berkeley | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Meet Local Greens: an urban farm in northwest Berkeley growing delicious, organic produce and microgreens with barely any water.

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2015, the year of geopolitical upheaval

2015, the year of geopolitical upheaval | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The world could be set for troublesome realignments -- especially in economics -- on a scale not seen since the Cold War

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