Haak's APHG
1.4K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
onto Haak's APHG
Scoop.it!

Korea and the Yellow Sea

Korea and the Yellow Sea | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
While city lights at night serve as a good proxy for population density, North Korea provides a dark exception.

Via Seth Dixon
Dean Haakenson's insight:

Amazing photo! Population density is a good issue but also political geography and economic geography as well.

more...
서병기's curator insight, November 6, 2014 7:03 PM

We should try to alleviate the great difference of the North and South Korea. It's time to cooperate.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 25, 2014 10:59 AM

The contrast between North and South Korea in this Earth at Night image shows just how different these countries are. South Korea, with aid from the United States, is becoming a highly developed and prosperous power, with a impressive economy compared to what it was just decades ago. On the other hand, North Korea is dark, both literally and figuratively. North Korea's economy remains highly undeveloped, and the few utilities that the country provides are unreliable and not far stretching. The only visible bright light in North Korea is the city of Pyongyang, and even that is nothing compared to Seoul.

 

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:16 PM

Devastated by the war that secured its independence, South Korea entered the 1960's as a third world country. Today, it is one of the strongest economies in the world, with a vibrant culture and strong allies in the US and Japan. The economic growth it experienced in the final decades of the 20th century is nothing short of remarkable, thoroughly earning its title as an "Asian Tiger" economy. The quality of life enjoyed by its citizens, and the nation continues to prosper in the face of aggression shown by its northern neighbor. The leaps and bounds made in the South Korean economy and its infrastructure is highlighted by this map, showing the intense amounts of development that have occurred all over the country- there isn't a dark spot in the entire southern half of the Korean peninsula. Contrasted to North Korea, its particular striking- the two nations have really taken opposite paths since the end to hostilities between the two in 1953. Should they be able to avoid another conflict, South Korea will only continue to prosper as we push forward into the 21st century.

Page for My AP Human Geography Course
Curated by Dean Haakenson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Global Studies @ Maggie L. Walker Governor's School
Scoop.it!

Myanmar's Rohingya Are in Crisis—What You Need to Know

Myanmar's Rohingya Are in Crisis—What You Need to Know | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
They've been called the world's most persecuted minority. Learn who they are and why they're fleeing.
Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:23 AM

It is interesting to see the demographic transition model in real life effect. As time passes, underdeveloped countries will enter stage 3 of the demographic transition model and see a decline in birth rate and death rate remains relatively low. Most developing countries now will enter the very end of stage 3 and even stage 4 as birth rates balance of death rates. The real question is whether or not Earth will be able to sustain 11 billion people. It is scary to see the world in a rapid population boom. This population growth relates to the agricultural unit in that the use of GMO's is to accommodate the rapidly growing populations in the world.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:25 AM

The population was originally predicted to level off in the next half century, but this is not the case by a long-shot, as predicted by the UN.

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:12 PM

These articles from the Guardian and National Geographic were the first I'd heard of the new population projections for the future.  For many years it was assumed that the global population would level out at around 9 billion; while that is still within the range of possibilities but these new projections indicate that it is much more likely that the total global population will be much higher than that.  The geographic implications of this are far reaching.   

 

Tag: population, demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Fertility Rates-Differences Within Countries

"An important aspect about country level data of fertility to keep in mind is that there can be considerable heterogeneity within countries, which are hidden in the mean fertility which were discussed in this entry. The mean Total Fertility Rate for India in 2010 was 2.8 (UN Data): But this average hides the fact that the fertility in many Southern Indian regions was below 1.5 (which is similar to the mean fertility in many European countries), while the fertility in Northern India was still higher than 5 children per woman (which is as high as the mean of the African countries with the highest fertility)."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 23, 2016 2:05 PM

This is a stunning example of uneven development and regional differences within countries.  Too often we discuss countries as if the situation inside the borders of one country is the same throughout it, even if the geographic contexts can be wildly different. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why are the fertility rates in so different in northern and southern India?  How does this regional imbalance impact the country?  What are other examples of major differences within a country? 

 

Tags: regions, population, demographic transition model, declining populationmodelsunit 2 population, India, South Asia. 

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
ROCAFORT's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:14 AM
Human Population Through Time
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:23 PM
Pour la DNL seconde
 
Jordyn Reeves's curator insight, January 11, 3:44 PM
This relates to our topic by showing that our population is growing rapidly. By the time 2025 there will be more than 11 billion people on the Earth. But we have enough resources to last us.
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Shrinking GDP and a falling population are poised to turn Japan into what economists call a "demographic time bomb," and other countries could be next.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 16, 8:03 AM
Population unit 
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 20, 10:34 PM

Preliminary HSc - Global challenges: Population

Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 9:01 PM

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Haak's APHG
Scoop.it!

Gamification In Education Stats | LearnDash

Gamification In Education Stats | LearnDash | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
#Gamification in #Education Stats - https://t.co/VoEp3aneLu via @learndashlms https://t.co/nrCwr9ACUg
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dean Haakenson
Scoop.it!

#Gamification for an improved learning experience: a visual guide (by @AndoniSanz) - e-Learning Feeds

#Gamification for an improved learning experience: a visual guide (by @AndoniSanz) - e-Learning Feeds | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
http://www.slideshare.net/andonisanz/gamification-mechanics-in-education-andonisanz
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dean Haakenson
Scoop.it!

What are the alternatives if Britain leaves the EU?

What are the alternatives if Britain leaves the EU? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

If Britain votes to leave the EU, what would the options be for our political
and trade relationship with Europe?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Staking a claim to create a country

Staking a claim to create a country | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Jeremiah Heaton wants a no-man’s-land in east Africa, but international officials say his claim is insufficient.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 1:14 PM

There was once an episode of Family Guy where Peter Griffin establishes his own country when his house is left of a map of Quahog. This story reminds me of that episode, but also raises some questions as to what it takes to be a sovereign nation. Jeremiah Heaton has long term goals of creating an agricultural production center, has been living in area and is willing to put in the work to establish a political identity. Also an extreme example it does show how some nations come to be globally recognized and also how many forces are against new nations being established and recognized.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:33 PM

This man decided to give his daughter a piece of unclaimed territory in Africa for her seventh birthday so that she could be a princess.  Now he wants his country to be recognized by surrounding countries as well as the UN.  Everyone is saying that this is not allowed for various reasons.  He does not have people living there, he is not himself inhabiting the area, other countries are not recognizing his claim, and one cannot simply put a flag in the ground and say that it is theirs.  If this were the case there would be seven billion flags around the world.  He is claiming that he has hopes for this area, turning it into an agricultural center where he can help with food supply issues in the surrounding area.  I see that he has hopes and dreams for the area, but as far as calling it his own country I don't see that going as well as he thinks.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 10:32 AM

Having read through most of the article, I find it funny how he actually believes that he can just step foot on soil and claim it as his own country. The description, “members of the occupying nation must have lived on the land for several years,” and, “it must also demonstrate that it has occupied the space, not that it just physically stepped foot there,” are the best ways to describe why it would never work for him. You have to make use of the space that is provided. Even though he claims that he will, turn the country into an agricultural production center that will tackle food security issues in the region, it hasn’t been done yet, and even if it was he wouldn’t occupy nearly enough of the space. Egypt and Sudan are officially negotiating over the land.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

xkcd: Terminology

xkcd: Terminology | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:14 PM

I use this classic xkcd image every semester that I teach world regional geography.  The explanation of this image is helpful if the students fail to understand the context or the point of this comic strip.  The very idea of 'western' and 'eastern' is very much an idea that comes from 'the west' (Greek and Roman civilizations anciently, and a broadly European more recently). The Euro-centric view of the world from a single 'starting point' is one reason some geographers don't like the term 'Middle East,' but prefer Southwest Asia and North Africa.  The Middle East implies a European starting point as does the Far East.     

 

Tagsregions, perspective.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Timeline of the Breakup of Yugoslavia

Map animation depicting the break up of Yugoslavia through the series of political upheavals and conflicts that occurred from the early 1990's onwards. Different areas of control are colour coded.

 

Tags: devolution, historical, political, states, borders, political, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dean Haakenson
Scoop.it!

As 2016 dawns, Europe braces for more waves of migrants

As 2016 dawns, Europe braces for more waves of migrants | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Bitter cold, biting winds and rough winter seas have done little to stem the seemingly endless flow of desperate people fleeing war or ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dean Haakenson
Scoop.it!

Brexit: a referendum on Ireland’s future

Brexit: a referendum on Ireland’s future | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The UK ballot on whether it should withdraw from the EU could take place this year. A decision to leave would change this country more radically than any domestic election

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 2014 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Stats that reshape your world-view

With the drama and urgency of a sportscaster, statistics guru Hans Rosling uses an amazing new presentation tool, Gapminder, to present data that debunks several myths about world development. Rosling is professor of international health at Sweden's Karolinska Institute, and founder of Gapminder, a nonprofit that brings vital global data to life.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 2015 3:01 PM

It is never a bad time to hear from Hans Rosling.  In this TED talk he shares data that shows how popular myths about the less developed world (especially fertility rates and life expectancy) have radically changed in the last 40 years.


Tags: gapminder, development, TED.

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:04 PM

It is never a bad time to hear from Hans Rosling.  In this TED talk he shares data that shows how popular myths about the less developed world (especially fertility rates and life expectancy) have radically changed in the last 40 years.


Tags: gapminder, development, TED.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Malthus Is Still Wrong

Why Malthus Is Still Wrong | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Why Malthus makes for bad science policy

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 6, 2016 9:53 AM

The ideas of Thomas Malthus have always loomed large; the scope includes some of the biggest issues facing humanity's continued existence on this planet.  His controversial ideas have been debated and inspired some policies that were especially damaging.  This anti-Malthusian op-ed was written by the Publisher of Skeptic Magazine; I typically pair this with the neo-Malthusian op-ed written by the  President of the Canada's Population institute.  Comparing and contrasting the merits of these articles provides a way to get student to assess the strengths of an argument and to identify the bias/perspective of the author.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tagsop-ed, demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 6, 8:05 AM
What did Malthus get right? and what did he get wrong?
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population, Sustainability, and Malthus

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th century, but for some reason, he keeps coming up when we talk about population. In 1800, the human population of the Earth passed 1 billion, and Thomas Malthus posited that growth had hit its ceiling, and the population would level off and stop growing. He was totally right. Just kidding, he was totally wrong! There are like 7 billion people on the planet now! John will teach a little about how Malthus made his calculations, and explain how Malthus came up with the wrong answer. As is often the case, it has to do with making projections based on faulty assumptions. Man, people do that a lot.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 4:15 PM

This is a succinct summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHGunit 2 population

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Human Settlement Predictive Model

"Simulating climate conditions over the last 125,000 years and predicting how those changes would have allowed humans to spread around the globe, this video models human migration patterns." Read more: http://ow.ly/lWIp304qZEo


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 3:14 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 18, 12:11 AM
Some interesting modelling based on climate change. I wonder what it would look like based on something different? Cultural differences? What came first culture or climate?
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 9:02 PM

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

Scooped by Dean Haakenson
Scoop.it!

Gamification In Education Stats | LearnDash

Gamification In Education Stats | LearnDash | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
#Gamification in #Education Stats - https://t.co/VoEp3aneLu via @learndashlms https://t.co/nrCwr9ACUg
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dean Haakenson
Scoop.it!

Turkey in spotlight as EU leaders debate refugee crisis

Turkey in spotlight as EU leaders debate refugee crisis | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

No new substantive measures expected to emerge from two-day summit in Brussels

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt

Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
On why a Prussian scientific visionary should be studied afresh…In a superb biography, Andrea Wulf makes an inspired case for Alexander von Humboldt to be considered the greatest scientist of the 19th century. Certainly he was the last great polymath in a scientific world which, by the time he died in Berlin in 1859, aged 89, was fast hardening into the narrow specializations that typify science to this day. Yet in the English-speaking world, Humboldt is strangely little-known.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 10, 2015 8:28 AM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here is another article and TED-ED video on the most influential scientist that you might not have heard of (at least until today).

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography.

Tony Burton's curator insight, January 29, 2016 11:32 AM

An interesting biography, but, strangely, Ms Wulf almost completely ignores Humboldt's time in Mexico. In some ways, his time in Mexico was more pivotal in terms of geography than his time in South America. Claiming that Humboldt is a virtual unknown in Europe is a gross distortion of the facts; there have been numerous books about Humboldt over the last thirty to forty years, let alone before that time!.

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 2016 6:25 AM

De nieuwe methode van de onderbouw: (Alexander von) Humboldt

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 15, 2015 11:39 AM
A great read
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 6:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid

Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"All Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants to do is make the world a better place for his new daughter. While he’s technically on paternity leave, he couldn’t sit idly by as India attempts to halt Internet.org, Facebook’s initiative to provide free but limited internet to the developing world."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 29, 2015 6:02 PM

India is a country with amazing economic potential, but hampered but uneven levels of social development.  The so-called 'digital divide' can exacebate problems for the poor and their ability to join the emerging industries.  In this situation Facebook is offering free (partial) internet access to India's poor and the discussions about net neutrality and the potential ulterior motives are underway.

 

Questions to Ponder: Do you favor Zuckerberg's proposal or do you think that India should reject this offer?  

 

Tagsdevelopment, India, South Asia, infrastructuretechnology.

   

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, January 2, 2016 4:56 AM

Education access in  ALL  countries  has effects when not provided, equally!

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why is EU free movement so important?

Why is EU free movement so important? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Where did the idea of free movement of people come from? The precursor to the EU was formed as European leaders came together in the wake of the Second World War, wanting to prevent another catastrophic war. The idea was that allowing people to move across the continent - from countries where there were no jobs to countries where there were labour shortages - would not only boost European growth, but would help prevent war by getting people to mix more across borders.

"The founding fathers of the European Community wanted it to be a construct that also had a political integration and for that you needed people to move because the minute people crossed boundaries and borders, you had deeper integration… So it was both a social as well as an economic aim.

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalism, economic, mobility, political, states, migration.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, August 15, 2015 11:39 AM
A great read
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 6:57 AM

Immigration is a major source of tension within Europe. The influx of immigrants into Europe has led to a nativist backlash in many nations. The free movement of people is a bedrock principle of the European Union. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the leaders of Europe hoped that the open borders policy would  prevent another costly war by allowing people to move to were there were jobs were located. The mixing of cultures would also prevent war. People would develop an understanding of other cultures, which would make the possibility of war more remote. The leaders did not account for the strong nativist strand that often runs through many nations. The UK is threating to withdraw from the EU over this immigration issue. While immigration on the United States gets much of the attention, a more serous crises is actually occurring in Europe.

Scooped by Dean Haakenson
Scoop.it!

Why Europe Will Let Member States Opt Out of GM...

Why Europe Will Let Member States Opt Out of GM... | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

In the US, farmers have been cultivating crops with genetically engineered traits since the 1990s and their use – and consumption – is widespread.

That’s not the case in Europe.

more...
No comment yet.