Haak's APHG
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Haak's APHG
Page for My AP Human Geography Course
Curated by Dean Haakenson
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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


Via Seth Dixon
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lalita pradeep's curator insight, May 14, 2013 7:34 PM

wow....lovely map.........

Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, May 15, 2013 1:52 AM

It's quite amazing!

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 5:45 AM

When we first looked at this picture in class there was no way that I thought this map could be true. We are warned all the time to be careful what we look at on the internet, because for the most part a lot of the information is not true. When we looked at this photo in class we zoomed in on the area in the circle and first determined what was included  in that circle. Once we were able to detrmine what cities were within that circle we were then able to look up the population in each of those cities. We added up the total of each city to get the total population of the places within the circle. Then we researched the total population of the world. Once we were able to find this we subtracted the population from within the circle from the total population, and what we were left with was smaller than the total population within the circle. Which means that the map was true. I was shocked. There was no way that I thought this was true. What was interesting to me was the process we went through to determine that this map was even true. We had to detrmine the area we were working with and then research the information to get a solution. I think you learn a lot just by this simple picture. This map happened to be true however there are many picture listed under this map that are untrue that we are faced with all the time, that if we took the time to research we woudl realize are silly pictures. Just by researching information about a picutre like this can teach us a lot about a place. 

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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 8:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 7:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.