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Page for My AP Human Geography Course
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Mapping World Religions


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 9:58 AM

This video puts world religions in a more basic form. Shows the patterns that religions take on a global scale, outlining the most prominent and least prominent throughout the world. 

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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
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Why Map Projections Matter

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection.  While a bit comical, the cartographic debate is quite informative even if it was designed to appear as though the issue was trivial. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  

 

Tags: Mapping, geospatial, video, visualization. 

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Lydia Blevins's comment, September 13, 2012 6:17 AM
I think it is very important that we start using more accurate maps. In school, the maps we use are so different from how the world actually is. I agree that children will grow up thinking some places are less important because they are minimized by the map projection.
Greg Atkinson's comment, October 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Great clip. I use it in my WRG class as a comedic introduction to the power of projection.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:01 PM

This absolutely the best video clip for SS teachers EVER!

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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.