Haak's APHG
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Vertical villages are changing the concept of neighborhood

Vertical villages are changing the concept of neighborhood | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Multifamily dwellings in high-density areas are changing the concept of neighborhood.

 

Tags: housing, urban, place, neighborhood, spatial, density.


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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:13 PM

Unit 7 Urban

       The article describes a vertical neighborhood which is similar to an apartment, but instead has multiple family residences stacked on top of each other. This type of a community helps decrease land use and increases communication between people and creates a sense of community. The residents often interact, see each other, and form deep bonds that would be difficult to do in a street of single family homes.

        As land prices skyrocket and living in a city becomes more expensive the main solution used by architects is to build up. The sky is the limit and there is plenty of space in the sky providing an ideal space for people to live and expand into. However, with the increase of skyscrapers and multi storied buildings, air pollution increases due to the height of the building and any smoke or waste released from the building. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:16 AM

How cool is it that our world is changing every second? Some would say that it sucks and that we need to slow down. But why slow down, so much innovation is happening and we are at the front seat of it. People live differently now rather than sticking with old traditions and it is neat to see how they adjust to high-density areas.

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What is Geography?


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Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:38 PM

This presentation talks about the misconceptions of geography and about what it really involves. Geographers describe and try to explain how locations interact and relate to one another; are arranged the way they are; and have become what they are now. They also use critical thinking to project what the world might look like in the future. As there's usually so many questions that have to be answered, geography is an interdisciplinary work, meaning that it is a blend of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Geographers also develop other skills, such as mapping and graphing (spatial representation skills) and development of verbal concepts, frameworks and mathematical models (spatial theorizing skills). Geography, therefore, can be used to study many issues, such as climate change, sustainability, human rights, among others.

Reflection- as the presentation accurately shows, many people believe that geography is just about memorizing countries and our world's natural resources locations, but in reality, geography goes much deeper than that. Geography is about asking questions and trying to come out with the best answers in order to solve issues that can range from local usage of land to international security.

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:37 AM

Prezi created by students interested in the field of geography.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:26 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Prezi was created by students from theSyracuse Geography Department as part of a Senior Seminar to explain the disciple, the major and its utility.   This is a great recap of the discipline, the major and it's utility.

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Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages

Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Languages spoken by billions of people across Europe and Asia are descended from an ancient tongue uttered in southern Europe at the end of the last ice age, according to research.  The claim, by scientists in Britain, points to a common origin for vocabularies as varied as English and Urdu, Japanese and Itelmen, a language spoken along the north-eastern edge of Russia.  The ancestral language, spoken at least 15,000 years ago, gave rise to seven more that formed an ancient Eurasiatic 'superfamily', the researchers say. These in turn split into languages now spoken all over Eurasia, from Portugal to Siberia."

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Rainey Vause's curator insight, March 26, 10:38 PM

Unit 3: lang.

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Mapping A History Of The World, And Our Place In It

Mapping A History Of The World, And Our Place In It | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
On the Map author Simon Garfield speaks with NPR's Steve Inskeep about the history of maps, how they can be used as political tools, and how GPS and modern mapping applications are changing the way we see ourselves and our place in the world.

Via Seth Dixon
Dean Haakenson's insight:

This NPR podcast is a review of the book On the Map that explores how our minds perceive maps and how maps influence or perception of the world we live in.  Here is the NY Times review of the same book. 

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Dean Haakenson's comment, January 8, 2013 2:12 PM
Love this. It shows how maps can shape our ideas of the world--Reagan usin the Mercator Projection to convey the idea that the USSR was a very large threat. Great for APHG students.
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, January 8, 2013 10:09 PM

This NPR podcast is a review of the book On the Map that explores how our minds perceive maps and how maps influence or perception of the world we live in.  Here is the NY Times review of the same book. 

g tonge's curator insight, January 9, 2013 4:36 AM

This NPR podcast is a review of the book On the Map that explores how our minds perceive maps and how maps influence or perception of the world we live in.  Here is the NY Times review of the same book. 

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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The Geographic Advantage

The Geographic Advantage | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
We are living in an era of receding glaciers, accelerating loss of species habitat, unprecedented population migration, growing inequalities within and between nations, rising concerns over resource depletion, and shifting patterns of interaction and identity. This website provides 11 geographic investigations aligned to the geographic questions in the NRC Understanding Our Changing Planet report. The report focuses on the future directions in the geographical sciences and how these key questions will guide research to help us understand the planet on which we live.

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Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 2015 6:17 PM

This article by the AAG emphasizes that in order to provide a healthier, more prospering world, we need to do 4 things. These 4 things are: environmental change, promote sustainability, spatial reorganization of the economy and society, and harness technological change. This will allow us to create more long term and sustainable geographic patterns. 

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:02 PM

I really liked this article as it was interactive. I was able to pick out the area of geography I wanted to learn about and then it took me to another page that gave me more in-depth explanations. It was an overall good refresher on different aspects of geography with emphasis on how we react with our environment. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:22 AM

I definitely agree with the website that geography is one of the most important, if not the most important tool in understanding the world today. Geography is not simply just naming and understanding place names, although that is certainly important to geography. Geography is about understanding the social, political, and economic causes and consequences resulting from the nationally and artificially conceived barriers, borders, and places. This is why I think everyone should be required to take AP Human Geography. The classes exposes you to so many of the current events, problems, and implication in society today. As a senior, I thought I had already learned everything I needed to learn in my previous classes, and little did I know that I was dead wrong in my assumption. This classes has singlehandedly taught me many of the problems in the world today, and this class is the most useful class I've ever taken that can be applied to the real world every single day. I'm beyond happy that I chose to take AP Human Geography. I'm grateful for all the information I've learned in this class. But most importantly, I'm most thankful for the endless curiosity this classes has sparked in me to understand the world around me.

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Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps

Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Spatial analysis has always been a hallmark of GIS, the 'numerical recipes' which set GIS apart from other forms of computerized visualization and information management. With GIS we pose questions and derive results using a wide array of analytical tools to help us understand and compare places, determine how places are related, find the best locations and paths, detect and quantify patterns, and even to make spatial predictions."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 7:50 PM

GIS is a key tool in spatial analysis, but it can also be a driving force in using math, science, technology and (yes) geography as interdisciplinary ways of teaching the curriculum.  StoryMaps can be rich with images and videos, but also filled with data at a variety of scales.  ESRI has share a "Maps we love" page with excellent examples of Story Maps and carefully explains WHY these maps work and HOW they were made.  Are you new to using the Analysis tool in ArcGIS Online?  Try this exercise on analyzing flood risk to guide you through some of the steps to learn what is possible for a project of your own.  What stories can you tell in this rich, visual format?  What visual template shown might lend itself best for that sort of project? 


Tagsmapping, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 29, 2014 12:16 PM

 Not only Spatial, even plain geography is very interesting and important,  but.....not everybody understands, and want to...

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Business Geography

Business Geography | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Grant Thrall, Ph.D., pioneered a new field of study — business geography — at the University of Florida.

 

Business geography involves using sophisticated technologies to interpret and analyze data to help businesses make decisions.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2013 2:09 PM

I understand that my readers are not people that I need to convince the geo-literacy is an essential component for a 21st century education; but we are the people that need to convince principals, politicians, school administrators, teachers and parents that teaching geography is fundamental.  Consider this an accessible article to use to make the case for geography for someone who sees the educational value from a business perspective.


Tags: edtech, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, geo-inspiration, geography education, models, spatial.

Tony Hall's curator insight, April 15, 2013 9:43 PM

While I find business quite boring, I do understand it's necessity. I think this illustrates very nicely the relevance of studying geography and how it relates to the "real" world. 

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Market Segmentation

Market Segmentation | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Nielsen Prizm is a tool used by companies to analyze their customers spending habits, lifestyle choices and spatial patterns.  Using their Zip Code Look Up feature, you can search any zip code to g...

 

This is an interesting glimpse into how market research analysts view neighborhoods, geography and spatial analysis.  This economic and cultural data has a wide range of uses (albeit with some serious limitations). 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, neighborhood, place, economic, consumption, spatial, mapping. 


Via Seth Dixon, Dennis V Thomas, Mr. David Burton
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CIM Academy's curator insight, July 17, 2015 5:13 AM

Segmentation is a key element in strategic planning. This article discusses the importance of market segmentation and provides some key insights.