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Page for My AP Human Geography Course
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Syrian Journey: Choose your own route

Syrian Journey: Choose your own route | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Put yourself in the shoes of a Syrian migrant and see whether you could make the right choices on the journey to Europe.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, Today, 10:43 AM

This BBC interactive tries to get the user to empathize with the plight and the geographic circumstances of Syrian refugees that are fleeing a land a strife.  The choices are not easy and there is no certain path.  This is an interesting interactive that is designed to build geographic empathy.


Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, Today, 12:09 PM

Europe is not always as welcoming to immigrants as one might think. There are reasons, there are places that are quite difficult to move to. This is excellent to give students the frame of mind.

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Portraits of Reconciliation

Portraits of Reconciliation | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, these perpetrators and survivors are standing for forgiveness.

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:35 PM

Rwanda is a genocide that many people don't even know about. Regardless of whether someones heard of it, they should still be aware of how people have lived their lives from that time. Some looking to forgive the people who did this, and others looking to gain forgiveness from those they hurt.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:17 PM

You hear about how people in Rwanda forgiving the perpetrators that killed their families, parents, husbands, and children.  They can say that they have fully forgiven them and that they are on good terms with each other or they forgave someone and that was it.  Seeing the body language that these people have together really makes it real.  Some people are seen awkwardly next to each other while others are touching, even holding hands.  Seeing the pictures of both perpetrator and survivor together after forgiveness has been granted can do a lot more than words can in telling what kind of relationship these people have together twenty years after the genocide. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:17 AM

In an almost unthinkable arrangement, these pictures feature victims of the Rwandan genocide standing with the perpetrators who often killed their families. In a genocide where most of the killings were committed with machetes and perpetrated by neighbors attacking neighbors, it is difficult to imagine how the survivors feel and how they can stand to forgive the killers. It brings up the question of what right do these killers have to ask forgiveness from their victims?