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Page for My AP Human Geography Course
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Why the side-hustle is key to Nigeria's economy

Nkem Ifejika meets with Nigerian entrepreneurs who show how the nation's economy is finding lubricants other than oil.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 20, 12:17 PM

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy. 


Tags: economic, laborNigeria, podcast

Rowena Spence Cortina's curator insight, March 10, 10:37 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

The shadow economy, the black market or the side-hustle; these are all names for the informal sector of the economy.  In many countries such as Nigeria, this is a way of making money outside their normal jobs to boost their income and try to rise above just getting by.  "It was my grandmother who taught my mum that if you were lucky enough to have a salaried job, that was just pocket money. The real money came from your five to nine."  If working 9-to-5 represents the formal economy, this BBC podcast (and accompanying article) are all about the 5-to-9 economy

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 14, 9:11 AM

unit 6

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(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages

(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"What language is spoken in Croatia? Croatian is now the 24th official language of the European Union, but there are disagreements about whether it’s a distinct language or just a slightly different dialect of Serbian. Serbian nationalists believe that everyone shares the same language, “Serbian”. But many Croats persist in making their national language as distinct from Serbian as possible. Listeners will discover how politics is intruding on language, and how it is changing the map of linguistic patterns in unexpected ways."

 

Tags: language, Croatia, political, podcast, Maps 101.


Via Seth Dixon
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CCRES's comment, November 6, 2013 4:06 AM
Baška tablet , Croatian: Bašćanska ploča, pronounced is one of the first monuments containing an inscription in the Croatian recension of the Church Slavonic language, dating from the year 1100.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 3:03 PM

This part of the world has been so mixed up for so long. Each country wants their own identity, language and name but the borders are continually changing. Although these fights seem petty to me (an American) I am sure they mean quite a bit to the people living in these areas. National identity is very important to humans in general. Where we come from is the basis of who we are.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:51 AM

Languages are sometimes a mystery to countries but mostly has to do with who's occupying these countries and where the countries are located.  Croatia is only a few countries away from Serbia so the fact that the language they speak may/not be close to Serbian is no surprise. Migration and other factors contribute to the language developed in specific countries.

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Border Walls

Border Walls | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Geographer Reece Jones discusses his recent book Border Walls, examining the history of how and why societies have chosen to literally wall themselves apart.  He gives a brief history of political maps, how international lines reshape landscapes, and how the trend towards increased border wall construction contrasts with the view of a “borderless” world under globalization."


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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 9:00 AM
listening to some of the podcast you can get an in-depth synopsis of this. the walls that divide our countries and even towns over time have all the criteria and/or reasoning. Great Wall of China to keep invaders from starting war, Berlin Wall to divide german supporters of war, America/Mexican boarder is to keep illegal immigrants from coming, fence in your moms backyard is to keep neighbors/animals out of yard. Walls all have the same concept of avoiding war, trespassers and privacy. this is seen in not only everyday living but in military use as well.
Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 4:49 PM
I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:52 AM

I found this podcast to be interesting because it seems as though the more popular globalization is becoming, and the more it grows, there are more borders and walls being built. By secluding the poor communities, wealthier communities could essentially cut them off to the rest of the globe.

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The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split

The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The division between Islam's Shiite minority and the Sunni majority is deepening across the Middle East. The split occurred soon after the death of the Prophet Muhammad, nearly 1,400 years ago.

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 3:13 PM

The two different branches in Islam are factors that contribute greatly to not being able to solve the problems occurring in the Middle East today.  This article gives the context on how the split happened and why geography played a role in what went on.  I think that it is very interesting that there is such a large number of Sunni's compared to Shiites.  Yet, the Shiites have remained influential in spite of the fact that they are outnumbered.  As the article says, a large number of Iranians and Iraqis (in the South) are of this branch.  In fact, Saddam Hussein was a Shiite and he ruled brutally over the country, killing people from each group (probably the only reason he could hold the country together was through fear).  Yet, Iran, in the other case, was not always Shiite, a invasion which occurred had the religion introduced to a once Sunni dominated area.  Yet, the European nations which came to the Middle East and divided it after the fall of the Ottoman Empire did not know about all this history, so when they divided countries they just drew borders.  In my opinion, because of the borders of the countries in the Middle East, as well as the rivalry between the two different faiths it is hard to hold such divided countries together.  

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 8:11 PM

The Islam-Sunni favors the father-in-law of Muhammad Abu Bakr and is strictly orthodox. The Islam-Shi'ite favors Muhammad's son-in-law Ali and it mostly practiced in Iran, southern Iraq and southern Lebanon. Sunni on the other hand is practiced throughout the northern part of Africa and throughout the whole middle east. In the middle east, 85% of the muslim population between Sunni and Shi'ite is Sunni and 15% practices Shia. Between Sunni and Shi'ite, Sunni appears to be the more popular and dominant Islamic religion.

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 31, 5:04 PM

The middle east is a topic of discussion for people throughout America. I say the Middle East in a broad sense because there are a numerous amount of topics one could discuss in regards to the middle east. Politics, violence, terrorism, the faith of Islam in general, the list goes on. But it seems not many people go into the Sunni Shiite conflict in depth. In order to understand much of what goes on in the Middle East one needs to understand the two divisions between Islam, why they exist and what has been the history/significance of the relationship. I wonder sometimes if the people reporting the news realize what they are saying, whom the people/groups of people involved are, and what the significance of there being is. The video shown in class involving the two news reporters discussing/asking questions  about the Middle East with a scholar on the show definitely proved people are ignorant to the Middle East. They painted it with a "broad brush." If they can't even realize the vast size of Islam and the fact that they are generalizing when reporting terrorism thus linking the faith of Islam in general to it then I can only imagine what it would do to their heads to find out that there are two main divisions of Islam. It's bad when the people reporting the news don't understand the significance of what they are saying. It raises questions as to how the American people, whom are not well versed in the Middle East, interpret Islam and its people. Reading articles and listening to discussions would certainly help educate people and honestly this "scoop" was very clear in stating the origin, meaning, and significance of the two different divisions.  

I find the oil situation in the Middle East interesting to say the least. The Shiite's are the clear minority in Islam yet they control 80% of the Middle East's oil. It is crazy to think how the Safavid Dynasty set up shop in what is now Iran... In time Iran would prove to be rich in oil. Other parts of the middle east that are extremely rich in oil like southern Iraq, the eastern region of the Arabian Peninsula and Lebanon are also Shiite. So in this case the minority has access to and controls an extreme amount of wealth. I'm sure there are people whom discuss the Middle East and oil yet don't know the religious aspects of the territory. Just through taking five minutes to read an article such as this an individual may form a different perception of Islam or specifically, in regards to this paragraph, oil in the Middle East. 

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Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style

Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"In April, the Associated Press decided the word 'illegal' should only be used to describe actions, not people. It's one of several major news outlets that have been reconsidering how to refer to people who are in this country illegally."  

 


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Al Picozzi's comment, July 21, 2013 12:53 PM
It all goes along with the old saying, the victors write the history books. If the US lost the American Revolution it wouodl probably been called the American Insurrection. Also look at the Civil War as we mostly call it today. Many places, especially in the Southern states call this the War for Southern Independence or the War of Norther Aggression.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:19 PM

I thought that NPR broadcast  was perpetuating the problem we face today in news media.  They spent there time talking about certain individuals and how they used their words instead of addressing and informing us about the issue of immigration. Labeling is an easy way of separating a human being from the situation, Illegal immigrant is easier to portray negatively in the news.  An illegal sounds better then a disadvantaged Mexican refuge in search of the same American dream our founding fathers were trying to create when the agenda is to close the boarders

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 8:16 PM

It is interesting to see that not only the topic of Immigration is controversial,  but the terms being used for that topic is also a sensitive subject.

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Mapping A History Of The World, And Our Place In It

Mapping A History Of The World, And Our Place In It | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
On the Map author Simon Garfield speaks with NPR's Steve Inskeep about the history of maps, how they can be used as political tools, and how GPS and modern mapping applications are changing the way we see ourselves and our place in the world.

Via Seth Dixon
Dean Haakenson's insight:

This NPR podcast is a review of the book On the Map that explores how our minds perceive maps and how maps influence or perception of the world we live in.  Here is the NY Times review of the same book. 

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Dean Haakenson's comment, January 8, 2013 2:12 PM
Love this. It shows how maps can shape our ideas of the world--Reagan usin the Mercator Projection to convey the idea that the USSR was a very large threat. Great for APHG students.
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, January 8, 2013 10:09 PM

This NPR podcast is a review of the book On the Map that explores how our minds perceive maps and how maps influence or perception of the world we live in.  Here is the NY Times review of the same book. 

g tonge's curator insight, January 9, 2013 4:36 AM

This NPR podcast is a review of the book On the Map that explores how our minds perceive maps and how maps influence or perception of the world we live in.  Here is the NY Times review of the same book.