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Teaching APHG with Live Web Maps

Teaching APHG with Live Web Maps | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Lyn Malone and Seth Dixon combined to present at NCGE 2015 on Saturday August 8th; the topic was Teaching AP Human Geography with Live Web Maps.

 

Tags: APHG, NCGE, training, edtech, GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 10, 2015 10:58 PM

I was glad to present in Washington D.C., and for any who could not attend, it was designed as a "first foray" into using ArcGIS online and chance to discover great web maps for every unit of APHG. 

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Map Projections

This video describes what map projections are, and how the Earth can be represented using map projections within a GIS.

 

Tags: Mapping, video, map projections, cartography.


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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:31 AM

Ch 1 Map Projections

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 2015 9:41 PM

Maps

Wade Lytal's curator insight, August 31, 2015 3:16 PM

Good video on map projects

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Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)!

Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)! | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 2015 6:45 PM

This is more for the teachers than the students since this is most certainly not a current pop culture reference.  Still, what's better than an interactive map displaying the locations where Johnny Cash has been while listening to him sing "I've Been Everywhere?"  (Tech support: Use Google Chrome or Safari to play and ignore the finger). 


Tags: music, transportation, mapping, tourism.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:08 PM

It remarkable how a map can illustrate in how many cities Johnny Cash performed in with his band. As a famous musician in the U.S., he targeted different states and his audience was diversity. Music gave him the opportunity to help people of all different ethnicties and social backgrounds. With his first band created in Germany, he continued to take his music around the world and especially in the U.S. His country music was most popular in the 70s and 80s and even now it can still be heard on the radio.

Blake Joseph's curator insight, May 6, 2015 5:06 PM

Musicians have the great privilege of being able to travel to lots of places in the world and being paid to do it. Johnny Cash, Steve Miller Band, and The Allman Brothers are three artist out of many I can think of that have written songs directly pertaining to their love of traveling around. While many other occupations travel immensely as well,  a popular musicians outreach and influence on people makes their traveling stories have a much more inspirational impact on people than say truck drivers or flight attendants.

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GeoFRED lesson

GeoFRED lesson | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Creating and Analyzing a Binary Map: This online activity demonstrates how easy it is to master key functions in GeoFRED.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2015 3:11 PM

Last month I wrote an article about how to use GeoFRED for the National Geographic Education blog.  Since then, GeoFRED was produced this lesson plan that will walk students through the basics of how to use the site and introductory mapping skills.


Tags: development, statistics,  economic, mapping.

Cass Allan's curator insight, March 1, 2015 2:23 AM

fun with binary maps. statistical data. figure it out

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Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources

Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Data is great, but working with numbers can be intimidating. We have more data than ever before that is available to us, and graphs, charts, and spreadsheets are ways that data can be shared. If that data has a spatial element to it, the best way to visualize a large dataset might just be a map."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2015 3:51 PM

I hope you enjoy this article I wrote about GeoFRED, a way to visualize economic statistics.  All of my future articles for National Geographic Education will be archived here at this link


Tags: National Geographicdevelopment, statistics,  economic, mapping.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:05 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 2015 4:54 PM

Data, data...its all about data!

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


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Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:04 PM

Different cultural religions and senses of place in America. This graph shows the diversity of religion around the united states as it varies from place to place. 

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Globalization, Corporations and Franchises

Globalization, Corporations and Franchises | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

McDonald's and Starbucks can be seen as emblematic of the forces of globalization and the 'victors' of process as forcefully displayed in this graphic.  The local distinctive menu (not to mention the chef with a flair) typically loses out to the replicable, standardized and the familiar.  How come?  When is this not the case?  How does this change economics or culture? As a counter-point to globalization benefiting the chains, see how 'Yelp!' is reducing chains market share.


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M1 ECOM - EJCAM 2015's curator insight, February 11, 2015 3:50 PM

Le graphique ci dessus  représente l'importante des entreprises agro-alimentaires américaines dans le phénomène de Mondialisation : concernant les ventes,  McDonald's arrive en première position suivi de Burger King et KFC. Mc Donald's est l'emblème de l'implantation américaine dans les pays du monde entier. 

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 18, 2015 5:03 PM

This article links to Unit Three through "Globalization". This image shows how McDonald's and Starbucks has connected different parts of the world. Even these two power stores are seen everywhere, and some may argue it can result in place-lessness, this image shows how it can interconnect different countries. Starbucks depends on 19 different countries to make a single cup, and gets products from some of the richest and some of the poorest countries. McDonald's is seen around the world, and adapts to the different countries it has stores in. McDonald's employs more than 1.5 million people, and makes $41 billion in revenue. These two global stores are examples of globalization. 

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 24, 2015 9:07 PM

Summary: This graph shows where Starbucks and McDonald's is mostly consumed, as well as the revenues that they make compared to other restaurants as well as the country of Afghanistan. It also shows where the resources come from that go into one cup of coffee. This graph really emphasizes how pop culture has diffused across the world, and how it affects economies and how it ties in many different countries into the simple process of making a cup of coffee. 

 

Insight: This is a pretty clear example of globalization and how things like food can spread to become a part of worldwide culture. This also shows the division of labour by showing where the coffee, paper, and sugar come from that go into coffee. This can demonstrate which countries are developed and developing through the division of labour.

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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 2015 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 

 

This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events. 

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GMO-Free Europe

GMO-Free Europe | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:44 PM

This map is the epitome of agricultural geography and the beginning of a series of questions such as why did all of Europe choose to be GMO-free? Or, does the proximity of European countries have to do with the fact that they share similar values (such as being GMO-free)? What does the EU have to do with this pattern? Because the EU chooses to be GMO-free, European countries are making a statement and consequently refining agricultural markets by refusing to import certain genetically modified foods. Agricultural geography thus shares some patterns across space- with all of Europe sharing simile agricultural policies. 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 29, 2015 8:23 AM

This is an interesting development that has major implications for the world and its food supply. The social and political buzz combined with corporate profits intersecting with morality about sums up this complex and diverse issue.

One platform is the compliance of companies using GMO's without placing it on the ingredient label. People clearly have a right to know what's going in their bodies, and to choose whether or not they want to.

Another is that GMO's are nearly everywhere in the food system, with some estimates that 70% of the corn produced is of this variety. For folks who want to feed the world and prevent hunger more efficiently this is a huge win. Think of the lives disease resistant grains alone could save.

But is it safe?

Other issues include, how crops that are non-GMO can be inadvertently cross-pollinated with those that are naturally grown. How is that being monitored, and who is doing it? Is it self-policed or are governments watching over this?

My personal worry is that we create a crop that causes digestive or nutrient issues that "infects" the food supply, or worse, we take the technology to humans with dire consequences. This will be one of the hot topics that will be debated for decades to come. Corporate greed versus what's right for the people of the world. Call me a romantic, but I hope we as society do the right thing and feed our planet first. Perhaps money can be genetically modified to have less of an importance in society.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:55 PM

Would you like to map out the GMO-free regions of Europe?  Looking for resources discussing the impacts of GMOs on society?  This is a partisan site with some nice resources for a student project. Additionally, in this NPR podcast they discuss how some American companies are trying to be GMO free in a GMO world.  

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


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Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 3:04 PM

I've seen this collection of maps a number of times before, but they are just as interesting and informative every time I look at them. It's really a fun exercise in seeing what phrases you use or how you pronounce certain words as opposed to the rest of the country. As a Rhode Islander, the bubbler/water fountain divide was of particular interest to me. I also found it funny that I have the vaguely Western/Midwestern tendency of calling "rotaries" (or what are traditionally called rotaries in my area), "roundabouts". This is especially curious to me, because I generally tend to think of that term as a British one. Could this possibly mean that a lot of British immigrants settled in the Western/Midwestern United States? Or am I just mistaken and buying into a poorly informed stereotype about British people?

 

Whatever the case, these maps are very informative and say a lot about the linguistic differences that occur even within one country. Now granted, the United States is a large country, so there is bound to be a good amount of variation. But it's still fascinating to me just how much variety there can be. The fact that when traveling, your use or pronunciation of a certain word or phrase can immediately identify you as an out-of-towner is very interesting. This is yet another example of the importance of doing your own research in order to avoid making incorrect assumptions. Just because all of the people within a geographic border may live in the same country, it does not mean that their dialects or colloquialisms are all the same. It does not even necessarily mean that they speak the same language. Different immigrant groups (because almost no country is impervious to immigration) settle in different areas and this ends up contributing (in part) to the different dialects and expressions that one finds within geographic borders. 

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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 6:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

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Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps

Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
RIO DE JANEIRO — Look at most maps of Rio de Janeiro. The beaches are easy to spot, as are the iconic ocean-front neighborhoods of Copacabana and Ipanema. In the middle is a vast forest.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2013 11:40 AM

A nonprofit organization run by current and former favela residents called Redes da Mare has started the first mapping program to systematically chart out the favelas for municipal governments.  We take for granted what having an address on a named street means in a modern society; it is a portal to public utilities, recognition with businesses and countless other social benefits.  Being left 'off the map' is synonymous with being left behind.  By finding their way on the city maps they are removing some of the social stigma that sought to treat them as if they did not exist.  


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, mapping

Caterin Victor's comment, January 26, 2013 2:06 PM
Even the shanty-towns are beautiful in Brazil
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 3:06 PM

Being left off the map is ludicrous.  It should be surprising how many there are,what they pick for addresses, and population statistics. Hopefully this will also help them to get aid for poverty relief.

 

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Market Segmentation

Market Segmentation | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Nielsen Prizm is a tool used by companies to analyze their customers spending habits, lifestyle choices and spatial patterns.  Using their Zip Code Look Up feature, you can search any zip code to g...

 

This is an interesting glimpse into how market research analysts view neighborhoods, geography and spatial analysis.  This economic and cultural data has a wide range of uses (albeit with some serious limitations). 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, neighborhood, place, economic, consumption, spatial, mapping. 


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CIM Academy's curator insight, July 17, 2015 5:13 AM

Segmentation is a key element in strategic planning. This article discusses the importance of market segmentation and provides some key insights. 

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27 Facts About Maps

A weekly show where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John shares 27 facts about maps.

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Ashley Burleson's curator insight, August 11, 2015 4:45 AM

This Mental Floss video is an entertaining rapid-fire hodgepodge of map trivia with some important educational content nicely nestled in there.  This 99 Percent Invisible podcast is another 'ode to maps,' but this one is more poetic about the value of cartography and personal in how it explores the qualities they possess.  Enjoy them both!  

Tags:  mapping, trivia, cartography.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, August 11, 2015 7:43 AM

Maps are awesome - need I say more! This clip actually covers a significant amount on the power / influence of maps through history.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 11, 2015 7:59 PM

Very USA centric but entertaining and makes you think about the taken-for- granted use of maps. We do believe them!!

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Social Progress Index

Social Progress Index | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The Social Progress Imperative creates a shared language and common goals to align different organizations and achieve greater social impact.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2015 3:03 PM

I think we all know that we shouldn't judge a country just by it's GDP.  Economic development might be correlated with development and social progress, but the outliers are so telling.  In this TED talk, we learn about a new metric designed to measure how well a society provides opportunities for communal and individual success.  Having lived in Costa Rica for two years, I'm not surprised to find that Costa Rica does much better on this index than it would if we were to use GDP or HDI as a way to measure social progress and quality of life. For a more detailed look at the United States, see Geographies of Opportunity: Ranking well-being by Congressional Districts.        


Questions to Ponder: How is the Social Progress Index similar to and different from the Human Development Index?  What assumptions are built into the system? 


Tags: development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica, mapping.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 25, 2015 8:45 PM

Interactive map showing different categories of social progress

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:34 PM

Summary: This article included an interactive map that was based on the Social Progress Index, which is an organization that measures how developed a country is based on the basic human needs available, access to education and healthcare, and personal rights and choices. The general pattern was that developed countries had higher amounts of these things, while developing countries obviously had less. This is similar, but more refined, than the UN Human Development Index, which measures more than just social factors. 

 

Insight: This model can go hand in hand with the UN Human Development Index, which measures the progress of each country on much more different scales. This has been more refined to social issues, but the same patterns can be seen in both indexes. 

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WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers

WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"As the demand for its products escalated early in World War II, the Army Map Service, a heritage organization of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, was losing much of its largely male workforce to the armed forces. A solution to the urgent need for replacements emerged when the University of Chicago’s Geography Department developed a course in military map making and began offering it to women’s colleges in the East and Midwest."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2015 11:19 AM

Women in science are awesome and we need to encourage girls in STEM disciplines, especially geospatial technologies...hearing this story of women in the past might help to inspire a future generation. 


Tags: mapping, cartographywar, gender, STEM, geospatial.

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2015 2:19 AM

I believe this article is very empowering for women around the world. It showed how in this time of trouble in America we took into account the women's workforce and started using it. This article shows how much women helped by making the maps for the male army that was off at war. This story should empower women int their fight for equality and inspire them.

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Evolution of the World Map

Evolution of the World Map | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Use our interactive In Charted Waters tool which shows information & visuals on how our knowledge of the world map has evolved.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:14 AM

History of maps

tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 2015 5:11 AM

Can generate some useful observations,discussions and debates in class

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:00 PM

It is notable that the world's map has changed much since the advent of cartography, and many believed that the Americas were part of Asia. This is represented in the map.

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Mapping World Religions


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:58 AM

This video puts world religions in a more basic form. Shows the patterns that religions take on a global scale, outlining the most prominent and least prominent throughout the world. 

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Changing The World, One Map At A Time

Maps have always been a source of fascination and intrigue. Today's maps, however, can also help to save lives during disasters, document human rights abuses and monitor elections in countries under repressive rule. This presentation will explain how today's live maps can combine crowds and clouds to drive social change.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2014 1:03 PM

On this day of giving thanks, I want to remind this community that geospatial skills can be used to help othersWant to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets made by people like you and me. 


Tagsdisasters, mapping, cartographyTED201, video.

Jon Olaizola's curator insight, November 28, 2014 11:55 AM

You can help!

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:47 PM

Tedx

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State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


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Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:04 PM

Different cultural religions and senses of place in America. This graph shows the diversity of religion around the united states as it varies from place to place. 

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Redistricting

How can cartography swing an election? Simple.
Via Seth Dixon, Mr. David Burton
Dean Haakenson's insight:
Thanks Seth Dixon for Scooping this! And thanks Mr. Burton for rescooping. Great lesson for government and geography.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 1:50 PM

This video is part of a fabulous TED-ED lesson about redistricting.  The redistricting process is far from neutral; we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectum.  Which map to you think is the best way to divide the districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?


Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census.

Miroslav Milosavljević's comment, July 27, 2013 5:56 PM
This great video example may serve students for a better understanding the term. Well done!
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:14 AM
this video shows the process from which political candidates win their respective elections. gerrymandering is an illegal use of power in the respect to redistricting and moving town lines in order to pump up voting power. this is an illegal action that happens countless times in elections and taper to higher powers. this gerrymandering idea takes the voter power to elect and puts it into the hands of the actual political personnel. by reshaping you can stack votes into one particular area this way you are guaranteed to win that district. this is where you see districts with these crazy shaped areas rather than nice square or other simple shapes.
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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 17, 2013 6:25 PM

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

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How To Find A Food Desert Near You

How To Find A Food Desert Near You | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A new clickable atlas shows just how far it is to the grocery store, everywhere in the United States. "Food deserts" are the focus of state, local and federal anti-obesity efforts.

Via Seth Dixon
Dean Haakenson's insight:

Great for looking at agriculture issues in the US and the debate over the local food movement v. supermarkets.

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Mapping A History Of The World, And Our Place In It

Mapping A History Of The World, And Our Place In It | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
On the Map author Simon Garfield speaks with NPR's Steve Inskeep about the history of maps, how they can be used as political tools, and how GPS and modern mapping applications are changing the way we see ourselves and our place in the world.

Via Seth Dixon
Dean Haakenson's insight:

This NPR podcast is a review of the book On the Map that explores how our minds perceive maps and how maps influence or perception of the world we live in.  Here is the NY Times review of the same book. 

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Dean Haakenson's comment, January 8, 2013 2:12 PM
Love this. It shows how maps can shape our ideas of the world--Reagan usin the Mercator Projection to convey the idea that the USSR was a very large threat. Great for APHG students.
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, January 8, 2013 10:09 PM

This NPR podcast is a review of the book On the Map that explores how our minds perceive maps and how maps influence or perception of the world we live in.  Here is the NY Times review of the same book. 

g tonge's curator insight, January 9, 2013 4:36 AM

This NPR podcast is a review of the book On the Map that explores how our minds perceive maps and how maps influence or perception of the world we live in.  Here is the NY Times review of the same book.