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The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts

The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"These seven maps and charts, visualized by The Washington Post, will help you understand how diverse other parts of the world are in terms of languages."

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.


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Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 10:35 AM

The world is extremely diverse in its spread of native languages. Yet only a handful are commonly spoken by the majority of the world, about 2/3. Over half of the world's languages are expected to go extinct because of the extreme diversity and the minimal distribution which means that in some places almost every person speaks a completely different language and many are dying as their last speakers do not pass it on to their children.

 

This article is relates to cultural patterns and processes through the geographic spread of languages around the globe and the increasing acculturation that causes the loss of many of these languages in our increasingly globalized world.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 10:35 PM

Its interesting to see just how many people speak the languages we speak everyday, and to see just how many people DONT speak it.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 5:34 AM

It is amazing to see all main languages in perspective to the world. Mandarine holding the top spot with 1.39 Billion surprises me but at the same time doesn't. There are 1.3 billion people living there in the first place.

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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


Via Seth Dixon, FCHSAPGEO
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 11:15 AM

This article links with Unit Three through "language and communication". These 23 maps range from the history of languages, which languages connect with which, common languages in certain places, different phrases used in the same country for the same thing, and more. Looking at maps to spatially see language helps when trying to understand how the world communicates. One of the maps that I found interesting was the "New York tweets by language". It shows how diverse that city is, and how people are still preserving their native language in a English prominent country.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 9:00 PM

Unit 2:

Shows how many languages are actually closely related. Whether or not they sound the same or are located in similar regions, many share the same origins. For example: many words in Spanish and English are the same due to their similar roots. 

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More States In America Now Joining Movement To Produce English The Official Language

More States In America Now Joining Movement To Produce English The Official Language | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Throughout in 2010, many says have actually argued if it must make English its formal language. To some, these types of a move makes sense specially considering that the almost all folks (about 80 %) know English because their main language. Regardless of this statistic, the ways a state which... http://www.newsyab.com/more-states-in-america-now-joining-movement-to-produce-english-the-official-language/


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Irvin Sierra's curator insight, November 12, 2014 10:18 PM

This article has to do with what we are talking about in class about languages. It has to do with the subject because in the class book it stated how the US does not have English as their official language, even though that's what basically everyone speaks. These states are tying to make a movement and make English their official language. I don't see why you have to make it your official language i don't see a problem with being able to speak other languages.

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The Second Languages Of Every Part Of The World In One Incredible Infographic

The Second Languages Of Every Part Of The World In One Incredible Infographic | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Some of these will surprise you.

 

Tags: language, culture.


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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, November 7, 2014 9:59 AM

any surprises?

Caterin Victor's curator insight, November 7, 2014 2:35 PM

It is never a second language,  my grandmother used to say : "As many languages you learn, is never to much, never enought".!!

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Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts

Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

A 'retronym' is a term specifying the original meaning of word after a newer meaning has overtaken it.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 3, 2014 9:06 AM

unit 3

God Is.'s curator insight, May 3, 2014 1:15 PM

Some of you might appreciate this article.. Darn I feel old! LOL

A.K.Andrew's curator insight, May 6, 2014 8:32 PM

Fantastic images for our modern day terms.

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Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia?

Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"This map illustrates the country's deep division – and why the protests might not be what you think. Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe?"


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 2:16 PM

The Ukraine is divided along Ethno-linguitic lines. Even within the borders of Ukraine there are contrast in the characteristics of local communities. Some identify with Russia, others with Ukraine. The borders of Ukraine are likely to change because there are such differences between its citizens.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:08 PM

Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Thousands of protesters in the capital city of Kiev are calling for Yanukovych to step down. This is a potentially big moment for Ukraine, as well as for Europe: Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe? What's happening in Ukraine is complicated and driven by many factors: the country's history as an unhappy component of the Soviet Union, its deep economic woes, a sense of cultural fondness for the West, wide discontent with government corruption, two decades of divided politics and a sense that Yanukovych caved to Putin.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 8, 10:23 AM

It is unfortunate to see this happening.  Ukrainians want to be connected to Europe not Russia.  The divide between the people ad the President is quite large.  This makes me wonder if Putin is promising Yanukovych with a monetary bribe.  Or if Putin is threatening Yanukovych.  

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The Great Language Game

The Great Language Game | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Challenge yourself to identify some seventy languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:59 AM

A game where you can test your knowledge of global tongues only by sound.

The knowledge of languages is important in movement especially for migrants and immigrants and participators in global trade.

Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 2014 4:52 PM

Make sure you look up the languages that you don't know to determine where they're spoken.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:20 PM

unit 3-- use in class

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Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages

Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Languages spoken by billions of people across Europe and Asia are descended from an ancient tongue uttered in southern Europe at the end of the last ice age, according to research.  The claim, by scientists in Britain, points to a common origin for vocabularies as varied as English and Urdu, Japanese and Itelmen, a language spoken along the north-eastern edge of Russia.  The ancestral language, spoken at least 15,000 years ago, gave rise to seven more that formed an ancient Eurasiatic 'superfamily', the researchers say. These in turn split into languages now spoken all over Eurasia, from Portugal to Siberia."

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NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages

NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world.

 

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Article related to the video available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/29/nyregion/29lost.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1317132029-I36HNrdg4+dXkbgUQXnK6w


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 10:25 AM

This article and video were very interesting.  They point out how a city full of immigrants can help preserver a dying language.  The work being done to learn about and preserve these obscure languages is great.  The fact that in New York you will hear language spoken more there than in their home country is astounding to me and very interesting.  This fact is key to preserving these language as they are from areas of the world were the technology level is much lower and less likely to be preserved.  It is also interesting as it shows where people are coming from to live in NY.  The city draws immigrants like a sponge draws in water and this adds to the cultural mosaic that is NY city.

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Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America

Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Although English is America’s common tongue, immigrants’ efforts to learn it present challenges to institutions and individuals alike. These graphics compare regions, schools, and communities where newcomers have settled to learn and integrate.

 

The interactive map feature of language and the accompanying spatial patterns reveal much about the major migrational patterns in the United States.

 

Tags: Migration, USA, statistics, language, immigration, unit 2 population.


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SaskatcheWHAT?!

"How well do you know your Saskatchewan slang? At Insightrix in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, we've got the prairies down flat!"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 12, 1:26 PM

Here's an entertaining clip on different regionalized vocabularies and a hint of accent confusion thrown in there.  The portrayal is over the top, but it's all local vocabulary that life-long residents certainly understand.  Here's 320 more Canadian slang terms for you (scroll to the bottom).    


TagsCanada, language, fun.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, March 29, 11:14 AM

Live languages are never as straight forward as the Royal Academies of Language would like them to be. Rules are crystallizations that get shattered in daily use.

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Do Different Languages Confer Different Personalities?

Do Different Languages Confer Different Personalities? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

LAST week, Johnson took a look at some of the advantages of bilingualism. These include better performance at tasks involving "executive function" (which involve the brain's ability to plan and prioritise), better defence against dementia in old age and—the obvious—the ability to speak a second language. One purported advantage was not mentioned, though. Many multilinguals report different personalities, or even different worldviews, when they speak their different languages.

It’s an exciting notion, the idea that one’s very self could be broadened by the mastery of two or more languages. In obvious ways (exposure to new friends, literature and so forth) the self really is broadened. Yet it is different to claim—as many people do—to have a different personality when using a different language. A former Economist colleague, for example, reported being ruder in Hebrew than in English. So what is going on here?


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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, December 3, 2013 3:36 AM

I guess it is more about being better equipped for life. There is a belief that those who know two or more languages are better equipped for life. It is not that they are more intelligent, rather it is about having a good social aptitude,  and being better communicators!

Irvin Sierra's curator insight, November 12, 2014 10:33 PM

This article relates to the subject of language that we are looking at in class because it conveys if different languages mean different personalities. We were talking basically about this last class where they're some words in Spanish that you wont be able to translate into English. It doesn't mean that people have different personalities it just means that people will be more comfortable with their first language rather than their second language. Language does not reflect on you by your personality but more as your background. 

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7 of the Best Dialect Quizzes

7 of the Best Dialect Quizzes | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
If you're feeling particularly nationalistic, or just want to see how consistently you speak like your friends and neighbors, here are all the dialect quizzes that I could find. Find out what your dialect most resembles, and, in many cases, help science at the same time!

 

Tags: language, culture, English.


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Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:42 PM

Enligsh dialects looks interesting! If I have a chance later, I want to know more about it :)

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 12, 2014 11:07 AM

Take a few of these quizzes and be ready to share your reaction to your results!

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City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:30 PM

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:59 PM

I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

unit 3

SRA's curator insight, April 19, 10:30 PM

Victoria Margo



This article really caught my eye because at a young age I was taught to speak spanish and english at the same time, and now that I am older I realize how important it is to know two languages. I will forever be grateful that my parents took the time and made my sisters and I learn something different while growing up.

Languages change over a long period of time and many times languages grow or die within time. Two main vocabulary words that I have not forgotten are Language divergence and Language convergence. Language divergence is the dividing of a language into many new languages. Language convergence is when two languages merge to become one. Both these definitions are extremely important when talking about how some languages will soon be extinct. I believe many languages have been endangered due to families and parents who do not continue speaking their language when they leave their original country/state. Language is very important to our world and society today. As stated from the short video clip, if you do not continue speaking your language then who will? I agree with that completely if you don't practice something over and over again how do you expect to get any better at it? This video was a great way to express the diffusion of languages and how families today still practice their language. This video made me think about and reflect on the video we watched in Geography class a couple weeks back because of the decline of all languages that we may not even be aware of. Many times it is hard to find older people who speak your native language but I also learned from the video we watched in class that it is possible if you are willing to try and continue something that is important to you. There are many different languages that connect to our world. 

I also liked how this article mentioned that New York is the city of immigrants, meaning New York is full of different cultures and unique language. Although this article/video does say that language has been endangered it can definitely be changed with a little knowledge of why this is happening. Geography and language tie in together quite well. I am hoping many languages can be saved for the future. 

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Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

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(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages

(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"What language is spoken in Croatia? Croatian is now the 24th official language of the European Union, but there are disagreements about whether it’s a distinct language or just a slightly different dialect of Serbian. Serbian nationalists believe that everyone shares the same language, “Serbian”. But many Croats persist in making their national language as distinct from Serbian as possible. Listeners will discover how politics is intruding on language, and how it is changing the map of linguistic patterns in unexpected ways."

 

Tags: language, Croatia, political, podcast, Maps 101.


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CCRES's comment, November 6, 2013 4:06 AM
Baška tablet , Croatian: Bašćanska ploča, pronounced is one of the first monuments containing an inscription in the Croatian recension of the Church Slavonic language, dating from the year 1100.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 3:03 PM

This part of the world has been so mixed up for so long. Each country wants their own identity, language and name but the borders are continually changing. Although these fights seem petty to me (an American) I am sure they mean quite a bit to the people living in these areas. National identity is very important to humans in general. Where we come from is the basis of who we are.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:51 AM

Languages are sometimes a mystery to countries but mostly has to do with who's occupying these countries and where the countries are located.  Croatia is only a few countries away from Serbia so the fact that the language they speak may/not be close to Serbian is no surprise. Migration and other factors contribute to the language developed in specific countries.

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


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Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 3:04 PM

I've seen this collection of maps a number of times before, but they are just as interesting and informative every time I look at them. It's really a fun exercise in seeing what phrases you use or how you pronounce certain words as opposed to the rest of the country. As a Rhode Islander, the bubbler/water fountain divide was of particular interest to me. I also found it funny that I have the vaguely Western/Midwestern tendency of calling "rotaries" (or what are traditionally called rotaries in my area), "roundabouts". This is especially curious to me, because I generally tend to think of that term as a British one. Could this possibly mean that a lot of British immigrants settled in the Western/Midwestern United States? Or am I just mistaken and buying into a poorly informed stereotype about British people?

 

Whatever the case, these maps are very informative and say a lot about the linguistic differences that occur even within one country. Now granted, the United States is a large country, so there is bound to be a good amount of variation. But it's still fascinating to me just how much variety there can be. The fact that when traveling, your use or pronunciation of a certain word or phrase can immediately identify you as an out-of-towner is very interesting. This is yet another example of the importance of doing your own research in order to avoid making incorrect assumptions. Just because all of the people within a geographic border may live in the same country, it does not mean that their dialects or colloquialisms are all the same. It does not even necessarily mean that they speak the same language. Different immigrant groups (because almost no country is impervious to immigration) settle in different areas and this ends up contributing (in part) to the different dialects and expressions that one finds within geographic borders. 

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The Geography of Chechnya

The Geography of Chechnya | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The Caucasus region, dominated by the imposing Great Caucasus mountain range and stretching between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, has long been known as one of the world’s ethnically and linguistically most diverse areas.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 9:27 AM

It is amazing to consider such a small area (the size of New England) could hold such a vast area of languages.  The mountainous region certainly helps in creating such diversity as it isolated villages from each other in the ages before modern communication and travel.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 2014 9:01 PM

This is an area of the world that I can honestly say I do not know much about. It is apparent why this would be considered "one of the world's ethnically and linguistically most diverse areas". With the amount of countries in such close proximity to each other I can see why there would be major conflicts. I do agree that we need to become more knowledgeable about this and all areas of our globe. Not just learning about a place when something bad has happened there.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:46 PM

This map does a fantastic job of highlighting the cultural diversity within Russia and the former Soviet states. Understanding how these cultural regions overlap one another is paramount in understanding the region's tensions and the repercussions that result including Chechen terrorism in Russia and even in America (Boston bombings).

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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!