Haak's APHG
Follow
Find tag "food"
1.0K views | +0 today
Page for My AP Human Geography Course
Curated by Dean Haakenson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rachel Phillips's curator insight, January 27, 12:07 PM

I've always realized that the food we feed animals had to come from somewhere, but I never thought about just how much there actually had to be.  We, in America, import so much of our produce, and it now makes a lot more sense as to why.  We use what seems to be a majority of our produce supply to feed animals that people will later on eat.  In reality, it seems like a waste.  We use so much food to feed what will later on become food.  As a vegetarian, it seems like a poor cycle, and a waste of so much food that could help a lot of people.  I would never try to force anyone to stop eating meat, but looking at this map, it seems that all that produce could go to much better things than feeding animals that are up for slaughter.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:46 PM

My uncles in Iowa grow corn for ethanol.  They have a small crop where they grow corn they consume.  It is literally the best corn I've ever had.  I'm actually surprised Rhode Island produces almost $4mil in sweet corn.  I'm amazed that Mass produces $100 mil in cranberries.  I've seen a few cranberry bogs close down.  We produce so much why can't we actually feed everyone?  

Diane Johnson's curator insight, January 28, 8:47 PM

Useful data for sustainability discussions

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial, historical and cultural components to it...here are some of my favorite teaching resources to use as Thanksgiving approaches."

 

Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:13 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the consumption of sweet potato pie on thanksgiving in the u.s. it also shows the production of these pies also. It is also interesting how the south is again labeled and stereotyped in a certain way of being irrelevant or redneck.

This map relates to unit 1 because it shows the functional regions of local sweet potato pie production. It also shows the parts of the south as the most consuming people. Again pinning the south as weak and less educated. This is a possible vernacular map also because of that.

Raven Blair's curator insight, December 2, 2014 7:46 PM

The home of the first Thanksgiving, Plymouth County, is one of three of the only places that produces cranberries.It is interesting how Thanksgiving includes multiple assortments of the geography of food production and food consumption.  

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, January 4, 6:49 PM

Culture Unit 3 - This map shows the spacial relationship of an aspect of thanksgiving in the United States. It demonstrates how even popular culture is not always same throughout a particular area or country. It may actually change around perceptual regions rather than formal regions.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities

40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Just how much of the world's cropland can we really call urban? That's been a big mystery until now.

 

Now, a study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters has an answer: Somewhere around 1.1 billion acres is being cultivated for food in or within about 12 miles (20 kilometers) of cities. Most of that land is on the periphery of cities, but 16.6 percent of these urban farms are in open spaces within the municipal core.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:43 PM

Is this a surprise?

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:57 PM

Unit 1-Nature and perspectives on geography

 

This article explains how rural and urban areas are in the same nature. rural lands and urban lands are close or combined with each other though farms. These farms are affecting cities when they are so close from the sharing of resources. Water is a problem in these places through water scarcity. Places already with lack of water now are sharing with farms just outside the city. 

 

This relates to the unit through judging both perspectives or rural and urban societies working and living together. The urban societies are affected especially when water is a problem alone and then has to be shared with farms. People have noticed many farms are near cities with 80 percent of these rural lands near urban civilizations. Although many people have different views on what is considered urban,  and if these farms really are in urban areas. 

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 30, 2014 10:04 PM

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Marianne Naughton's curator insight, October 19, 2014 12:07 PM

Feed The World ...

dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 2014 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
An international relations scholar is using her students' love of food to teach them about global conflicts. It's a form of winning hearts and minds that's gaining traction among world governments.

Via Seth Dixon
Dean Haakenson's insight:

Thanks Seth Dixon!

more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:37 PM

The way to world peace may be through our stomachs. Great idea!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:38 PM

The way to world peace may be through our hearts and stomachs. Great idea!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:58 PM

Vínculos Poderosos! Pilares da Geografia Vivida.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, locavore, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:04 PM
An interesting article to read, it talked about the genetically modified seeds and food that is created by companies and then grown by American and other farmers worldwide. This article relates to the globalization point that we talked about in class. The seeds are genetically modified here or elsewhere in the world and then sent to farmers all over the globe to grow for increased profit typically. Many countries around the world, especially third world countries, have food shortages and by genetically modifying food so that farmers can get a bigger harvest, more people will be fed and less would die to famine and malnutrition. Like David, I tried to keep an open mind and not choose a side while I was reading. The article did seem quite vague regarding argument points however it gave facts left and right which I found to be new to me and fairly interesting, learning that 70% of food that we eat has at least one GE ingredient. Time will tell if this has prolonged pros/cons I suppose.
Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:41 PM

I love the hard facts that this article presents, in a very unbiased way. I've heard many claims from 'both sides of the aisle' about GE crops, but have never in one article seen such a clear and concise representation on the actual truths (or myths) surrounding the GMO debate.  

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:59 PM

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?


This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   


Tags: regions, USA.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

French scallops cleaned in China then sent back

French scallops cleaned in China then sent back | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Scallops pulled out of the waters off the western coast of France are taken on an incredible journey that sees them shipped off to China to be cleaned, before being sent all the way back to France to be cooked up. Producers say its worth the cost.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 13, 2014 4:52 PM

This type of nonsense only makes sense in a world where the bottom dollar is the only way to way to evaluate decisions.  However, resource conservation (think of the food miles!), fair labor prices, and the preservation of local cultural economies are certainly issues that should be considered. 


Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalizationfood production, agribusiness, agriculture.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 22, 6:50 PM

this is crazy

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 7:03 PM

This makes absolutely no sense to me.  How does the freshness of the scallop even last a trip like this?  What is the transportation time back and forth? 

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2014 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

McDonald's International

McDonald's International | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tyler Anson's curator insight, January 21, 10:33 AM

It is really neat to see how McDonalds diffused around the world to fit in with local cultures. We've talked about this in class and how places such as India don't sell burgers that come from cows due to religious reasons. It is cool to see what foods different cultures see as the 'norm'.

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, January 21, 9:40 PM

This shows that mmcdonals is a global industy . there are many mcdonalds everywhere they put a spin oncertain diishes to match their heritage like in japan instead of hamburger meat like we americans use the use crabs.It just really shows how far mcdonalds was changed from just starting in america to being featured all over the globe

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 7:06 PM

I've lived and traveled to a few places especially Asia.  I've had the Ramen at McD's in Hawaii along with the Portugeuse sausage that comes with the big breakfast.  I've also experienced Japanese McD's.  It was nice to be able to find some of the regular food like a burger and fry at any McD's in the world, but I never ordered anything else. 

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How To Find A Food Desert Near You

How To Find A Food Desert Near You | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A new clickable atlas shows just how far it is to the grocery store, everywhere in the United States. "Food deserts" are the focus of state, local and federal anti-obesity efforts.

Via Seth Dixon
Dean Haakenson's insight:

Great for looking at agriculture issues in the US and the debate over the local food movement v. supermarkets.

more...
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global food crisis

Global food crisis | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Climate change, changing diets and a growing global population has pushed food security to the top of the international agenda.

 

Food problems are fundamentally geographic.  Understanding local economics, agriculture and development all play a critical role in contextualizing place-based shortages.  This interactive media guide highlights where these issues are the most problematic. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 12:39 PM

Neo-Malthusian point of view?