Haak's APHG
1.4K views | +0 today
Follow
Page for My AP Human Geography Course
Curated by Dean Haakenson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe'

Culture Ministry Affirms 'Russia is not Europe' | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"A state commission working on a much-discussed report titled 'Foundations of State Cultural Politics' will release their findings in two weeks, presidential advisor Vladimir Tolstoi announced last week, adding that the basic formula of the report could be summarized as 'Russia is not Europe.'"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 3:06 PM

I wasn't even really aware that Russia had ever wanted to seem like part of Europe, or that people saw it as part of Europe.  I've always seen Russia as it's own place, because it is.  It is not in Europe, it just borders Europe.  I understand how there is a misconception because most people don't see it as part of Asia either, because it seems much different than other countries in Asia.  However, it should be recognized as it's own place, and not as part of Europe.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 3:32 PM

Russia has long since been Europe's backwards, awkward cousin. On the outskirts of the continent, Russia has always been different in every sense of the world. Their religion is different, their culture is a unique blend of East and West; a history of intense poverty of its lower classes, followed by the Communist revolution and the alienation of Russia as a whole, has helped to perpetuate this idea of backwardness associated with the country. The Cold War and the Eastern bloc has left a bitter taste in the mouths of many Western powers, and Russia has continued to be culturally ostracized despite major economic progress in the nation and increased political and economic ties between the nation and the rest of Europe. Although Russia has fought hard to be considered a part of Europe, to many Europeans, it will always remain "other." Russia has done little to help its case as of late, considering its actions in the Crimea and the incitement of conflict in much of Eastern Ukraine. For the sake of the Russian people, I hope their situation improves for the better.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:44 AM

For the past few centuries, there has been an ongoing debate occurring within Europe and within Russia. The central question in that debate has been, is Russia part of Europe?  One of Peter the greats main goals was to make Russia a force within Europe. He attempted to westernize the nation. Successive Tsars followed his policy of westernization. The Russians were instrumental in repelling Napoleon during the latters ill-fated invasion of the Russian Empire. The Russian Empire was one of the leading powers on the ailed side during the first few years of World War I.  The Russian Revolution set off a period of harsh tensions between Russia an the rest of the western world. The rise of Bolshevism and the withdrawal from the war  created a great schism between Russia and the rest of Europe. Those harsh tensions continue  until this day. There have been ebbs and flows in the conflict,  but  for many in the western world, Russia is not a part of Europe.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style

Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"In April, the Associated Press decided the word 'illegal' should only be used to describe actions, not people. It's one of several major news outlets that have been reconsidering how to refer to people who are in this country illegally."  

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Al Picozzi's comment, July 21, 2013 12:53 PM
It all goes along with the old saying, the victors write the history books. If the US lost the American Revolution it wouodl probably been called the American Insurrection. Also look at the Civil War as we mostly call it today. Many places, especially in the Southern states call this the War for Southern Independence or the War of Norther Aggression.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:19 PM

I thought that NPR broadcast  was perpetuating the problem we face today in news media.  They spent there time talking about certain individuals and how they used their words instead of addressing and informing us about the issue of immigration. Labeling is an easy way of separating a human being from the situation, Illegal immigrant is easier to portray negatively in the news.  An illegal sounds better then a disadvantaged Mexican refuge in search of the same American dream our founding fathers were trying to create when the agenda is to close the boarders

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 8:16 PM

It is interesting to see that not only the topic of Immigration is controversial,  but the terms being used for that topic is also a sensitive subject.

Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Complexity in Syria

Complexity in Syria | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
A color-coded map of the country's religious and ethnic groups helps explain why the fighting is so bad.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 6:19 PM

This map shows tha tthere are an overwhelimg amount of Arabs especially in centeral Syria. And then on the coast lline it is mostly mixed with pink representing the overwhlming other majority.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 2014 8:11 PM

It appears from this article that Syria is a complicated country. The map shows the different ethnic and religious groups of Syria, along with other groups, all of which live within a small area. Syria, along with other countries within the Middle East have been faced with one serious issue or another. Many different people live within a very small area; those people practice different religions and are ethnically and culturally different. Unfortunately, being different in this part of the world may get you killed.   

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 1:25 PM

Maps such as this one are very valuable when trying to understand conflict.  In Syria and the greater Levant area, unbalanced power and representation in politics is the result of many different religious and ethnic groups living in such close proximity each other, allowing conflict to become very invasive.