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Haak's APHG
Page for My AP Human Geography Course
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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 3:06 PM

Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area which is very surprising because who is living in the rest of the area in Australia. What is happening to the natural sources and the resources that help the economy and where do they fit in especially in this map. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 7:02 PM

Coastal living is what Australia's all about. Why go to Australia to live away from the ocean? The major cities are all located on the coasts so thats where people want to be. Thats where every major event is taking place and where they can get all their resources needed to live.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:16 PM

This article shows how population distribution is uneven. 

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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


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lalita pradeep's curator insight, May 14, 2013 7:34 PM

wow....lovely map.........

Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, May 15, 2013 1:52 AM

It's quite amazing!

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 5:45 AM

When we first looked at this picture in class there was no way that I thought this map could be true. We are warned all the time to be careful what we look at on the internet, because for the most part a lot of the information is not true. When we looked at this photo in class we zoomed in on the area in the circle and first determined what was included  in that circle. Once we were able to detrmine what cities were within that circle we were then able to look up the population in each of those cities. We added up the total of each city to get the total population of the places within the circle. Then we researched the total population of the world. Once we were able to find this we subtracted the population from within the circle from the total population, and what we were left with was smaller than the total population within the circle. Which means that the map was true. I was shocked. There was no way that I thought this was true. What was interesting to me was the process we went through to determine that this map was even true. We had to detrmine the area we were working with and then research the information to get a solution. I think you learn a lot just by this simple picture. This map happened to be true however there are many picture listed under this map that are untrue that we are faced with all the time, that if we took the time to research we woudl realize are silly pictures. Just by researching information about a picutre like this can teach us a lot about a place. 

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.

 

Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 1:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 25, 3:42 PM

Pointed out in the latest report on Construction Industry 

Trends by Accenture, the rise of the Megacities will empower construction whilst raising many environmental and health problems.

Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 1:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

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Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.

 

This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?

 

Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.


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Rescooped by Dean Haakenson from Geography Education
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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 1:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.