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Haak's APHG
Page for My AP Human Geography Course
Curated by Dean Haakenson
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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


Via Seth Dixon
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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 10, 3:21 PM

Is very funny how Americans speak English differently from each other living in the same country.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 12:41 PM

As someone from RI, whenever I travel I always hear something about either my accent or my pronunciation of certain words. These maps and their trends were interesting to observe. I was surprised to see that crawfish was so different across the map.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 12:50 PM

This series of maps shows the small regional differences across the US, highlighting small cultural differences that are often overlooked. The maps show the regional boundaries for language and how it generally follows the different cultural regions of the country instead of state by state. The majority of the west usually uses the same word, while the south and northeast of the country often have their own way of saying things. After viewing the maps it's easy to see that the south tends to be the most different, using its own word or pronunciation that is different from the rest of the country.

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NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages

NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world.

 

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Article related to the video available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/29/nyregion/29lost.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1317132029-I36HNrdg4+dXkbgUQXnK6w


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 10:25 AM

This article and video were very interesting.  They point out how a city full of immigrants can help preserver a dying language.  The work being done to learn about and preserve these obscure languages is great.  The fact that in New York you will hear language spoken more there than in their home country is astounding to me and very interesting.  This fact is key to preserving these language as they are from areas of the world were the technology level is much lower and less likely to be preserved.  It is also interesting as it shows where people are coming from to live in NY.  The city draws immigrants like a sponge draws in water and this adds to the cultural mosaic that is NY city.