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Why Geography Should Make a Comeback in K-12

Why Geography Should Make a Comeback in K-12 | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Some educators believe that geography is subject that should go hand in hand with the STEM push.

 

Geography used to be a subject that was taught throughout the nation but somewhere along the line it got put on the back burner. Now, in California, educators are finding ways to bring the subject back and their methods may be of interest to parents and teachers beyond the West Coast.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, STEM.


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Nicholas Widaman's curator insight, August 31, 2015 12:45 PM

Geography is not taken as seriously in schools as it should be, but here are some reasons why it should be.

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The Geographic Advantage

The Geographic Advantage | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
We are living in an era of receding glaciers, accelerating loss of species habitat, unprecedented population migration, growing inequalities within and between nations, rising concerns over resource depletion, and shifting patterns of interaction and identity. This website provides 11 geographic investigations aligned to the geographic questions in the NRC Understanding Our Changing Planet report. The report focuses on the future directions in the geographical sciences and how these key questions will guide research to help us understand the planet on which we live.

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Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 2015 6:17 PM

This article by the AAG emphasizes that in order to provide a healthier, more prospering world, we need to do 4 things. These 4 things are: environmental change, promote sustainability, spatial reorganization of the economy and society, and harness technological change. This will allow us to create more long term and sustainable geographic patterns. 

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:02 PM

I really liked this article as it was interactive. I was able to pick out the area of geography I wanted to learn about and then it took me to another page that gave me more in-depth explanations. It was an overall good refresher on different aspects of geography with emphasis on how we react with our environment. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:22 AM

I definitely agree with the website that geography is one of the most important, if not the most important tool in understanding the world today. Geography is not simply just naming and understanding place names, although that is certainly important to geography. Geography is about understanding the social, political, and economic causes and consequences resulting from the nationally and artificially conceived barriers, borders, and places. This is why I think everyone should be required to take AP Human Geography. The classes exposes you to so many of the current events, problems, and implication in society today. As a senior, I thought I had already learned everything I needed to learn in my previous classes, and little did I know that I was dead wrong in my assumption. This classes has singlehandedly taught me many of the problems in the world today, and this class is the most useful class I've ever taken that can be applied to the real world every single day. I'm beyond happy that I chose to take AP Human Geography. I'm grateful for all the information I've learned in this class. But most importantly, I'm most thankful for the endless curiosity this classes has sparked in me to understand the world around me.

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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 12:01 PM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 21, 2015 4:28 AM

This is an alternative to using "Where children sleep" as an introductory activity. 

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Geography and the Common Core

Geography and the Common Core | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
In 2010, most states in the United States (including Rhode Island) adopted the Common Core State Standards as the new standards.   The two main portions of the Common Core Standards are the English...

 

Will geography be permanently pushed out of the curriculum with the adoption of the Common Core?  How can a teacher bolster spatial thinking and geo-literacy within the Common Core framework?  If you've asked yourself these questions, this resource is for you. 


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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:39 PM

This article is under intellectual/arts in the United States, because it is about education. It talks about how the standards of the common core are spreading and how this will affect geography.

 

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Scale taught in Comics

Scale taught in Comics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Such as a simple, powerful comic strip to teach the importance of scale.   If you prefer an image with a 'paper' look to it, try this image of the April 19, 2015 post of Mutts. 


Tags: scale, K12, location, fun.


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Karen Breznikar's comment, October 13, 2015 2:36 AM
Simple but effective method of teaching scale to students. Great resource.
Madeleine Carr's comment, October 23, 2015 1:32 AM
I would love to let my students create one of these using the website or by drawing their own. It is a personal way of thinking and I believe that students will be able to retain/grasp the concept of scale through this simple method. It would also be really enjoyable and would allow for creative students to express themselves in geography. Students could then compare their scales with others in the class and you could ask students who have had different yards/towns/country in their lives to share and enhance the enjoyment and importance of multiculturalism.
Matt Bond's comment, November 27, 2015 6:10 PM
Students today are interacting with cartoons through all different mediums from The Simpsons, Family Guy or even those in the newspaper. Cartoons can provide short but affective content transfer in an interesting way. They can be highly emotional and effective in all mediums which is why they are so prone into today's society, which is why as teachers it is important to use cartoons in our classroom to change up the sources in which we use.
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Circles of Latitude Craft

"Hands-on worksheet to play and review the circles of latitude from the Wise Nest."  


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 27, 2014 2:11 PM

I originally found this hands-on activity on Maps 101 wanted to make my own.   This is a fun way to make latitude more meaningful and memorable.  All the documents you need to recreate this, and to have your students make their own are available here


TagsfunartK12.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, March 28, 2014 7:28 PM

Easy to play with

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 30, 2014 10:08 AM

http://thewisenest.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Latitude-Circles-Interactive-Lines-WN.pdf

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All Over the Map: 10 Ways to Teach About Geography

All Over the Map: 10 Ways to Teach About Geography | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
We have created 10 activities for teaching about geography using Times content, all related to the National Geography Standards.

 

This is a set of 10 activities that all use New York Times resources are all connected to the National Geography Standards and applicable to any social studies classroom.  It's great to see geography getting this publicity in the NY Times, but it's fantastic to have these easy-to-use ideas for the classroom that are rich in content.  

 

Tags: K12, Geography Education.


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Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border

Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This lesson plan was specifically designed with Arizona examples and aligned to the Arizona state standards, but it be easily adapted.  I saw a presentation based on this lesson at the NCGE conference as was incredibly impressed.  Also, you'll note that like this one, there are many other lesson plans freely available on the Arizona Geographic Alliance website.  

 

Tags: K12, borders, political, landscape, migration, unit 4 political.


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oyndrila's comment, October 14, 2012 11:40 AM
I found very useful resources on the website. Thank you for sharing it.
Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an important lesson, especially for those who actually live in Arizona/Mexico and have seen the border itself. Learning about the Arizona/Mexican border is important and shouldn't be left solely to teaching it only in those areas. The maps included in the lesson plan are efficient and could be used in the high school setting.