Haak's APHG
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Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid

Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

"All Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants to do is make the world a better place for his new daughter. While he’s technically on paternity leave, he couldn’t sit idly by as India attempts to halt Internet.org, Facebook’s initiative to provide free but limited internet to the developing world."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 29, 2015 11:02 PM

India is a country with amazing economic potential, but hampered but uneven levels of social development.  The so-called 'digital divide' can exacebate problems for the poor and their ability to join the emerging industries.  In this situation Facebook is offering free (partial) internet access to India's poor and the discussions about net neutrality and the potential ulterior motives are underway.

 

Questions to Ponder: Do you favor Zuckerberg's proposal or do you think that India should reject this offer?  

 

Tagsdevelopment, India, South Asia, infrastructuretechnology.

   

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, January 2, 9:56 AM

Education access in  ALL  countries  has effects when not provided, equally!

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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 18, 2014 4:14 AM

It is sad to see the many different ways the poverty stricken and uneducated regions of the world are exploited, especially the children. Nepal is so poor that most of the recruiters for the predatory foreign networks are often locals who either take their relatives or abductees sent back to find a replacement. The animation helps add clarity and approachability to a bleak and difficult topic.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 2:33 PM

It's heartbreaking to see the plight children living in other parts of the globe, making me all the more appreciative of my uneventful upbringing in the US. Child labor is a practice that many Americans associate with the 19th century, but it continues to be widespread in many parts of the world, as is the case in Nepal. Educational opportunities are few and far in between for many Nepalese, who's short-term financial struggles rob their children of long-term opportunities for success. Many are kidnapped from their homes, or sold by their families to pay off debt with skyrocketing interest rates. The same also holds true for young female sex workers, who suffer an enormous amount of physical and psychological harm at the hands of their kidnappers and their clients. Economic pitfalls and a lack of access to education helps to perpetuate this cycle of abuse, as people are unaware of their rights in addition to lacking the education to advance economically in their societies. The Nepalese national government and several international rights groups are hard at work to combat these harmful practices, but they are fighting an uphill battle against an illicit institution that has ingrained itself in Nepalese society and culture. Great strides are being made, but much still has to be done for the youth of Nepal.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 1:22 PM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


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A City For Abandoned Mothers In India

Thousands of widows have been making their way to the holy city of Vrindavan in northern India to spend the rest of their lonely lives. Cast out by their families, or simply alone in the world, some travel hundreds of miles to get there.

 

Tags: gender, India, SouthAsia,  culture.


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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 10:10 PM

There are 15,000 widows living in the city of Vrindavan and most of them come from over 1300 km away; West Bengal. After their husbands death, these women have been beaten and tortured by their own children for money they don't have and have had to escape to this holy city for safety where, even though they are away from the beatings, they much beg and sing for money. Many wish for death over this humiliation. 

A woman, capable of bringing life into the world, should never be treated like this and especially by her own family. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:32 AM

It is crazy to think Indian families would abuse these widows, but what questions me is the reason to flee for spiritual fulfillment. I understand why one would leave because their family betrayed them but why spiritual fulfillment?

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Why leave the West for India?

Why leave the West for India? | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Rising numbers of people of Indian origin born in the West are moving to the country their parents left decades ago in search of opportunity and a cultural connection, reports the BBC's Rajini Vaidyanathan.

 

Since 2005, the Indian government has been encouraging people of Indian descent and former Indian nationals to return to India.  For many Indians living in the UK, there are more and better economic opportunities for them within India.   Migrants have many reasons for moving (including cultural factors), but the primary pull factor is most certainly India's ascendant importance in the global economy and rising IT industries. 

 

Perfect for talking about the changing patterns of migration...what this means for India's Brain Drain is interesting....

 

Tags: India, South Asia, migration, immigration, Europe, colonialism, unit 2 population. 


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 2014 1:37 AM

As the article says, India is encouraging more people of Indian descent to return to India because of the opportunities that have become increasingly available within the country due to its  westernization . Aside from the corruption and poverty that are in India, the country has not seen any signs of these opportunities stopping.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 9:42 PM

With the rise in globalization and the IT industry, it is obvious that there is opportunity for success.  Many traveled to the US for economic opportunity, however many companies and IT departments are being outsourced to India, thus taking jobs away from the US.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 11, 2015 4:16 PM

This phenomenon is a direct result of the rise of the Indian economy. Before the IT industry began to set up shop in India, returning to India was economically unfeasible. The development of the Indian economy has made India an attractive place to migrate to. If you are in the IT industry, there is more opportunity for you in India, than there is in the west. Culture is obviously another major pull for Indian immigrants. Throughout history populations have always sought to return to their native land. Especially first generation immigrants, who often never fully assimilate into the culture of their new nation.