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Disruptive Demographics

Disruptive Demographics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

Last night I had the pleasure of attending a tremendously entertaining and incredibly informative professional development evening at the APHG reading (that isn’t an easy combination to pull of either, and he did marvelously). Dr. James Johnson is a trained geographer teaching in the School of Business at the University of North Carolina.  His talk, entitled “Disruptive Demographics: Implications for Global Competitiveness” (PDF file available here) follows in a tradition of superb presentation at the reading; in 2012, Roger Downs gave a great professional development presentation on geographic expertise.

 


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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, June 3, 2014 9:45 PM
great overview of America's changing demographics!
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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?

 


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:15 AM

The statement is true. When the populations of the countries highlighted are combined, 51% of the world’s population lives in the circle. But, this is a claim that could be easily just put out there. We have to look at where the information comes from. In this day and age, it is easy to manipulate numbers, images and ideas. The media has become spin masters.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 2, 9:40 PM

This is a debatable map but I agree that there are more people living in the southeast area of Asia than people living outside of it. However, I also believe that the differentiation in populations is not that far off. I think China is more specific in the southeastern part of Asia because it has the highest population than any other country in the world. Also, Indonesia has the highest Islamic population in the world in comparison to other countries. As an added bonus, all of these countries in southeast Asia such as India, Malaysia, Japan, Taiwan and the Philippines are popular for its increase in manufacturing companies higher than any other region in the world throughout the past century.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:12 PM

After discussing this picture in class, I know that the statement is true.  I find it incredible that the majority of the world's population lives inside that circle.  I can't even imagine how condense living space must be.  I again am finding myself very fortunate to live where and how I do. 

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Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.

 

This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?

 

Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.


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Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


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jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/population-clock-shows-japan-faces-extinction-1000-years


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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

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World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

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LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 2014 5:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:27 PM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2014 5:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

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Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister

Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Taro Aso says he would refuse end-of-life care and would 'feel bad' knowing treatment was paid for by government

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Greg Hill's curator insight, January 30, 2013 1:17 AM

Tell us how you really feel

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:30 AM

Its clear that Japan is overpopulating. People are living long lives in a big country like Japan and people just keep reproducing. The Japense  minister in my opion is very wrong here. A minister should never wish deaths upon his people.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:11 AM

As populations age and the younger generations have less children the burden of government to provide care for the elderly becomes a big issue.  In countries where the government pays for their health care this will only become a bigger issue.  When the needs of the old and the needs of the young become a conflict what is a country to do?  These issues will only increase as the birth rates of developed countries declines.  

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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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Russians are leaving the country in droves

Russians are leaving the country in droves | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Over a bottle of vodka and a traditional Russian salad of pickles, sausage and potatoes tossed in mayonnaise, a group of friends raised their glasses and wished Igor Irtenyev and his family a happy journey to Israel.

 

My regional class has been learning about Russia this week and when I first started teaching a few years ago, I would teach that Russia had a population of 145 million.  Today it is 141 million and part of that is due to migrants leaving a country that they see as lacking in economic opportunities and political freedoms (another part of the story is that birth rates plummeted after the collapse of the Soviet Union in what demographers have called the "Russian Cross").  In the last few years the population appears to have stabilized, but there are still many who do not see a vibrant future from themselves within Russia.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Demographics, immigration, unit 2 population.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:44 PM

In the last 10 years about 1.25 million russians have emigrated out of Russia, but the way they do it is interesting. When they leave they dont sell their houses, or aparments, or cars they simply lock their doors and quietly slip away to the airports at night. The reasons for leaving are different thought, some are leaving because the prime minister is expected to return while some are leaving because of the awful econonmy. Either way the massive amounts of emigration is leading to a higher death rate then birth rate overall. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:23 AM

This article from a couple years ago is about Russian emigration. A large number of Russians were leaving the country for better economic opportunity. Some cite the overbearing rule of Putin, but the pay in other countries is just better than what Russia can offer. This was particularly the case for the more educated, another instance of "brain drain" hurting a nation which is already in trouble.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:00 PM

Migration occurs for many reasons. People move from country to country every day. Leaving Russia was this families choice and moving to Israel can have an impact on them greater than if they were to stay in Russia.

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Younger Africa

Younger Africa | Haak's APHG | Scoop.it
Across Africa, a continent where the average age is about 19, protests have flared against leaders who may have outstayed their welcome.

 

This interactive mapping feature compares two distinct data sets in an attempt to show that the two are correlated on the continent of Africa.  The base layer of this thematic map is demographic, noting how much of the overall population in a given country is under the age of 16.  The interactive feature with point data describes the political unrest or instability in that particular country. 

 

Questions to ponder: Does the cartographer 'convince' you that Africa's having a very young (globally speaking) demographic cohort led towards greater political instability?  Are there other factors worth considering?  What does this map and it's embedded data tell us?    

 

Tags: Africa, political, conflict, unit 4 political, states, governance, population, demographics, unit 2 population. 


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