Growth and development
1.3K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
onto Growth and development
Scoop.it!

Maya Angelou, Business Storytelling, and Being Human

Maya Angelou, Business Storytelling, and Being Human | Growth and development | Scoop.it

An interview with Maya Angelou.


Via Karen Dietz
Sushma Sharma's insight:

She was an artist 

more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:55 AM

I was so sad yesterday when I heard about Maya Angelou's passing. I've always enjoyed reading and watching her. From her I always learned more about humanity, dignity, courage, and character.


When I found this HBR post yesterday of an interview with her, I was delighted. The interviewer/author Alison Beard even talks with Maya about business storytelling.The interview is quintessential Angelou and I know you'll enjoy it. 


There is a little-known book in my library that I treasure for its wisdom -- Facing Evil; Light at the Core of Darkness (1989) -- that Maya (and many other amazing people) contributed to. Some of my favorite passages from her essay are, "We must remember the great struggle between majestic forces -- that that struggle introduces a dynamic into our intellect and into our souls. We are required to develop courage to care...We need the courage to create ourselves daily, to be bodacious enough to create ourselves daily as Christians, as Jews, as Muslims, as thinking, caring, laughing, loving human beings. (pg 29) Now wherever that lives in us--whether it's in the bend of the elbow, behind the kneecap--wherever that lives, there dwells the nobleness in the human spirit. Not nobility. I don't trust the word. I think it's pompous. But the nobleness is in the human spirit. It is seen in the fact that we rise to good, we do rise."


Angelou's view of story was in its power to unite. The end of her poem "Human Family" says, "We are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike." (from I Shall Not Be Moved)


Enjoy this article honoring one great lady, and the inspiration that lies waiting for you.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Halima Ozimova's curator insight, May 31, 2014 2:53 AM

Warm Words about the passed CELEBRITY...

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Mastering Complexity
Scoop.it!

Create Mentorships, Not Minions

Create Mentorships, Not Minions | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Today, the traditional paradigm in which a charismatic executive leads an adoring, less-senior employee where power is often misaligned won’t do, explained executive coaching expert Wendy Mantel of Mantel Coaching Inc. Millennials want close, meaningful relationships with mentors. They also want to feel empowered to be authentic, to create and embody their own career brands.

“Engagement, learning, growth, visibility, relevance and opportunity are watchwords for this generation,” Mantel said in an email. These needs are also important guiding words for learning organizations developing new, or rethinking, established, mentoring approaches.

Via David Hain, Ides De Vos
more...
David Hain's curator insight, May 10, 9:18 AM

Everybody needs a mentor - but not just any old mentor, or possibly the usual suspects!

John Ludike's curator insight, May 11, 1:50 AM
Accurate  pragmatic summary which is very relevant to modern day Mentorship efgorts
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, May 13, 2:17 AM
Share your insight
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from MILE Leadership
Scoop.it!

Doubt Provides Lessons in Leadership - People Development Network

Doubt Provides Lessons in Leadership - People Development Network | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Poor planning and organization can send your leadership down the River of Doubt. Roosevelt's journey provides lessons for leaders today.

Via The People Development Network
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Strange days indeed...
Scoop.it!

The 12 Steps of Taking Ourselves a Little Less Seriously -

The 12 Steps of Taking Ourselves a Little Less Seriously - | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Recovering a sense of humor may be just the change we need.
Via F. Thunus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Supports for Leadership
Scoop.it!

6 Secrets to Resolve Your Toughest Workplace Battles

When it comes to creating alignment, healthy conflict is really healthy

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from What I Wish I Had Known
Scoop.it!

When People Show You Who They Are, Believe Them

When People Show You Who They Are, Believe Them | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Oprah shares an important lesson she learned from Maya Angelou: When people show you who they are, believe them.

Via Anita
more...
Anita's curator insight, November 2, 2014 11:12 AM

This lesson applies to relationships of all kinds - personal and professional.

Joe Espana's curator insight, November 3, 2014 5:49 AM

Its a fundamental principle of engagement that people want to be valued for who they are not just what they produce for you

KwakJeongIl's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:52 PM

Have confidence to people who show you who they are, is very important virtue.

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Co-Adaptation and the Emergence of Structure

Co-Adaptation and the Emergence of Structure | Growth and development | Scoop.it

Co-adaptation (or co-evolution), the parallel feedback process by which agents continuously adapt to the changes induced by the adaptive actions of other agents, is a ubiquitous feature of complex adaptive systems, from eco-systems to economies. We wish to understand which general features of complex systems necessarily follow from the (meta)-dynamics of co-adaptation, and which features depend on the details of particular systems. To begin this project, we present a model of co-adaptation (“The Stigmergy Game”) which is designed to be as a priori featureless as possible, in order to help isolate and understand the naked consequences of co-adaptation. In the model, heterogeneous, co-adapting agents, observe, interact with and change the state of an environment. Agents do not, ab initio, directly interact with each other. Agents adapt by choosing among a set of random “strategies,” particular to each agent. Each strategy is a complete specification of an agent's actions and payoffs. A priori, all environmental states are equally likely and all strategies have payoffs that sum to zero, so without co-adaptation agents would on average have zero “wealth”. Nevertheless, the dynamics of co-adaptation generates a structured environment in which only a subset of environmental states appear with high probability (niches) and in which agents accrue positive wealth. Furthermore, although there are no direct agent-agent interactions, there are induced non-trivial inter-agent interactions mediated by the environment. As a function of the population size and the number of possible environmental states, the system can be in one of three dynamical regions. Implications for a basic understanding of complex adaptive systems are discussed.

 


Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Feeling empathy makes you a better friend, parent, leader, person

Feeling empathy makes you a better friend, parent, leader, person | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Parents need to model empathetic behavior and identify other people’s feelings for their children, says Lynne Sipiora.


Empathy is democratic because it enables you to see that every life is unique and yet deserving of equal consideration. Empathy drives transformation, supports collaborative efforts and creates change.


==================

Empathy drives transformation,

supports collaborative efforts and

creates change.

===========


Empathy is not “walking a mile in someone’s shoes.”

It is recognizing that they are tired, exhausted and their feet hurt and remembering when you have felt the same. And then it is offering them a ride or maybe a bus ticket and a better fitting pair of shoes.

Empathy first — feel it or learn it.


Change second.


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Change Leader, Change Thyself

Change Leader, Change Thyself | Growth and development | Scoop.it

Leo Tolstoy, the Russian novelist, famously wrote, “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”


Tolstoy’s dictum is a useful starting point for any executive engaged in organizational change. After years of collaborating in efforts to advance the practice of leadership and cultural transformation, we’ve become convinced that organizational change is inseparable from individual change. Simply put, change efforts often falter because individuals overlook the need to make fundamental changes in themselves.


Building self-understanding and then translating it into an organizational context is easier said than done, and getting started is often the hardest part. We hope this article helps leaders who are ready to try and will intrigue those curious to learn more.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 31, 2014 3:32 PM

Anyone who pulls the organization in new directions must look inward as well as outward.

Nadene Canning's curator insight, April 1, 2014 9:16 AM

Self-understanding ... feel, think, act, observe, listen, reflect, question 

Graeme Reid's curator insight, April 1, 2014 6:55 PM

Great article from McKinsey on organisational change and the need for greater self awareness.

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Ideas on Company Values and Culture
Scoop.it!

How To Answer: Why Do You Want to Work Here?

How To Answer: Why Do You Want to Work Here? | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Also, a good friend of the family has been working in corporate finance at JP Morgan for the last two years and he told me that the culture supports learning and development on the job – and really rewards hard work.” ...

Via Derek Draper
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Leadership Development Resources
Scoop.it!

Series: Leadership vs. Management: The Difference « Influencing and Problem Solving by Mike Lehr

Series: Leadership vs. Management: The Difference « Influencing and Problem Solving by Mike Lehr | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Series: Leadership vs. Management: The Difference « Influencing and Problem Solving by Mike Lehr http://t.co/HPyKv5zhlm

Via Claudia Escribano
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Leadership Development Resources
Scoop.it!

Leadership: A Sense of Purpose

Leadership: A Sense of Purpose | Growth and development | Scoop.it
It’s been said that 95 percent of business promotions are based on performance, but results account for only 10 percent of the reasons people follow a leader. The most common reason we follow a leader is because of who they are.

Via Claudia Escribano
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

42 Rules: Sharing What You Know

42 Rules: Sharing What You Know | Growth and development | Scoop.it
I know I’ve said this in my last two blogs, but I love this book. 42 Rules of Project Management may be short and simple, but there’s more wisdom packed between its covers than many books twice, even three times, its size.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Executive & Leadership Coaching for Performance
Scoop.it!

The Leader's Leverage: Coaching Conversations That Generate High Results

The Leader's Leverage: Coaching Conversations That Generate High Results | Growth and development | Scoop.it
One high leverage activity involves a leaders’ coaching conversations with a subordinate. When the manager spends between 10 minutes and one hour talking with a subordinate. What’s the return?

Via Willis Smith
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Mastering Complexity
Scoop.it!

Edgar Schein: Humble Leadership

Author and organizational culture expert Ed Schein in a conversation with Google VP of People Development Karen May.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Ides De Vos
more...
Ante Lauc's curator insight, May 29, 2:58 AM
I did meet Ed Schein 40 years ago at Harvard Univ.. We have changed in the meantime, but still we are humble.... 
How you can explain it?
Caylin Britt's curator insight, June 3, 8:33 AM

No intellect compares to that of the wisdom of a life long lived. - Caylin Britt

Gijs Spoor's curator insight, June 12, 9:17 AM
In times of Great Churning asking humble questions allows collective intelligence to be activated. 
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Strange days indeed...
Scoop.it!

7 Weird Ways to Stay Cool This Summer

7 Weird Ways to Stay Cool This Summer | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Save on summer utility bills with these quirky ideas.
Via F. Thunus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Supports for Leadership
Scoop.it!

Use Feedback to Spark, Not Destroy

Become the source of encouragement--to others and yourself--and you'll end up helping your business, community, and family.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

Teaching Practices Inventory Provides Tool to Help You Examine Your Teaching

Teaching Practices Inventory Provides Tool to Help You Examine Your Teaching | Growth and development | Scoop.it

Maryellen Weimer, PhD:

 

Here’s a great resource: the Teaching Practices Inventory. It’s an inventory that lists and scores the extent to which research-based teaching practices are being used. It’s been developed for use in math and science courses, but researchers Carl Wieman and Sarah Gilbert suggest it can be used in engineering and social sciences courses, although they have not tested it there. I suspect it has an even wider application. Most of the items on the inventory are or could be practiced in most disciplines and programs


Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, November 19, 2014 2:51 PM

This inventory, published by the University of British Columbia was developed by an impressive team from Canada, headed by Nobel Prize winning physicist Carl Wieman.  Fine research. Deep and worth the dive.

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Why Don’t Orgs Do Storytelling? 3 Reasons

Why Don’t Orgs Do Storytelling? 3 Reasons | Growth and development | Scoop.it
There are 3 common reasons why nonprofits don't do storytelling. Here are my solutions to these problems.

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 11:58 AM

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1DSMteK


It's 'nonprofit Monday' because I'm curating 3 inter-related articles on nonprofit storytelling. But the articles apply to any organization. I've experienced all of what is shared in these posts in both the for-profit and nonprofit world.


This first post lists the 3 reasons why orgs don't do storytelling, and offers 3 solutions to get the job done. I'm adding additional solutions based on my org story work in the trenches:

  1. The first piece of advice I have nothing more to add to: "Creating a culture of storytelling requires training, coaching and professional development for everyone involved in the organization..." Take a look at Tech Soup's storytelling winners to see why this is so critical. I've curated their post also for today. Without solid storytelling training any organization is going to produce lackluster results, and won't achieve their desired goals. What a waste of time and money. Don't let this happen to you -- get training.
  2. Don't ignore people's stories if keeping their identities confidential is critical. Change the names, change the faces, change a few details (yes, that's allowed in this case) -- and make a big deal about why you are doing so, because that's part of the story. People will love you for your transparency.
  3. One of the reasons people might not want to share their stories is because the stories are viewed as big pity parties. In other words, the stories are not deliberately evoked nor crafted with respect and clear boundaries in mind. How to evoke stories is not understood. Ergo -- back to point #1: get well trained in the dynamics of storytelling along with techniques in how to harvest, mine, craft, and embody stories.


OK -- there are really good points made here in this article that deserve reading, even though it was posted a few months ago. Tackle these 3 reasons that are stopping your storytelling so you can get on with making a difference in your business or nonprofit. Then check out the other 2 articles I'm curating today for more insights.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

deniseroberts's curator insight, September 30, 2015 9:25 PM

This article highlights the benefits of using storytelling in the nonprofit sector.  Storytelling can be used to extend your brands reach. 

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Diversity and Inclusion
Scoop.it!

Gender stereotyping in Indian recruitment advertising | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis

Gender stereotyping in Indian recruitment advertising  | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Gender stereotyping in Indian recruitment advertising - Recently, the National Council of Educational Research and Training’s (NCERT) department of women studies found some elements of gender stereotyping in NCERT textbooks. The analysis of 18 textbooks shows “men mainly in a variety of professions and women as homemakers, teachers, nurses and doctors”.
The report notes that “women are shown as teachers, cooks, doctors and nurses reflecting an extension of household work”. Men are “depicted in multiple professions, as pilot, artists, astronauts, magicians, rulers.”

Via Mona Dutta
more...
Mona Dutta's curator insight, August 11, 2014 3:35 AM

Gender stereotypes, like most stereotypes are the manifestation of the perceivers’ observation of a particular group indulging in a specific behaviour, activity over a period of time. Eventually, these stereotypes get re-enforced by cognitive and social mechanism. Research on analysis of NCERT textbooks shows gender stereotyping. The traditional “women belongs to hearth” stereotypical attitude has deep cultural roots. Further research in organisations in India found male managers are stereotyped as working in production, sales whereas women are stereotyped as working in ‘soft fields’ like HR, PR.  These stereotypes relegate women to a secondary position in most Indian corporations. The Indian manager is a vehement proponent of the ‘think manager-think male’ ideology, more so than his international counterparts. Most people are unaware of the role played by mass media in perpetuating and reinforcing stereotypical notions in recruitment advertisement. Most organizations talking of equal opportunities and gender diversity play lip service and Recruitment advertising exposes their real intentions. The findings of the study prove beyond doubt that gender stereotyping is being used as a tool for selection and expulsion by Indian employers as illustrated by the numerous examples in the study. Unless some stern action is taken to curb it at the recruitment stage, all other measures will just be shadow dressing.

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from SCUP Links
Scoop.it!

Transforming in an Age of Disruptive Change: Part 2 - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo

Transforming in an Age of Disruptive Change: Part 2 - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo | Growth and development | Scoop.it

Donald Norris, Robert Brodnick, Paul Lefrere, Joseph Gilmour, and Linda Baer (of Strategic Initiatives and more), recently scanned the past 17 years of change in higher education (a highly praised summary, by the way, which you can download here (PDF), and then the current environment for higher education.

This week, they look ahead at opportunities for resilience and transformation.


"Transforming in an Age of Disruptive Change: Part 2," Planning for Higher Education(2013, v41n2).


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
more...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, February 22, 2013 7:49 AM

Can be downloaded for free through Thursday, February 28 only.

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Ideas on Company Values and Culture
Scoop.it!

Setting Company Culture? You Better Understand Employee Motivation

Setting Company Culture? You Better Understand Employee Motivation | Growth and development | Scoop.it
People in the business community love their clichés. “There’s no ‘I’ in team,” “work smarter, not harder,” and my personal favorite, “think outside the box.” Ugh. When it … (Setting Company Culture?

Via Derek Draper
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Leadership Development Resources
Scoop.it!

Four Ways to Lead from the Middle

Four Ways to Lead from the Middle | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Our ability to make a positive impact in the world does not necessitate a leadership position. Opportunities may come along and it only requires a certain set of behaviors that define leaders from ...

Via Claudia Escribano
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Leadership Development Resources
Scoop.it!

4 Myths About Success to Ignore

4 Myths About Success to Ignore | Growth and development | Scoop.it
When you're running a business, it's tempting to fall for get-successful-quick schemes. Here are four so-called success strategies that can easily backfire.

Via Claudia Escribano
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Leadership Development Resources
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Underrated Leadership Traits

Top 10 Underrated Leadership Traits | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Every boss has room for improvement. Get started by analyzing which of these traits you might lack.

Via Claudia Escribano
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Executive & Leadership Coaching for Performance
Scoop.it!

Study Says Positive Coaching Lights Up Our Brains

Study Says Positive Coaching Lights Up Our Brains | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Future-oriented questions empower students more than focusing current skills.

Via Willis Smith
more...
No comment yet.