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Teacher quits over emphasis on standardized tests: 'It takes the joy out of learning' - TODAY.com

Teacher quits over emphasis on standardized tests: 'It takes the joy out of learning' - TODAY.com | Growth and development | Scoop.it

A teacher in Massachusetts who has spent more than a quarter century in the classroom is drawing attention after she quit her job over her growing frustration with the school system’s emphasis on standardized testing.

 

Because of “so many things that pulled me away from the classroom and fractured my time with the children,” kindergarten teacher Susan Sluyter quit last month. 

“It takes the joy out of learning for the children," she told TODAY. "It takes the joy out of teaching.”


Via Dennis T OConnor
Sushma Sharma's insight:

The way to go .... Totally in agreement .. The joy of learning creates wisdom 

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Patrice McDonough's curator insight, April 1, 10:32 PM

Unfortunately this is the style of learning in China, where my teachers come from.   I have been told to take the fun out of the learning to concentrate on giving only useful information.  It has taken the joy out of my teaching...or can I be subversive???  

Aunty Alice's curator insight, April 6, 3:25 PM

Have a very similar mindset but short of opening one's own school we are stuck with it. I have just published a book leading teachers to the more fertile ground for real progress, in literacy acquisition,  of analysing student work, giving them an authentic voice, and goal setting.  It puts listening and speaking at the centre.

Dr. Richard NeSmith's curator insight, April 6, 7:28 PM

Will we ever learn in America? uhmmm...that is a rhetorical question, btw.   ;-) 

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Use Feedback to Spark, Not Destroy

Become the source of encouragement--to others and yourself--and you'll end up helping your business, community, and family.

Via Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D.
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Teaching Practices Inventory Provides Tool to Help You Examine Your Teaching

Teaching Practices Inventory Provides Tool to Help You Examine Your Teaching | Growth and development | Scoop.it

Maryellen Weimer, PhD:

 

Here’s a great resource: the Teaching Practices Inventory. It’s an inventory that lists and scores the extent to which research-based teaching practices are being used. It’s been developed for use in math and science courses, but researchers Carl Wieman and Sarah Gilbert suggest it can be used in engineering and social sciences courses, although they have not tested it there. I suspect it has an even wider application. Most of the items on the inventory are or could be practiced in most disciplines and programs


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, November 19, 2:51 PM

This inventory, published by the University of British Columbia was developed by an impressive team from Canada, headed by Nobel Prize winning physicist Carl Wieman.  Fine research. Deep and worth the dive.

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Why Don’t Orgs Do Storytelling? 3 Reasons

Why Don’t Orgs Do Storytelling? 3 Reasons | Growth and development | Scoop.it
There are 3 common reasons why nonprofits don't do storytelling. Here are my solutions to these problems.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, November 3, 11:58 AM

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1DSMteK


It's 'nonprofit Monday' because I'm curating 3 inter-related articles on nonprofit storytelling. But the articles apply to any organization. I've experienced all of what is shared in these posts in both the for-profit and nonprofit world.


This first post lists the 3 reasons why orgs don't do storytelling, and offers 3 solutions to get the job done. I'm adding additional solutions based on my org story work in the trenches:

  1. The first piece of advice I have nothing more to add to: "Creating a culture of storytelling requires training, coaching and professional development for everyone involved in the organization..." Take a look at Tech Soup's storytelling winners to see why this is so critical. I've curated their post also for today. Without solid storytelling training any organization is going to produce lackluster results, and won't achieve their desired goals. What a waste of time and money. Don't let this happen to you -- get training.
  2. Don't ignore people's stories if keeping their identities confidential is critical. Change the names, change the faces, change a few details (yes, that's allowed in this case) -- and make a big deal about why you are doing so, because that's part of the story. People will love you for your transparency.
  3. One of the reasons people might not want to share their stories is because the stories are viewed as big pity parties. In other words, the stories are not deliberately evoked nor crafted with respect and clear boundaries in mind. How to evoke stories is not understood. Ergo -- back to point #1: get well trained in the dynamics of storytelling along with techniques in how to harvest, mine, craft, and embody stories.


OK -- there are really good points made here in this article that deserve reading, even though it was posted a few months ago. Tackle these 3 reasons that are stopping your storytelling so you can get on with making a difference in your business or nonprofit. Then check out the other 2 articles I'm curating today for more insights.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Gender stereotyping in Indian recruitment advertising | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis

Gender stereotyping in Indian recruitment advertising  | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Gender stereotyping in Indian recruitment advertising - Recently, the National Council of Educational Research and Training’s (NCERT) department of women studies found some elements of gender stereotyping in NCERT textbooks. The analysis of 18 textbooks shows “men mainly in a variety of professions and women as homemakers, teachers, nurses and doctors”.
The report notes that “women are shown as teachers, cooks, doctors and nurses reflecting an extension of household work”. Men are “depicted in multiple professions, as pilot, artists, astronauts, magicians, rulers.”

Via Mona Dutta
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Mona Dutta's curator insight, August 11, 3:35 AM

Gender stereotypes, like most stereotypes are the manifestation of the perceivers’ observation of a particular group indulging in a specific behaviour, activity over a period of time. Eventually, these stereotypes get re-enforced by cognitive and social mechanism. Research on analysis of NCERT textbooks shows gender stereotyping. The traditional “women belongs to hearth” stereotypical attitude has deep cultural roots. Further research in organisations in India found male managers are stereotyped as working in production, sales whereas women are stereotyped as working in ‘soft fields’ like HR, PR.  These stereotypes relegate women to a secondary position in most Indian corporations. The Indian manager is a vehement proponent of the ‘think manager-think male’ ideology, more so than his international counterparts. Most people are unaware of the role played by mass media in perpetuating and reinforcing stereotypical notions in recruitment advertisement. Most organizations talking of equal opportunities and gender diversity play lip service and Recruitment advertising exposes their real intentions. The findings of the study prove beyond doubt that gender stereotyping is being used as a tool for selection and expulsion by Indian employers as illustrated by the numerous examples in the study. Unless some stern action is taken to curb it at the recruitment stage, all other measures will just be shadow dressing.

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Transforming in an Age of Disruptive Change: Part 2 - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo

Transforming in an Age of Disruptive Change: Part 2 - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo | Growth and development | Scoop.it

Donald Norris, Robert Brodnick, Paul Lefrere, Joseph Gilmour, and Linda Baer (of Strategic Initiatives and more), recently scanned the past 17 years of change in higher education (a highly praised summary, by the way, which you can download here (PDF), and then the current environment for higher education.

This week, they look ahead at opportunities for resilience and transformation.


"Transforming in an Age of Disruptive Change: Part 2," Planning for Higher Education(2013, v41n2).


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, February 22, 2013 7:49 AM

Can be downloaded for free through Thursday, February 28 only.

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Ideas on Company Values and Culture
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Setting Company Culture? You Better Understand Employee Motivation

Setting Company Culture? You Better Understand Employee Motivation | Growth and development | Scoop.it
People in the business community love their clichés. “There’s no ‘I’ in team,” “work smarter, not harder,” and my personal favorite, “think outside the box.” Ugh. When it … (Setting Company Culture?

Via Derek Draper
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Four Ways to Lead from the Middle

Four Ways to Lead from the Middle | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Our ability to make a positive impact in the world does not necessitate a leadership position. Opportunities may come along and it only requires a certain set of behaviors that define leaders from ...

Via Claudia Escribano
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4 Myths About Success to Ignore

4 Myths About Success to Ignore | Growth and development | Scoop.it
When you're running a business, it's tempting to fall for get-successful-quick schemes. Here are four so-called success strategies that can easily backfire.

Via Claudia Escribano
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Top 10 Underrated Leadership Traits

Top 10 Underrated Leadership Traits | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Every boss has room for improvement. Get started by analyzing which of these traits you might lack.

Via Claudia Escribano
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Study Says Positive Coaching Lights Up Our Brains

Study Says Positive Coaching Lights Up Our Brains | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Future-oriented questions empower students more than focusing current skills.

Via Willis Smith
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Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Executive & Leadership Coaching for Performance
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Coaching: 3 Keys To Improve The Teams You Lead

Coaching: 3 Keys To Improve The Teams You Lead | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Coaching has achieved buzzword status in business circles. As with many ideas that acquire this near-mythical standing, there’s a core of effectiveness behind their elevated reputation. But to get there, you've got to cut through a lot of hype...

Via Willis Smith
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Forget Command and Control--Try Connect and Inspire

Without open, inclusive, collaborative leadership, innovation simply can't thrive.

Via Willis Smith
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Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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6 Steps: How Leaders Can Tell a Great Story

6 Steps: How Leaders Can Tell a Great Story | Growth and development | Scoop.it
It’s a skill every leader needs to master.

 

"We tell stories to our coworkers and peers all the time — to persuade someone to support our project, to explain to an employee how he might improve, or to inspire a team that is facing challenges. It’s an essential skill, but what makes a compelling story in a business context? And how can you improve your ability to tell stories that persuade?"


Via Gregg Morris, Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 31, 2:57 PM

What a great article with real practical advice!  All the steps are here for any leader to follow to become a better storyteller.


And I really like the 2 case studies shared. Not only are they written as as stories (an uncommon experience), they are terrific examples of 2 ways stories have been used by leaders and the results that occurred. 


Many thanks to fellow curator @Gregg Morris for finding and sharing this piece.

Carol Sherriff's curator insight, August 1, 11:31 AM

Harvard Business Review blog that brings together advice from both marketing and evolutionary biology to provide tips on how to tell a great story.

Daniela's curator insight, September 12, 6:31 PM

Herramientas y detalles de como podemos contar bien las historias.

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6 Secrets to Resolve Your Toughest Workplace Battles

When it comes to creating alignment, healthy conflict is really healthy

Via Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D.
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When People Show You Who They Are, Believe Them

When People Show You Who They Are, Believe Them | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Oprah shares an important lesson she learned from Maya Angelou: When people show you who they are, believe them.

Via Anita
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Anita's curator insight, November 2, 11:12 AM

This lesson applies to relationships of all kinds - personal and professional.

Joe Espana's curator insight, November 3, 5:49 AM

Its a fundamental principle of engagement that people want to be valued for who they are not just what they produce for you

KwakJeongIl's curator insight, November 6, 8:52 PM

Have confidence to people who show you who they are, is very important virtue.

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Social Foraging
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Co-Adaptation and the Emergence of Structure

Co-Adaptation and the Emergence of Structure | Growth and development | Scoop.it

Co-adaptation (or co-evolution), the parallel feedback process by which agents continuously adapt to the changes induced by the adaptive actions of other agents, is a ubiquitous feature of complex adaptive systems, from eco-systems to economies. We wish to understand which general features of complex systems necessarily follow from the (meta)-dynamics of co-adaptation, and which features depend on the details of particular systems. To begin this project, we present a model of co-adaptation (“The Stigmergy Game”) which is designed to be as a priori featureless as possible, in order to help isolate and understand the naked consequences of co-adaptation. In the model, heterogeneous, co-adapting agents, observe, interact with and change the state of an environment. Agents do not, ab initio, directly interact with each other. Agents adapt by choosing among a set of random “strategies,” particular to each agent. Each strategy is a complete specification of an agent's actions and payoffs. A priori, all environmental states are equally likely and all strategies have payoffs that sum to zero, so without co-adaptation agents would on average have zero “wealth”. Nevertheless, the dynamics of co-adaptation generates a structured environment in which only a subset of environmental states appear with high probability (niches) and in which agents accrue positive wealth. Furthermore, although there are no direct agent-agent interactions, there are induced non-trivial inter-agent interactions mediated by the environment. As a function of the population size and the number of possible environmental states, the system can be in one of three dynamical regions. Implications for a basic understanding of complex adaptive systems are discussed.

 


Via Ashish Umre
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Feeling empathy makes you a better friend, parent, leader, person

Feeling empathy makes you a better friend, parent, leader, person | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Parents need to model empathetic behavior and identify other people’s feelings for their children, says Lynne Sipiora.


Empathy is democratic because it enables you to see that every life is unique and yet deserving of equal consideration. Empathy drives transformation, supports collaborative efforts and creates change.


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Empathy drives transformation,

supports collaborative efforts and

creates change.

===========


Empathy is not “walking a mile in someone’s shoes.”

It is recognizing that they are tired, exhausted and their feet hurt and remembering when you have felt the same. And then it is offering them a ride or maybe a bus ticket and a better fitting pair of shoes.

Empathy first — feel it or learn it.


Change second.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Change Leader, Change Thyself

Change Leader, Change Thyself | Growth and development | Scoop.it

Leo Tolstoy, the Russian novelist, famously wrote, “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”


Tolstoy’s dictum is a useful starting point for any executive engaged in organizational change. After years of collaborating in efforts to advance the practice of leadership and cultural transformation, we’ve become convinced that organizational change is inseparable from individual change. Simply put, change efforts often falter because individuals overlook the need to make fundamental changes in themselves.


Building self-understanding and then translating it into an organizational context is easier said than done, and getting started is often the hardest part. We hope this article helps leaders who are ready to try and will intrigue those curious to learn more.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 31, 3:32 PM

Anyone who pulls the organization in new directions must look inward as well as outward.

Nadene Canning's curator insight, April 1, 9:16 AM

Self-understanding ... feel, think, act, observe, listen, reflect, question 

Graeme Reid's curator insight, April 1, 6:55 PM

Great article from McKinsey on organisational change and the need for greater self awareness.

Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Ideas on Company Values and Culture
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How To Answer: Why Do You Want to Work Here?

How To Answer: Why Do You Want to Work Here? | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Also, a good friend of the family has been working in corporate finance at JP Morgan for the last two years and he told me that the culture supports learning and development on the job – and really rewards hard work.” ...

Via Derek Draper
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Series: Leadership vs. Management: The Difference « Influencing and Problem Solving by Mike Lehr

Series: Leadership vs. Management: The Difference « Influencing and Problem Solving by Mike Lehr | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Series: Leadership vs. Management: The Difference « Influencing and Problem Solving by Mike Lehr http://t.co/HPyKv5zhlm

Via Claudia Escribano
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Leadership: A Sense of Purpose

Leadership: A Sense of Purpose | Growth and development | Scoop.it
It’s been said that 95 percent of business promotions are based on performance, but results account for only 10 percent of the reasons people follow a leader. The most common reason we follow a leader is because of who they are.

Via Claudia Escribano
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Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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42 Rules: Sharing What You Know

42 Rules: Sharing What You Know | Growth and development | Scoop.it
I know I’ve said this in my last two blogs, but I love this book. 42 Rules of Project Management may be short and simple, but there’s more wisdom packed between its covers than many books twice, even three times, its size.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Rescooped by Sushma Sharma from Executive & Leadership Coaching for Performance
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The Leader's Leverage: Coaching Conversations That Generate High Results

The Leader's Leverage: Coaching Conversations That Generate High Results | Growth and development | Scoop.it
One high leverage activity involves a leaders’ coaching conversations with a subordinate. When the manager spends between 10 minutes and one hour talking with a subordinate. What’s the return?

Via Willis Smith
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Everything You Need to Know About Giving Negative Feedback

Everything You Need to Know About Giving Negative Feedback | Growth and development | Scoop.it
We’ve published a lot about it.

Via Willis Smith
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Mentor Them!

Mentor Them! | Growth and development | Scoop.it
Expert tips on how to effectively mentor your employees to maximize productivity, boost self-esteem, and bolster performance.

Via Willis Smith
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