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Why Most Startups Fail | Doing business in Ireland

Why Most Startups Fail | Doing business in Ireland | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
Building a better mousetrap is a waste of time if nobody knows it exists. Why do some startups succeed while similar startups with similar products languish and die?
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Introducing the One Hour Business Plan

Introducing the One Hour Business Plan | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
Writing a business plan can be painful: I don’t know anybody who likes writing their business plan, it is a task most people avoid till the last moment. The One Hour approach limits this pain, takes away the stress and gives you a worthwhile outcome.
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How to Kick Start Your Community’s Startup Scene

How to Kick Start Your Community’s Startup Scene | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it

I have never been more optimistic about the impact that the tech startup community is having on cities in America or about the role that cities outside of San Francisco / Silicon Valley can play in our future.

Cincinnati, like many startup communities in the US over the past 5 years, has revitalized important regions in its urban core, created accelerators, built co-working facilities, pooled together angel capital, attracted VCs, involved educational institutions and solicited the help of important corporations in a more cohesive ecosystem. I believe the next 20 years will be an excited time of regeneration for Cincinnati and many more progressive communities across the country.

Why Now?

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Use our free tools to help your small business - Sydney Morning Herald

Use our free tools to help your small business - Sydney Morning Herald | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
Check out what's on offer…
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4 Ridiculously Simple Steps to Grow Your Business That Almost Nobody Does Right

4 Ridiculously Simple Steps to Grow Your Business That Almost Nobody Does Right | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
Everybody has the answers to every problem these days … it’s crazy. Google any question you have, and you will likely find thousands of answers from so-called experts.
So how is this article any different? Well, it’s based on my more
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New organisation to target Scots entrepreneurial growth - Entrepreneurial Scotland

New organisation to target Scots entrepreneurial growth - Entrepreneurial Scotland | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it

The entity will be formally launched at the end of June, following close consultation with all participants in the two existing organisations.

Supporting the creation of ES, leading businessman Sir Tom Hunter said: "This move will enable an accelerated drive to build Scotland's entrepreneurial community in a strategic, well thought-out move that is for entrepreneurs, by entrepreneurs - an ethos that serves Scotland well."

 
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How to Get Employees to Share Ideas to Grow Your Business

How to Get Employees to Share Ideas to Grow Your Business | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
Your employees may be able to tell you a lot about your business you may not know. What do customers really think about your product or serv
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Grow up! Calling your company a 'startup' shouldn't be a security blanket - Tech City News

Grow up! Calling your company a 'startup' shouldn't be a security blanket - Tech City News | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it

After $336 million in VC funding, reaching a valuation of $1 billion and a staff of 700 employees, how did Jason Goldberg describe his troubled company Fab last month?

It’s a f*cking startup.

In a public memo, now deleted from his blog but preserved in angry amber by the snarkers at Valleywag, he sprinkled the f-word around more liberally than a Tarantino character and hammered out the message that despite it all, the company was still a startup.

Today, Fab is making more layoffs and will be down to 200 employees.

The black holeThere’s a point at which the word “startup” becomes a crutch.

That’s arguably what has happened with Fab. Starting out as a gay social network before metamorphosing into a flash deals site then into a more traditional style-orientated online retailer, the amount of money, time and people poured into what now looks like a black hole would be shocking to any sector besides the startup world.

 

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Here is what it actually takes to make it as an entrepreneur - Vivek Wadhwa

Here is what it actually takes to make it as an entrepreneur - Vivek Wadhwa | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it

A young male who was born to be an entrepreneur drops out from a computer-science program at a prestigious university. He meets a powerful venture capitalist who is so enamored with his idea that he gives him millions of dollars to build his technology. Then comes the multi-billion-dollar IPO.

That’s the Hollywood version of Silicon Valley. But it is as far from reality as is Disneyland. Entrepreneurship is never that easy and the stereotype of the startup founder is not representative of the technology world. Yes, there are a few, such as Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates, who made it big. But they are the outliers—and they too don’t fit the stereotype. Here are six myths about what it actually takes to make it:

1. Entrepreneurs are a product of nature.

A common belief is that entrepreneurs are born and cannot be made. Venture capitalist Fred Wilson once said that he was shocked when a professor told him you could teach people to be entrepreneurs. He explained, “I’ve been working with entrepreneurs for almost 25 years now and it is ingrained in my mind that someone is either born an entrepreneur or is not.” Venture capitalist Mark Suster, with whom I once had a fierce debate on this topic, maintained the same.

They’re wrong. My research team found that, of the 549 successful entrepreneurs that we surveyed in 2009, 52 percent were the first in their immediate families to start a business; about 39 percent had an entrepreneurial father and 7 percent had an entrepreneurial mother. (Some had both.) Only a quarter of the sample had caught the entrepreneurial bug when in college. Half didn’t even think about entrepreneurship then, and they had had little interest in it when in school.

This sample doesn’t necessarily prove my point. But look at some of most successful entrepreneurs that we know: Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Larry Page, Sergey Brin, and Jan Koum. They didn’t come from entrepreneurial families. Their parents were dentists, academics, lawyers, factory workers, or priests. I doubt they were writing business plans while in kindergarten or selling lemonade in grade school.

I know many ordinary entrepreneurs who also didn’t sell lemonade. I myself come from a family of government bureaucrats and teachers. I started my career as an I.T. professional and never dreamed of becoming an entrepreneur. But when I was 33, the opportunity presented itself to me to start a company that could impact the world. I made the leap and helped build a business that generated $120 million in annual revenue.

Silicon Valley luminary Steve Blank, who moderated my debate with Suster, adds another perspective. He says “Change the external culture and environment, and entrepreneurship can bloom regardless of its source—nature or nurture”. He’s right. Entrepreneurship flourishes in places where people can learn from and inspire one another, such as Silicon Valley and New York City.

2. The best entrepreneurs are young. If you’re over 35, you’re over the hill.

Silicon Valley investors openly tout their preference for younger entrepreneurs. One famous investor said, “People under 35 are the ones who make change happen … people over 45 basically die in terms of new ideas.”

My research teams documented that the average and median age of successful technology company founders when they started their companies had been 40. We learned that as many had been older than fifty as had been younger than twenty-five; twice as many had been over sixty as under twenty. Seventy percent were married when they launched their first business; an additional 5.2 percent were divorced, separated, or widowed. Sixty percent had had at least one child, and 43.5 percent had had two or more children. The Kauffman Foundation also researched the backgrounds of successful entrepreneurs and found similar results.

On a post on Quora, Jan Koum, the founder of WhatsApp—the most expensive technology acquisition ever—wrote “i incorporated WhatsApp on the day of my 33rd birthday. i had no idea i only had 2 years left.”

Look closer at the technology industry, and you will realize that VCs who say that older entrepreneurs are over the hill are misguided. For example, Marc Benioff was 35 when he founded Salesforce.com and Reid Hoffman was 36 when he founded LinkedIn. Reed Hastings was 37 when he founded Netflix; Mark Pincus was 41 when he started Zynga. Pradeep Sindhu was 42 when he founded Juniper Networks and Irwin Jacobs was 52 when he founded Qualcomm.

3. Dropping out is the way to go; education is merely a distraction.

PayPal billionaire Peter Thiel made headlines when he announced four years ago that he would pay students $100,000 to drop out of college. He wanted to prove that higher education is overpriced and unnecessary; that budding entrepreneurs are better off in building world-changing companies than in studying irrelevant courses in school.

His effort proved to be a dismal failure. Some Thiel startups received big media attention and adulation—such as one that announced it would be producing caffeine spray. But none were the successes that had been promised.

The Thiel Foundation quietly refocused its efforts on providing an alternative form of education to college dropouts, and several of its sponsored dropouts returned to school. That’s because there is no substitute for education. Yes, there are good alternatives to universities, but entrepreneurs need to learn the basics of business and management in order to succeed.

Indeed, my research team found that, on average, companies founded by college graduates have twice the sales and employment of companies founded by people who hadn’t gone to college. What matters is that the entrepreneur completes a baseline of education; the field of education and ranking of the college don’t play a significant role in entrepreneurial success. Founder education reduces business failure rates and increases profits, sales and employment.

4. Female entrepreneurs don’t have what it takes to cut it in the tech world.

Women-founded firms receive hardly any venture-capital investments; they are almost absent in high-level technology positions; they contribute to fewer than 5 percent of all I.T. patents and 1.2 percent of open-source software programs. This is despite the facts that girls now match boys in mathematical achievement; that 140 women enroll in higher education for every 100 men; and that women earn more than 50 percent of all bachelor’s and master’s degrees and nearly 50 percent of all doctorates in the United States.

Do female founders receive less VC backing because women are different? Not at all. Research by National Center for Women & Information Technology revealed that there are almost no differences in success factors between men and women company founders. Men and women are equally likely to have children at home when they start their businesses, though men are more likely to be married. Both sexes have exactly the same motivations; are of the same age when founding their startups; have similar levels of experience; and equally enjoy the startup culture.

It’s also not that women can’t cut it in the rough and tough business world. Women-led companies are more capital-efficient, and venture-backed companies run by a woman have 12 percent higher revenues, than others.

5. Entrepreneurship requires venture capital.

Many would-be entrepreneurs write business plans in the hope of finding a venture capitalist to invest in them, believing that, without this funding, they can’t start a company. And that view reflected reality a few years ago. Then, capital costs for technology were in the millions of dollars. But that is no longer the case.

A $500 laptop has more computing power today than Cray 2 supercomputers that cost $17.5 million in 1985. For storage, back then, you needed server farms and racks of hard disks, which cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and required air-conditioned data centers. Today, one can use cloud computing and cloud storage, costing practically nothing.

Sensors such as those in our smartphones cost tens of thousands of dollars a few years ago. Now they too cost a few dollars or cents. Entrepreneurs can build smartphone apps that act as medical assistants to detect disease; body sensors that monitor heart, brain, and body activity; and technologies to detect soil humidity and improve agriculture. And they can participate in the genomics revolution. It cost $100 million to sequence a full human genome a decade ago. It now costs $1,000. Genome data will soon be available on millions of people, and then billions—allowing entrepreneurs to research the causes of disease.

There are similar advances in robotics, artificial intelligence, 3D printing, and many other fields. These technologies too require no major capital outlays.

Venture capital follows innovation. If entrepreneurs build new technologies that customers need or love, money will come to them. They don’t need to wait for venture funding to start.

6. The tech world is for techies.

A common belief is that startup CEOs need to be engineers. Bill Gates argues that liberal-arts degrees don’t correlate well with job creation and that the humanities should be defunded in favor of science, engineering, technology, and mathematics. In Silicon Valley, there is a general bias against liberal arts and humanities. It is very hard for an artist or an English or psychology major to break in.

But note what Steve Jobs said when he unveiled the iPad 2: “It’s in Apple’s DNA that technology alone is not enough — it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the result that makes our heart sing, and nowhere is that more true than in these post-PC devices.” He taught the world that, though good engineering is important, what matters the most is good design. It takes artists, musicians, and psychologists working side by side with engineers to build products as elegant as the iPad. You can teach artists how to use software and graphics tools, but it’s much harder to turn engineers into artists.

My research at Duke and Harvard looked into the educational backgrounds of 652 U.S.-born chief executive officers and heads of product engineering at 502 technology companies in 2008. We found that only 37 percent held degrees in engineering or computer technology, and that just two percent held them in mathematics. The rest had degrees in fields as diverse as business, accounting, finance, health care, and arts and the humanities.

Critical thinking, communication, and scientific validation are skills that are in short supply in the tech world. And these are skills that are abundant in the humanities.

 

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HR Magazine - HR and the SME growth cycle

HR Magazine - HR and the SME growth cycle | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it

But while these small businesses are driving the economy, who are driving them? “SMEs typically have limited materials and financial resources – their people are their business,” says Jill Miller, research adviser at the CIPD and author of the report Achieving sustainable organisation though HR in SMEs. “Effective people management at all stages of organisational transition is fundamental to achieving sustainable organisation performance.” - See more at: http://www.hrmagazine.co.uk/hr/features/1142973/hr-sme-growth-cycle#sthash.GbGECAtv.OgNCIXXV.dpuf

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New Erasmus programme for early-stage entrepreneurs

New Erasmus programme for early-stage entrepreneurs | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
Initiative allows candidates learn the ropes from an experienced professional abroad
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5 non-digital tips for business growth - Real Business

5 non-digital tips for business growth - Real Business | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
Business news and management advice for entrepreneurs, growing businesses and SMEs.

SMEs  are constantly searching for the next technology solution but digital is not the only driver of business success..

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Six Ways to Finance your Small Business

Six Ways to Finance your Small Business | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
You’ve got a great business idea, you’re motivated, customers are waiting and the supply chain is in place. But you can’t make progress because the bank wants more collateral, or a revised business plan, or, maybe they won’t even talk with you. Take a look at these Six Ways to Finance your Small Business.

Via TechinBiz
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BSN's curator insight, May 16, 2014 4:20 PM

Six Ways to Finance your Small Business.

#business #startups #smallbiz

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Introducing the One Hour Business Plan

Introducing the One Hour Business Plan | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
Writing a business plan can be painful: I don’t know anybody who likes writing their business plan, it is a task most people avoid till the last moment. The One Hour approach limits this pain, takes away the stress and gives you a worthwhile outcome.
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‘There is a risk of losing entire generation of entrepreneurs’ - what nonesense from Daniel Calleja-Crespo

‘There is a risk of losing entire generation of entrepreneurs’ - what nonesense from Daniel Calleja-Crespo | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
Economic and employment growth across the EU cannot be sustained if governments do not put entrepreneurship and SMEs at the centre of economic strategy.
CELTAR Adviser's insight:

Yes, access to credit is the issue in Ireland. Aspiring entrepreneurs in Ireland have never been offered so much state support.

In fact there is a view that entrepreneurialism is being negatively affected because the government and Enterprise Ireland are offering too much support, and are creating a dependency culture.

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What To Do When A Cash Infusion Is Not Enough to Grow Your Business

Outside investors can provide expertise and connections to get you to the next level

 

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Watching your business grow is a beautiful thing. In the early stages, growth often occurs organically and at a manageable pace. Then the day arrives when you see new possibilities. After years of slow, steady growth, you believe there are real opportunities in the market to scale the business.

Scaling a company is a complex process. Business owners should give careful thought to what they can handle with their current resources and where they need outside expertise and assistance.

But it's not just financing. If you've taken your company as far as you can on your own and need industry know-how, business expertise and capital, a smart option may be to partner with a private equity firm Here are two ways to tap into outside investors outside of borrowing power:

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Are You A Small/Medium Enterprise? Grow Your Business in the UK with the Prince's Trust. - The Media Directory

The Prince’s Trust is looking for small enterprises in the technology or creative sectors who want to grow their business and can offer a sustainable...
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Visualistan: 8 SEO Basics To Grow Your Small Business #infographic

Visualistan: 8 SEO Basics To Grow Your Small Business #infographic | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
8 SEO tips to grow your small business in this infographic. It’s possible for any small business to increase traffic and qualified leads through search engines. By dedicating a small amount of time each day to SEO tasks, positive results can be seen for the long term.
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New $172million venture capital fund to set up in Ireland with support from Enterprise Ireland and NPRF – Minister Bruton « MerrionStreet.ie Irish Government News Service

New $172million venture capital fund to set up in Ireland with support from Enterprise Ireland and NPRF – Minister Bruton « MerrionStreet.ie Irish Government News Service | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it

€20 million investment in leading US international Life Sciences Venture
Capital Fund by Dept of Jobs through Enterprise Ireland

Investment will mean new funding for innovative companies to grow and
create jobs in Ireland

 

The Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Richard Bruton T.D. today announced that Lightstone Ventures is partnering with Enterprise Ireland and the NPRF to establish a $172million venture capital fund with offices in Ireland that will invest in innovative Irish companies.

 

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The growth of Aboriginal start-ups

The growth of Aboriginal start-ups | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it

There has been a surge in Aboriginal ownership of small businesses in Australia over the past decade or so, according to official figures.

Indigenous Business Australia (IBA), a government agency charged with helping Aborigines forge their own companies, says there were about 4,600 small firms run by Aboriginal people in 2001, compared with 13,000 in 2011.

Among new indigenous business owners are accountants, restaurateurs and gym franchise owners. Meanwhile, IBA says that other productive areas have included the construction, tourism, retail and mining services industries.

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Want to Avoid a Hiring Disaster? Use a Personality Test

Want to Avoid a Hiring Disaster? Use a Personality Test | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
Investing in the hiring process upfront is far more cost efficient than finding out someone is wrong for your company later on.
There is no mistake more costly, in terms of money, effort, and time, than a hiring mistake.

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Tweet from @HothouseProgram

Tweet from @HothouseProgram | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
RT @HothouseProgram: I caught up with @BillyLinehan at Startup Dublin last week. http://t.co/UdYRZu96dd
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SME growth barriers revealed - Real Business

SME growth barriers revealed - Real Business | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
New research has revealed that 36 per cent of people would like to start their own business because they want to earn money for themselves and not for their boss and a third would like to choose their own working hours.
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Your Product, Future and Employees: Three Customer Experience Pillars of Growth

Your Product, Future and Employees: Three Customer Experience Pillars of Growth | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it

Customer experience touch points are not created equal. Findings from a study of six B2B technology companies highlight the top customer experience touch points that drive different kinds of business growth. What helps businesses acquire new customers is not the same as what helps them keep customers or improve their share of wallet.


Businesses are looking to the field of customer experience management (CEM) to help them better understand how to improve customer loyalty and, consequently, business growth. The field of CEM can tell us a lot about how to grow companies. First, to have a growing business (e.g., improve profit, maximize lifetime value of customers), you need to have customers who engage in three different types of loyalty behaviors.

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Rubicon VC – The Irish Venture Capital Scene – league tables of most active Irish VCs – part of my European VC blog series

Rubicon VC – The Irish Venture Capital Scene – league tables of most active Irish VCs – part of my European VC blog series | Grow your Business Fast! | Scoop.it
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