Groups associated with places and features, including Aboriginal people
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Groups associated with places and features, including Aboriginal people
HSIE outcomes -

ENS2.5 Describes places in the local area and other parts of Australia and explains their significance

ENS2.6 Describes people's interactions with environments and identiites responsible ways of interacting with environments

Subject matter - Groups associated with places and features, including Aboriginal people
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Teaching activities | Global Education

Teaching activities | Global Education | Groups associated with places and features, including Aboriginal people | Scoop.it

 

 

Women in Rajasthan, India, in saris spend time searching for, collecting and carrying firewood before they can cook food. Photo © Robert Harding/Robert Harding World Imagery/Corbis

 

 

 

 

 

A local keeper checking a big-headed turtle, platysternon megacephalum Photo © Cuc Phuong National Park Turtle Conservation Centre

Souha Malak's insight:

             

Globalisation surrounds an understanding of “complex social, economic and political links between people and the impact that changes have on others” (Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. 2011, p.368). Global Education is a reliable and enlightening website that provides teaching resources across the entire curriculum based on a global perspective. This resource is most advantageous encouraging students to develop a deeper, richer understanding of the world around us and to build on existing knowledge to allow students to visualise the future of the world.  Global education emphasises the unity and interdependence of human society, developing a sense of self and appreciation of cultural diversity, encouraging students to develop a richer understanding in shaping a better, shared future for the world. Within this reliable website is a resource gallery providing rich, engaging resources such as ‘People and the Environment’.

 

This resource is suitable for stage two students, focusing on how people use and affect the environment and assisting students to develop key understandings about our dependence on the environment, including the use of natural resources for energy, and why it is important to protect and preserve the variety of life on earth.

 

Marsh (2008) indicates that resources, which explore a global perspective “enable students to travel vicariously to other times and places, they add important dimensions to student learning and, in the process, provide further opportunities for students to develop listening, speaking, writing, and reading skills”(p.34). This website is useful when exploring HSIE outcome ENS2.6 (Describes people’s interactions with environments and identities responsible ways of interacting with environments) as it includes a section called ‘People and the Environment’. In this specific section, students explore various case studies including case studies like ‘people conserving turtles in Asia’. By students viewing the site and the pictures of people protecting environments and making positive changes, it allows students to build a deeper understanding of about their dependence to the environment. Students can discover why it is important to protect and to take care of their environment in a positive way.

 

An idea for a possible formal assessment task  for all stage two students could be by using the internet and the Global Education website student’s research various global environmental issues like ‘Conserving Asian turtles’. Students are to write an investigation including the following: a description of turtles and origin, list five ways to addressing the issue, and ways to hope for the future in looking at a better solution for the environment. If this is achievable then each student can discuss with the whole class and exchange ideas and information from other peers discussing their research and findings.

 

A possible teaching idea for stage two students could be by reading the book called ‘window’ by Jeanie Baker and discuss with students the changes that have been made to natural environments around us. Students list the changes people have made to the natural environment shown on each page. Individually, find examples of these types of changes in your own environment. If this is achievable, in pairs students discuss:

Why do people make changes to their environment?

What impact do the changes have on the people and the environment ?

 

A follow up for this teaching idea could be inviting a member of the local community who has been living in the area for thirty to fifty years (or as long as possible) to speak about the changes they have seen in the local environment over that period. Finally, students can
create and label two pictures (use one sheet of paper divided into two) to show their environment now and what it might look like in the future.This will be a hands on activity which is superior for a child as "interactive and experiential learning can assist students to develop their independence, higher order thinking, and problem solving skills" (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 145).

 

Furthermore, this lesson and assessment idea effectively links HSIE outcomes to other key learning areas such as English by meeting the English reading outcome RS2.6 and writing outcome WS2.10 (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, p.19).

 

References:                                                                                                             

Commonwealth of Australia, (2011). Global Education – Teacher resources to encourage a global perspective across the curriculum, People and the Environment. Australian Government. Retrieved April 17, 2013 from http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/people-and-the-environment-lp.html

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.

 

Marsh, (2008). Studies of society and environment : exploring teaching possibilities. French Forest, N.S.W. : Pearson Education Australia. 5th edition. Chapter 2 : Planning for learning. Retrieved on March 20, 2013 from Sydney University Library website http://ereserve.library.usyd.edu.au.ezproxy1.library.usyd.edu.au/fisher/MarshStudies2008Ch2.pdf

 

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ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map

ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map | Groups associated with places and features, including Aboriginal people | Scoop.it

Our Place - Australia

Souha Malak's insight:

 

The ‘Indigenous language map’ is an excellent resource for teachers to use in their stage 2 classroom. This resource is an interactive map displaying the various language groups of the Aboriginal people Australia wide. The map demonstrates the high number of Indigenous languages that were used by Aboriginal communities. Using the interactive element of the map allows educators to focus on the languages used in their local area. 

 

Even though it's interactive, this is quite a simple resource which would allow for flexible integration into lesson plans. In addition with this map, it would be helpful to invite a local Aboriginal Elder to come in and speak about the Indigenous languages of the local area and the importance of language in Aboriginal culture. After reviewing the map and hearing the Elder speak, students would be provided with a simple map of Australia and asked to mark their local community area and identify the language spoken by the people of this area.  Once this task is completed, students could be divided into language groups to help highlight the importance of language and its ties to community in Aboriginal culture.

 

Using the Aboriginal Language map, students would be provided with information to use a primary atlas or mapping web site to look at different maps of Australia and what they represent e.g. settlement, landform and Aboriginal language groups. Then students are construct a table with the headings similarities and differences, in pairs students discuss and write down the similarities and differences between both maps and finally share with the whole classroom. In addition, using the Aboriginal language map, allow students to locate each state and territory, capitals, major rivers and mountains, and the location of significant features and places of interest for each state e,g. Uluru, Great Barrier Reef, Great Australian Bight, Gulf of Carpentaria. Students record their findings in a retrieval chart and also identify the Aboriginal Language group of the local area.

 

This activity would help to highlight the diversity of the Aboriginal people and also highlight the importance of community to these people. It directly ties in with HSIE outcome CUS 2.3 & 2.4 and ENS 2.5 (Board of Studies, 2006) and could be integrated with outcomes from the Mathematics syllabus by including skills such as mapping. 

 

Reference List:

 

Board of Studies. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. NSW: Board of Studies

 

Horton, D, (1996). ABC Indigenous Language Map. Aboriginal Studies Press, AIATSIS. Retrieved March 23, 2013 from http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/

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National parks - australia.gov.au

National parks - australia.gov.au | Groups associated with places and features, including Aboriginal people | Scoop.it

Bungle Bungle Range, Purnululu National Park, WA. Image courtesy of the National Library of Australia.

Souha Malak's insight:

 

National Parks:

 

The website “National Parks” (Australian Government) is a useful resource for both teachers and students but also for teachers to use when teaching stage 2 students the subject matter ‘Groups associated with places, features including Aboriginal people’ derived from the strand ‘Environments’. The website relates to the subject matter that focuses on various places and features within Australia like National parks and Aboriginal sacred sites for example: Uluru, and The Three Sisters. The website, states that Australia has over 500 national parks and over 28 million hectares of land is designated as national parkland, accounting for almost four per cent of Australia's land areas. In addition, a further six per cent of Australia is protected and includes state forests, nature parks and conservation reserves. These are places or areas that the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, has agreed are worthy of special protection because they represent the best examples of the world's cultural and natural heritage. Some of these, such as Kakadu, Uluru-Kata Tjuta, and Purnululu National Parks, are jointly managed by the Aboriginal traditional owners as UNESCO World Heritage areas.

 

The resource allows teachers to grasp and comprehend environments that include different types of features that relate to various communities including Aboriginal people. The resource focuses on case studies of State and National parks in NSW and Australia. The topic ‘States and National parks’ (derived from the board of studies unit of work) is essential for teachers to grasp relevant information in order to teach the concept to students. The topic provides opportunities for students to explore issues, values, and attitudes associated with the establishment of State and national parks.

 

Students can research various national parks such as ‘Purnululu National Park’ in Western Australia. Prior to teaching students about ‘groups associated with places, features, including Aboriginal people’, it is essential for students to research about the history of Aboriginal lifestyle, lands and national parks that has been used by Aboriginal people for thousands of years. Through this, students research and explore sacred lands of Aboriginal people like the Dharug people, and find National parks across New South Wales and Australia where they are able to investigate and describe the national parks and their significance. As a result, students are able to describe the Aboriginal people’s interactions with environments and identities and compare them with other local areas in Australia.  

 

A teaching idea for students may include as a class students can view images of National and State parks, where students can discuss their experiences of parks. To stimulate the students’ thinking, teachers can ask student’s questions:

 

-          Have you ever been to a park? Including National Parks

 

-          What type of things can we do at a park?

 

-          Why do we have national parks in Australia?

 

Through this teaching idea, students can collect information to place under the two headings: ‘what we know about parks’ and ‘what we would like to know about parks’. Teachers provide maps of NSW and Australia that show the location of National and State parks and encourage students to use the internet, libraries, environmental organisations, Aboriginal organisations (land councils). Support students by encouraging them to write letters and send emails to the organisation asking to find relevant information to place under the two headings. Information may include the number of parks, reserves, and refuges that have been set aside in Australia; their location; their purposes; the names of State and national parks.

 

An idea for an assessment task may include organising an excursion to visit any National Park in Australia, students observe and record information according to history, flora and fauna, local areas, and heritage of land. Students are to take photos and discuss in class their findings and write an individual factual report from their perspective from what they discovered and found interesting.

 

A literacy and numeracy strategy may include teachers can incorporate activities where students are to create a table and compare and contrast their environment organsition with other environmental organisations and features they research. Students write down factual points like location, purpose, local areas, national parks, historical sites. Students, discuss their results with their peers through sharing and exchanging ideas. Finally, share with the whole classroom. This activity allows students to analyse what they have learnt and understood about environments and groups, places and features including Aboriginal People’s lifestyle and connection with their land.

 

 

Consulting, M, et al. (2011). National Parks. Australian Government. Retrieved March 27, 2013 from http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/national-parks 

 

 

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s2_environ.pdf

Souha Malak's insight:

 

This curriculum support document is collaborated by the NSW Government Education and Training and provides teachers with meaningful, engaging lesson ideas to plan and implement for stage 2 students. Marsh (2008) states that this document “provides detailed guidelines on outcomes, learning experiences and forms of assessment” (p.25) which is foundation to quality learning. This resource is seen as a rich, engaging piece of work for both teachers and students as it provides teachers with a range of information and resources.  Teachers can make use of this resource when learning about the subject matter: groups of places, features including Aboriginal people – students gain an insight of people’s interactions with environments, and places and local areas in parts of Australia.

One of the most capturing aspects of this document is its use of text ‘Rak Niwilli’.

 

The Rak Niwilli text is effective in helping young student’s to explore the Aboriginal culture with deeper meaning referring to Australia’s diversity. In addition, the text also incorporates Aboriginal culture and environments including features and sensory ideas of what would the environment smell like. Marsh (2008) emphasises that this form of text is beneficial as it provides a “smooth transition from what students know and what they have already studied” (Marsh, 20088, p.35). Moreover, the curriculum support document provides teachers with foundation knowledge to help support students to critically reflect on people’s interactions with environments and identities responsible for ways of interacting with environments.

 

An idea for a possible teaching lesson could be reading to the students the book called ‘My place’ by Nadia Wheatley. Allow students to familiarise with the text and its meaning, by using the visuals in the text along with their imagination. As a group, each student identifies visual elements that are used to show change over time e.g. balance and use of colour between the natural and built environment. Allocate students to use graphic organisers to identify and describe environmental changes that they see within the text and compare with the environmental changes in their local area. In pairs, students can discuss and exchange ideas to why the Author has used these changes and then students can relate to their environmental changes. A follow up to this teaching idea, is to invite an elderly from the local area to explain the changes they experienced in their environment from the past to present.

 

An idea for a possible formal assessment task could be providing all stage 2 students with a list of environmental issues, students have to select one and research about that issue from their local area or other local areas in parts of Australia. Students are to conduct a speech on their research and finding, along with a possible resolution strategy for their chosen environmental issue.

 

Furthermore, this lesson and assessment idea effectively links HSIE outcomes to other key learning areas such as English by meeting the English reading outcome RS2.6 and writing outcome WS2.10 (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, p.19).

 

Board of Studies NSW (2007). K-6 English Syllabus. Retrieved on March 26, 2013 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/english/k6_english_syl.pdf

 

Marsh, (2008). Studies of society and environment : exploring teaching possibilities. French Forest, N.S.W. : Pearson Education Australia. 5th edition. Chapter 2 : Planning for learning. Retrieved on March 20, 2013 from Sydney University Library website

http://ereserve.library.usyd.edu.au.ezproxy1.library.usyd.edu.au/fisher/MarshStudies2008Ch2.pdf

 

NSW Government Education Communities, (1999-2011). Curriculum Support, Significant Environments. New South Wales through the Department of Education and Communities. Retrieved March 30, 2013 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/hsie/teaching/stage2/S2%20assests/s2_environ.pdf

 

 

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Aboriginal scarred trees - Creative Spirits

Aboriginal scarred trees - Creative Spirits | Groups associated with places and features, including Aboriginal people | Scoop.it
Carved trees have been scarred by Aboriginal people for various purposes, from cutting out bark for a canoe to spiritual purposes.

Very few carved trees remain today. They are said to be a history book and represent Aboriginal people’s soul.
Souha Malak's insight:

          

"Aboriginal scarred trees"

 

The website “creative spirits” – Aboriginal sacred trees, is a great resource for both teachers and students in learning about the Aboriginal land and caring for the environment. The website focuses on how carved trees have been scarred by Aboriginal people for various purposes, from cutting out bark for a canoe to spiritual purposes. This website reflects on sacred trees in parts of Australia and their significance to Aboriginal people. This website reflects on how Aboriginal people and non-Aboriginal people interact with environments. This website shows there is a sacred tree that grows in a public park at Parramatta and it has known to be a scarred tree by the Aboriginal people for whom “more than 7,500 Aboriginal-scarred trees have been recorded in NSW, but fewer than 100 carved trees remain standing in their original location. The rest has been removed for farming, forestry or development” (K, Jens. 2000, p.1).

 

The resource enables students to explore Aboriginal sacred sites and to explore other sites, features and environments like Lake Boort reserve and The Keelbundoora Scarred Tree and Heritage Trail. The website contains, information that teachers and students can use to create learning in multiple ways. The information includes, the types of trees used and cut by Aboriginal people, why Aboriginal people use the sacred trees for, where can you find the sacred trees, and it's significance to our environments and Aboriginal people. It is an essential website for students as it contains visual diagrams of the characteristics of a sacred tree, to guide students into locating where the sacred trees might be located depending on what they look like and how they might them.

 

The beneficial part of this website is that it provides students with a link to newspaper articles, YouTube clips based on refining and making wooden spoon dish that used for digging and carrying. This allows students to understand the importance of how Aboriginal people interact with their sacred items (carved bark, trees, and stones) placed in National parks and other environments that Aboriginal people use. Also this website is useful for students as it contains a poem “Gum tree” that students can practice reading and make meaning with the poem. This helps students to remember that a tree is much more than just a tree.  

 

A teaching idea may include showing a video and pictures of the public park at Parramatta that has the sacred trees. Explain to students that very few carved trees remain today. They are said to be a history book and represent Aboriginal people’s soul. Discuss Aboriginal’s people’s special relationship with the land i.e. emotional, spiritual, and cultural connections to the land. Ask students: would you hear, smell and feel the same things in the environment in 10 years time? Why or why not? Relate to the students’ sensory investigation of their environment. Students share and exchange their ideas forming a classroom discussion along with an individual written report. Moreover, this lesson idea effectively links HSIE to other key learning areas such as English outcome WS2.9 (Board of studies NSW, 2007, p.19).

 

 

Board of Studies NSW (2007). K-6 English Syllabus. Retrieved on March 20, 2013 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/english/k6_english_syl.pdf

 

K, Jens, (2000). Creative Spirits: Aboriginal Scarred Trees. Retrieved March 22, 2013 from http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/land/aboriginal-scarred-trees

 

 

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