The Connection Between People and Place in Australia ENS2.6
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History of Bondi Beach

History of Bondi Beach | The Connection Between People and Place in Australia ENS2.6 | Scoop.it
The history of Bondi Beach
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This website is to be used as a guide for the teacher in assisting children with the assessment task as mentioned in the Bondi Rescue video description. Once children have viewed the clip they will be put into groups of three or four, these groups will have to take on the roles of reporters and lifeguards. The reporters will be investigating why Bondi Beach is an important feature of Australia, the students playing life guards will have to present a life guard’s perspective on why Bondi Beach is significant as well as describing why they are associated with the beach. This website can be a starting point for students research, they should be given class time to read through the relevant information and with the teacher’s assistance find other sources of appropriate information. The students should them compile their research and come up with some reporter questions and life guard responses to present to the class. This assessment is in adherence with the first principle of the Universal Design for Learning because it allows students to access information through a variety of different modalities such as visual learning through videos and written text, this means that the information that must be understood in order to complete the assessment task is able to be perceived by all students (Rose & Gravel, 2014, para. 2). This task also allows students to gain deep understanding of the topic as they practice “information processing skills” such as integrating new information with prior knowledge (Rose & Gravel, 2013, para. 4). Students are able to work collaboratively and are provided with multiple means of expression when it comes to their understanding, they are able to write down scripts, act out information, create power points and anything they think will assist with their learning. This is also in accordance with the Universal Design for Learning’s second principle which explains that learners “navigate a learning environment and express what they know” differently and individually, so by allowing students to present their understanding in so many different ways each students needs should be met (Rose & Gravel, 2013, para. 1).

 

Rose, D. H., & Gravel, J. (2014). UDL guidelines 2.0. Retrieved April 11, 2014 from http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/udlguidelines/principle1

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brochure_1.pdf

Elizabeth Duffy's insight:

This brochure is to be used in conjunction with the I Live Here – Cabramatta video. The teacher should explain that this is an activity to help students gain better understanding about why Cabramatta is associated with Vietnamese Australians and why it is an important place for this group of people. This will allow students to understand that the brochure activity is part of a “sequence of activities and that they need to collect and analyse data from a range of sources and persepctives” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 49). As an introduction to the idea of Vietnamese Australians being associated with Cabramatta this brochure can be handed out to students in pairs, they will be asked to make a mind map with “Cabramatta” in the middle, the teacher should then ask students to make four main categories of the mind map including “food”, “shops”, “religion” and “activities”. Students should then make arrows off these titles writing down anything they read that fits into the categories. This activity allows students to work collaboratively to sort through information and present it visually. Once this has been done children should reflect on what they have written, the teacher can ask questions such as “why do we think these categories are important to Vietnamese Australians?” and “how is it different to what you are used to?”. In asking these questions the teacher “acts as an activator” (Arnold, 2011, p. 220, as cited in, Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 58), challenging and directing students thoughts on the subject. Once this activity is finished the teacher should show the video I Live Here – Cabramatta and ask the students to reflect on their mind maps by writing why these things are important to Vietnamese Australians in Cabramatta and how Cabramatta grew to become a place associated with this particular group ENS2.6 (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 55).

 

Board of Studies. (2006). HSIE syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Planning for teaching through critical inquiry. In, Teaching society and environment, pp. 2-21. South Melbourne: Cengage.

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Twelve Canoes

The Twelve Canoes website offers an Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander perspective from the Yolngu people of Ramingining which is in the central part of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory. Students can be shown The Swamp video to gain an understanding of the connection the Yolngu people have with The Swamp in Ramingining and why they are so strongly associated with that place ENS2.6 (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 55). Teachers may assist students with the comprehension of this video by having a discussion afterward and using one of the Six Super Strategies for comprehension, questioning (Focus on Reading, as cited in, DET, 2010, p. 5). This technique is used to help students gain understanding from a text, the teacher can ask questions such as “what in the text helped you know that?”, “whose point of view is this?” “when you viewed the text what did it remind you of?” (Focus on Reading, as cited in, DET, 2010, p. 5). While viewing the text students may also write down ‘wonderings’, questions that they may have about the text, after the discussion students can tick next to the wondering if they know the answer now or watch the clip again and find out the answer (Focus on Reading, as cited in, DET, 2010, p. 5). This website and video clip is a good reference for teaching Indigenous perspectives because it meets selection criteria for resources. Twelve Canoes presents authentic material that is up to date, relevant to the text and specific, it is also balanced demonstrating the diversity of indigenous societies, the authors of the site are Indigenous Australians and is accepted by the local community of Ramingining as appropriate which are all selection criteria listed in the Aboriginal education K-12 resource guide (NSW DET, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate, 2003, p. 16).

 

Board of Studies. (2006). HSIE syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2010). Teaching comprehension strategies. Sydney: NSW Department of Education and Training.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate. (2003). Aboriginal education K-12: resource guide. Sydney: Department of Education and Training. 

12 Canoes is a broadband website presenting, in an artistic, cultural and educational context, the stories, art and environment of the Yolngu people who live around the Arafura swamp in north-eastern Arnhem Land.

Elizabeth Duffy's insight:

The Twelve Canoes website offers an Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander perspective from the Yolngu people of Ramingining which is in the central part of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory. Students can be shown The Swamp video to gain an understanding of the connection the Yolngu people have with The Swamp in Ramingining and why they are so strongly associated with that place ENS2.6 (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 55). Teachers may assist students with the comprehension of this video by having a discussion afterward and using one of the Six Super Strategies for comprehension, questioning (Focus on Reading, as cited in, DET, 2010, p. 5). This technique is used to help students gain understanding from a text, the teacher can ask questions such as “what in the text helped you know that?”, “whose point of view is this?” “when you viewed the text what did it remind you of?” (Focus on Reading, as cited in, DET, 2010, p. 5). While viewing the text students may also write down ‘wonderings’, questions that they may have about the text, after the discussion students can tick next to the wondering if they know the answer now or watch the clip again and find out the answer (Focus on Reading, as cited in, DET, 2010, p. 5). This website and video clip is a good reference for teaching Indigenous perspectives because it meets selection criteria for resources. Twelve Canoes presents authentic material that is up to date, relevant to the text and specific, it is also balanced demonstrating the diversity of indigenous societies, the authors of the site are Indigenous Australians and is accepted by the local community of Ramingining as appropriate which are all selection criteria listed in the Aboriginal education K-12 resource guide (NSW DET, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate, 2003, p. 16).

 

Board of Studies. (2006). HSIE syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2010). Teaching comprehension strategies. Sydney: NSW Department of Education and Training.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate. (2003). Aboriginal education K-12: resource guide. Sydney: Department of Education and Training. 

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Dealing with the Good, Bad, Happy and Sad | Bondi Rescue S8 E5 - YouTube

SUBSCRIBE - http://bit.ly/subscribebondirescue FACEBOOK - https://www.facebook.com/BondiRescueTV Season 9 - http://bit.ly/BondiRescueS9 Season 8 - http://bit...
Elizabeth Duffy's insight:

This video can be used as an introduction to an assessment for students where they give their opinion on how and why they value features in their community ENS2.5 as well as investigate and evaluate why particular natural and built features in Australia are significant, considering different points of view ENS2.6 (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 58). This video clip can be used to introduce Bondi Lifeguards as a group associated with Bondi Beach. The television series Bondi Rescue is a popular show that some students may have already seen, teachers should show the clip and then ask students to tell them the different things the life guards had to do in the clip. Once this has been done teachers should ask probing questions such as “what do you think would happen if there were no life guards at Bondi?” and “why do you think life guards are so important at Bondi Beach?”. This short activity allows children to reflect upon their existing knowledge and construct new meaning surrounding the topic of lifeguards and their association with Bondi. This process is a key tenant of constructivism (Piaget, 1963, as cited in, Bobis, Mulligan & Lowrie, 2013, p. 8) and works in existence with another important pedagogical element, making information and activities relevant to students by basing it on their interests (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 61). It is understood that in doing this, teachers promote “intellectual engagement” with the subject matter and provide a good base for students to build their knowledge (Gilbert & Hopper, 2014, p. 61). Once this clip has been shown children should be put into groups of three or four to complete the rest of the task which will be continued with the History of Bondi Beach page.

Board of Studies. (2006). HSIE syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Bobis, J., Mulligan, J., & Lowrie, T. (2013). Teaching mathematics for understanding: insights from research and practice. In, Mathematics for children: challenging children to think mathematically (4th ed.). Sydney: Pearson Education.

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Planning for teaching through critical inquiry. In, Teaching society and environment, pp. 2-21. South Melbourne: Cengage.

 

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I Live Here - Cabramatta Australia - YouTube

A stirring and moving 5 minute video narrative about Australian identity and Vietnamese Ancestral Heritage - narrated by a Vietnamese Australian affirming he...
Elizabeth Duffy's insight:

I Live Here – Cabramatta is a short video that explores the identity of a Vietnamese Australian women and her connection to the suburb of Cabramatta, the short film is from her perspective. The film touches on how there are many different types of Australians who make up the diverse nation of Australia and goes on to list the similarities and differences between an area that is predominantly Anglo-Saxon and between the Vietnamese Australian community of Cabramatta. This is a great tool to use in classrooms to gain a global perspective on the association of groups with a particular place or feature ENS2.6 (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 55) in Australia because it allows students to hear about similarities and differences of beliefs and culture of people in Australia from a Vietnamese-Australian perspective which may be different to what some students are usually exposed to (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008, p. 14). It also touches on other areas in the Global Perspectives framework (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008) including distinguishing acts of racism (p. 14) as well as helping students to recognise how the past, present and future affect people, cultures and environment (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008, p. 15). The short film allows students to see how events in history such as war can cause people to move to new areas such as Cabramatta. It demonstrates to students how culture moves with people and the short film represents a place, Cabramatta that is associated with the Vietnamese Australian community who have come together in this area to celebrate and continue their culture through the introduction of various elements such as food, architecture and religion.

 

Board of Studies. (2006). HSIE syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Commonwealth of Australia. (2008). Global Perspectives: a framework for global education in Australian schools. Victoria AUS: Education Services Australia.

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