Collective intelligence
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Collective intelligence
Collective intelligence is a shared or group intelligence that emerges from the collaboration and competition of many individuals and appears in consensus decision making in bacteria, animals, humans and computer networks.
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The nature of collective intelligence

The nature of collective intelligence | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it

Presentation by Pierre Levy

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45 minute video presentation supported by slides on the nature of collective intelligence and the philosophical and technical construct behind the next level of the internet as a global mind.

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Luciano Lampi's curator insight, March 22, 2013 2:15 PM

Pierre Levy, c´est toujours très intéressant!

Bernard Ryefield's curator insight, June 18, 2013 2:32 PM

Pierre Lévy invented IEML; think semantic web

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Four principles – 2: There are no rights | Tom Graves / Tetradian

Four principles – 2: There are no rights | Tom Graves / Tetradian | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it
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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, February 9, 2013 11:36 AM

In essence, Principle #2 asserts that every purported ‘right’ can and should be reframed in terms of interlocking mutual responsibilities. Shifting the emphasis from ‘rights’ to responsibilities makes the desired-outcome of each ‘right’ much more achievable in real-world practice:

> a focus on the interlocking and interdependence of responsibilities identifies how the desired-outcome can be achieved

> a focus on the mutuality of responsibilities provides active protection against paediarchy and other ‘rights’-based dysfunctions

>any asymmetries in responsibilities can be highlighted, and where necessary can then also be described in defensible yet challengeable form – for example, the lesser ‘response-abilities’ of children relative to adults

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A New Way to Network Inside Your Company

A New Way to Network Inside Your Company | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it

Pharmaceuticals manufacturer Boehringer Ingelheim offers a creative way to break down silos in the organization.

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Brilliant! Anyone up for lunch?

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Innovation Excellence | Crowdsourcing and Co-Creation are Complementary

Innovation Excellence | Crowdsourcing and Co-Creation are Complementary | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it
The Innovation Excellence community is home to innovation articles, webinars, videos, training and education - powering successful growth in the innovation management profession.
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What differentiates crowdsourcing from co-creation? These two buzzwords are used a variety of contexts today, which leads to a general confusion about the difference between these terms which are, let’s admit it, conceptually close. Even Quora’s answers are more confusing than enlightning!Joyce Van Dijk brings a valuable contribution to the discussion, and in this post we will complement it by findings from an academic paper, Crowdsourcing of Inventive Activities : Definition and Limits (Penin & Burger-Helmchen, 2011). This blog post builds on this research to highlight the advantages and limits of crowdsourcing… and the complementary role of co-creation.

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Jacinto Lajas's curator insight, January 8, 2013 1:08 PM

What differentiates crowdsourcing from co-creation? These two buzzwords are used a variety of contexts today, which leads to a general confusion about the difference between these terms which are, let’s admit it, conceptually close. Even Quora’s answers are more confusing than enlightning!Joyce Van Dijk brings a valuable contribution to the discussion, and in this post we will complement it by findings from an academic paper, Crowdsourcing of Inventive Activities : Definition and Limits (Penin & Burger-Helmchen, 2011). This blog post builds on this research to highlight the advantages and limits of crowdsourcing… and the complementary role of co-creation.

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Capitalising on the Crowd - Collective Intelligence

Capitalising on the Crowd - Collective Intelligence | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it
Social technologies are increasing the ability of companies to tap into the distributed knowledge and expertise of individuals located inside and outside the formal boundaries of the enterprise. Ap...
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Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Creating More Intelligent Organizations

Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Creating More Intelligent Organizations | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it
I recently read a fascinating online conversation on Collective Intelligence with Tom Malone. Malone is Professor of Management at MIT’s Sloan School and the founding director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence (CCI).
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Another summary of the MIT Centre for Collective Intelligence and its research.

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The emerging science of 'collective intelligence' — and the rise of the global brain

The emerging science of 'collective intelligence' — and the rise of the global brain | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it

Over at the Edge there's a fascinating article by Thomas W. Malone about the work he and others are doing to understand the rise of collective human intelligence — an emergent phenomenon that's being primarily driven by our information technologies. We may be on an evolutionary trajectory, he argues, that could someday give rise to the global brain. And amazingly, he's developing an entirely new scientific discipline to back his case.

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Innovation Excellence | Explosion! Crowdsourcing for Marketing and Innovation

Innovation Excellence | Explosion! Crowdsourcing for Marketing and Innovation | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it

In an interactive timeline, called Crowdsourcing by World’s Best Global Brands, we show how the use of crowdsourcing has exploded since the early 2000′s. The objective of this timeline was to have a rich and visual representation of how brands increasingly use of crowdsourcing to pursue marketing- and innovation-related business objectives.

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Geoff Mulgan "Openness and collective intelligence, its prospects and its challenges"

In his speech, Geoff Mulgan talks about collective intelligence and how we think about the idea of openness. Through several examples, he introduces a reflec...
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Why Expertise Matters in Collective Knowledge and Intelligence « Getting Results from Crowdsourcing

Why Expertise Matters in Collective Knowledge and Intelligence « Getting Results from Crowdsourcing | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it

One of the more interesting areas of crowdsourcing today is in the area of collective knowledge and intelligence – often referred to as Q&A.

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Dwayne Spradlin (CEO, InnoCentive): The Power of Open Innovation

Dwayne Spradlin, CEO of InnoCentive, discusses the power of crowdsourcing innovation at the BRITE '10 conference. He shows how InnoCentive's global network o...
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Die Kunst des idealen Vernetzens

Die Kunst des idealen Vernetzens | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it
Sie wollten schon immer wissen, wie man sich das perfekte Netzwerk aufbaut? Diese 12 Regeln sollten Sie befolgen. Beruflich werden Sie kreativer, privat glücklicher.
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'Networked minds' require fundamentally new kind of economics

'Networked minds' require fundamentally new kind of economics | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it
In their computer simulations of human evolution, scientists have discovered the emergence of the “homo socialis” with “other-regarding” preferences.
Viktor Markowski's insight:

Economics has a beautiful body of theory. But does it describe real markets? Doubts have come up not only in the wake of the financial crisis, since financial crashes should not occur according to the then established theories. Since ages, economic theory is based on concepts such as efficient markets and the “homo economicus”, i.e. the assumption of competitively optimizing individuals and firms. It was believed that any behavior deviating from this would create disadvantages and, hence, be eliminated by natural selection. But experimental evidence from behavioral economics show that, on average, people behave more fairness-oriented and other-regarding than expected. A new theory by scientists from ETH Zurich now explains why. 

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luiy's curator insight, March 25, 2013 5:33 PM

Evolution of “friendliness”


Prof. Dirk Helbing of ETH Zurich, who coordinated the study, adds: “Compared to conventional models for the evolution of social cooperation, we have distinguished between the actual behavior – cooperation or not – and an inherited character trait, describing the degree of other-regarding preferences, which we call the friendliness.” The actual behavior considers not only the own advantage (“payoff”), but also gives a weight to the payoff of the interaction partners depending on the individual friendliness. For the “homo economicus”, the weight is zero. The friendliness spreads from one generation to the next according to natural selection. This is merely based on the own payoff, but mutations happen.

For most parameter combinations, the model predicts the evolution of a payoff-maximizing “homo economicus” with selfish preferences, as assumed by a great share of the economic literature. Very surprisingly, however, biological selection may create a “homo socialis” with other-regarding preferences, namely if offsprings tend to stay close to their parents. In such a case, clusters of friendly people, who are “conditionally cooperative”, may evolve over time.

If an unconditionally cooperative individual is born by chance, it may be exploited by everyone and not leave any offspring. However, if born in a favorable, conditionally cooperative environment, it may trigger cascade-like transitions to cooperative behavior, such that other-regarding behavior pays off. Consequently, a “homo socialis” spreads.

 

 

Networked minds create a cooperative human species


“This has fundamental implications for the way, economic theories should look like,” underlines Professor Helbing. Most of today’s economic knowledge is for the “homo economicus”, but people wonder whether that theory really applies. A comparable body of work for the “homo socialis” still needs to be written.

While the “homo economicus” optimizes its utility independently, the “homo socialis” puts himself or herself into the shoes of others to consider their interests as well,” explains Grund, and Helbing adds: “This establishes something like “networked minds”. Everyone’s decisions depend on the preferences of others.” This becomes even more important in our networked world.

 

 

A participatory kind of economy


How will this change our economy? Today, many customers doubt that they get the best service by people who are driven by their own profits and bonuses. “Our theory predicts that the level of other-regarding preferences is distributed broadly, from selfish to altruistic. Academic education in economics has largely promoted the selfish type. Perhaps, our economic thinking needs to fundamentally change, and our economy should be run by different kinds of people,” suggests Grund. “The true capitalist has other-regarding preferences,” adds Helbing, “as the “homo socialis” earns much more payoff.” This is, because the “homo socialis” manages to overcome the downwards spiral that tends to drive the “homo economicus” towards tragedies of the commons. The breakdown of trust and cooperation in the financial markets back in 2008 might be seen as good example.

“Social media will promote a new kind of participatory economy, in which competition goes hand in hand with cooperation,” believes Helbing. Indeed, the digital economy’s paradigm of the “prosumer” states that the Internet, social platforms, 3D printers and other developments will enable the co-producing consumer. “It will be hard to tell who is consumer and who is producer”, says Christian Waloszek. “You might be both at the same time, and this creates a much more cooperative perspective.”

Onearth's curator insight, March 26, 2013 4:58 AM

After homo sapiens sapiens it's time for homo sapiens socialis

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More on reframing entropy in business | Tom Graves / Tetradian

More on reframing entropy in business | Tom Graves / Tetradian | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it
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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, February 14, 2013 6:53 AM

As soon as we have ‘order’, or ‘control’, over the context, the fact of entropy should warn us that we’re already starting to lose it. Once the loss of ‘order’ or ‘control’ moves far enough towards a tipping-point, we’re likely to be pushed over the Inverse-Einstein boundary into uncertainty and ‘unorder’, whether we like it or not. The key here is to realise that that far side of the Inverse-Einstein boundary is the only space where counter-entropy becomes possible –  in other words, a place where we can leverage the uncertainty itself to reframe the structure and capability of the variety in our ‘control’-system, and thence to revitalise our ‘useful-order’ in the context.

 

In the longer term, what entropy really tells us is that the only way to maintain order is to let go of order - and to know when (and under what conditions, and so on) to hold onto order, and when to let it go. That’s a real skill in itself… for which the key trick is to choose to let go before it’s forced upon us by that decay of entropy.

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Four principles – 1: There are no rules | Tom Graves / Tetradian

Four principles – 1: There are no rules | Tom Graves / Tetradian | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it
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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:51 PM

Some quotes that made me smile and think - and vice versa

 

...the only real law is Murphy’s: if something can go wrong, it probably will. 

Yet Murphy’s is so much of a law that it also has to apply to itself: hence if Murphy’s Law can go wrong, it probably will.

In other words, most of the time, Murphy’s cancels itself out. Which is why we get the illusion that things are predictable, that they follow rules.Which in reality they don’t:....


The primary purpose of rules in organisations is to speed up decision-making and to clarify roles and responsibilities. Since organisations are also systems in their own right, all of the notes above about the limitations of rules in systems-design also apply here. The natural decay over time of relevance and appropriateness of rules is also a key source of organisationalentropy, which, if not addressed, will eventually cause the decay and death of the organisation itself.


The ISO-9000 quality-system standards provide a useful worked-example of layered structure to manage rules in an organisational context. At the point-of-action, work-instructions provide explicit step-by-step rules, and guidance on how to address expected variance. When the work-instruction becomes insufficient, we turn to procedures that, in effect, describe how to adapt or redefine the work-instruction to fit the context. When procedures prove inadequate to cope with the actual variance, we turn to current policy for that overall scope; and if and when a context occurs where policy will not fit the case, we turn to the vision, as the ultimate anchor for the overall organisational-system.

 

Enjoy!

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The emerging science of ‘collective intelligence’ — and the rise of the global brain

The emerging science of ‘collective intelligence’ — and the rise of the global brain | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it
6stronghands:

via io9:

Over at the Edge there’s a fascinating article by Thomas W.
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What is systems thinking - part III

What is systems thinking - part III | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it

John Wenger

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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, January 4, 2013 5:13 AM

In both of these cases, systems thinking forces us to look at the whole, not the individual parts.  It is the job of the modern manager to re-vision their function from one of “controller” to one of “steward”.  The focus is on purpose, values and meaning.  What does this business exist to achieve or create in the world?  What values will guide us in doing this?  How is this meaningful for the people who work here?  It is the role of managers to ensure that the correct conditions exist for these things to be realised, not to tell people what to do.

Sue Hickton's curator insight, April 14, 2014 3:57 AM

"We must stop ourselves from repeating old mistakes and develop our abilities to think bigger so that we can go further.  Hand in hand with this, we need also to develop greater ease with the complexity we will see before us and greater confidence to deal with being a little less certain about things.  The effects of the system are there, whether we decide to look or not. "

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What is systems thinking? Part II

What is systems thinking? Part II | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it

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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, December 27, 2012 11:53 AM

If we are systems thinkers, we don’t lose the ability (or valuing of) analytical thinking; we are, however, extending ourselves in our abilities to apply both when applicable.  There may be something of a butterfly’s “essential being” that existed when it was a caterpillar, but I think we’d all agree that “caterpillar” and “butterfly” are two entirely different things.  ”Butterfly” is not merely “Caterpillar 2.0″; it is “butterfly”, incorporating some elements of, and transcending “caterpillar”, if you like.

 

It’s about working with things as integral wholes.  It’s about thinking bigger.  Water is inherently wet.  We cannot understand water’s wetness by breaking it down into its component parts; oxygen and hydrogen.  Neither of those elements has an inherent quality of “wetness”.  Similarly, with businesses, we cannot get a truly comprehensive understanding of them simply by breaking them down into their component parts.  Everything is connected to everything else and we are limited in our abilities to manage them effectively if we isolate “problem parts”.  Making a holistic assessment of the system will give us a bigger picture view that highlights strengths, inter-relationships, tensions, the forces at work (both from within and without the system) and areas of hope (where intervention can be applied).

 
Sue Hickton's curator insight, April 14, 2014 3:51 AM

"If we are systems thinkers, we don’t lose the ability (or valuing of) analytical thinking; we are, however, extending ourselves in our abilities to apply both when applicable."

 

"Systems thinking is a fundamental change to business orthodoxy.  The assumptions we hold about the business of business mostly orient us to measure things that don’t matter and attack problems that are only really indicators of a systemic pattern.  We try to find answers for questions that are often irrelevant.  Time to think bigger"

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What is systems thinking? (Part I)

What is systems thinking? (Part I) | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it
Viktor Markowski's insight:

Analytical thinking is hitting the laws of physics and has been found wanting.  The analytical mindset is at the foundation of our educational systems, our political systems, our financial systems and the business of business, all of which are reaching the end of their effectiveness in a world characterised by increasing complexity, volatility, uncertainty and ambiguity.  This is being felt by many, but the awareness of what underlies it is lagging behind, so in an effort to ameliorate chronically low employee engagement, increasingly low voter turnout at elections, poor customer loyalty, or low attainment at school, we deploy little tricks or try to invent new “tools” or “techniques”.  However, all the tools and techniques in the world are useless to really address these issues if they come out of the same old mechanistic, analytical mindset.  A more sophisticated mindset is required first.  A new kind of thinking, not a new trick devised out of old thinking, is required.

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15 Awesome Quotes on Collaboration| The Committed Sardine

15 Awesome Quotes on Collaboration| The Committed Sardine | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it


The need to collaborate with others is a big deal for how today's students love to take control of their own learning. Idea Champions provides us with 15 great quotes in praise of collaboration in the following article.

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This Will Make You Smarter: 151 Big Thinkers Each Pick a Concept to Enhance Your Cognitive Toolkit

This Will Make You Smarter: 151 Big Thinkers Each Pick a Concept to Enhance Your Cognitive Toolkit | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it

Every year for more than a decade, intellectual impresario and Edge editor John Brockman has been asking the era’s greatest thinkers a single annual question, designed to illuminate some important aspect of how we understand the world. In 2010, he asked how the Internet is changing the way we think. In 2011, with the help of psycholinguist Steven Pinker and legendary psychologist Daniel Kahneman, he posed an even grander question: “What scientific concept will improve everybody’s cognitive toolkit?” The answers, featuring a wealth of influential scientists, authors, and thought-architects, are released today in This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking — a formidable anthology of short essays by 151 of our time’s biggest thinkers on subjects as diverse as the power of networks, cognitive humility, the paradoxes of daydreaming, information flow, collective intelligence, and a dizzying, mind-expanding range in between. Together, they construct a powerful toolkit of meta-cognition — a new way to think about thinking itself.

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Watch this highly entertaining and well explaining video on 'The Wisdom of the Crowds' (4m50)

http://www.pbs.org/nova/sciencenow Ask enough people to estimate something, and the average of all their guesses will get you surprisingly close to the right...
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TEDxManitoba - TJ Dawe: An Experiment in Collective Intelligence

TJ Dawe writes, performs, directs, and creates new theatre pieces. Based in Vancouver, he's been touring theatre and comedy festivals in Canada and the US fo...
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4 Innovative Crowdsourcing Tools for Business

4 Innovative Crowdsourcing Tools for Business | Collective intelligence | Scoop.it

Crowdsourcing has generated a lot of buzz recently as innovators discover new ways to monetize the concept. For marketers, it’s a chance to channel the ideas of millions and creatively mobilize consumers to promote your brand. But that’s not he only way you can leverage the crowd.


To respond to this burgeoning interest, developers have come up with myriad new technologies that mobilize the customer community. Here are four innovative crowdsourcing tools.

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