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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
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A Walking City for the 21st Century

A Walking City for the 21st Century | green streets | Scoop.it

In a world where people live more mobile lifestyles than they have for centuries, cities are facing a problem they rarely planned for: their citizens move away. When jobs and resources start to decline, modern cities, such as Detroit, suffer difficult and often wasteful processes of urban contraction. In contrast to this, Manuel Dominguez’s “Very Large Structure,” the result of his thesis project at ETSA Madrid, proposes a nomadic city that can move on caterpillar tracks to locations where work and resources are abundant.

Read on to see more on this provocative project – including a full set of presentation boards in the image gallery.

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Andrew Washington's curator insight, November 9, 2013 2:32 PM

Will you move onto that city?

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A Siberian Eco-city Inside a One Kilometer Crater

A Siberian Eco-city Inside a One Kilometer Crater | green streets | Scoop.it

Eco-city 2020 is a proposal for the rehabilitation of the Mirniy industrial zone in Eastern Siberia, Russia designed by the innovative architectural studio AB Elis Ltd.

The project would be located inside a giant man-made crater of more than one kilometer in diameter and 550 meters deep that used to be one of the world’s largest quarries. The idea is to create a new garden city shielded from the harsh Siberian environmental conditions and instead, attract tourists and residents to Eastern Siberia, with the ability to accommodate more than 100,000 people. The new city is planned to be divided in 3 main levels with a vertical farm, forests, residences, and recreational areas.

One of the most interesting aspects of the proposal is the glass dome that will protect the city and would be covered by photovoltaic cells that will harvest enough solar energy for the new development. A central core houses the majority of the vertical circulations and infrastructure along with a multi-level research center. The housing area is located in the first level with outdoor terraces overlooking a forest in the center of the city, in order to create a new type of highly dense urbanism in harmony with nature.


View diagrams & renderings, and learn more about this interesting approach to urban design, sustainability and renewal at the complete article link...

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How Creativity Works in Cities

How Creativity Works in Cities | green streets | Scoop.it
Author Jonah Lehrer talks with us about the nexus of creativity and cities.

The human imagination is a bewildering process. How the brain comes up with great ideas is mysteriously complex.

Jonah Lehrer's ambitious new book, Imagine: How Creativity Works, takes a fascinating dive into the world of creativity and how it all works, not to mention devoting a chapter entirely to cities.

Lehrer recently took some time to chat with Atlantic Cities and expand on his ideas concerning the nexus of creativity and cities...

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Research in the Urban Transformation Towards Energy Efficient Cities

Research in the Urban Transformation Towards Energy Efficient Cities | green streets | Scoop.it

Among the most significant environmental challenges of our time are global climate change, excessive fossil fuel dependency of our cities and the growing demand for energy and materials – all major challenges of the 21st century and in the meantime some of the greatest problems facing humanity. Almost half the energy consumed is used in cities and urban built-up areas, and avoiding mistakes in the urban development at early stages will genuinely lead to more sustainable cities and less greenhouse gas emission. The Zero Waste SA Research Centre for Sustainable Design & Behaviour (sd+b) is conducting research in the City of Tomorrow and the role materials and energy will play in low carbon urban models. In this context, urban design and the fundamental principles of how we will shape our cities in future is increasingly recognised in the greenhouse debate; this is about time, as previously the debate has circled around active technology for ‘eco-buildings’, but less in holistic systems thinking for entire districts and neighbourhoods.

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Where is the Center of a City?

Where is the Center of a City? | green streets | Scoop.it

Artist Aram Bartholl built and installed towering wooden sculptures in various cities, placing them exactly in the spots that Google Maps had determined to be the city center of each respective city.

By blowing Google’s red markers up to “life-size” and physically planting them in actual places, Bartholl brings attention to the blurring between real and virtual space. His sculptures ask the question: where is the center of a city?

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Making Cities Better: The Scientific American Survey

Making Cities Better: The Scientific American Survey | green streets | Scoop.it

Scientific American asked opinion leaders from government, academia and the social network of our readers to answer a simple question:
What innovation (technological or otherwise) would make a city substantially more livable?

A selection of the most inspiring answers are printed in the September issue. Additional impressive replies, edited for brevity and clarity, also appear here.

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The manifesto of the Emergent Urbanism Network | Emergent Urbanism

The manifesto of the Emergent Urbanism Network | Emergent Urbanism | green streets | Scoop.it

As social media networks have developed over the last few years (and it has taken very few years for them to stake their place alongside traditional mass media) we have rapidly accustomed ourselves to reading about only those things we find most relevant to our own perspective on the world, yet the information that is most relevant is spread out over myriad blogs, social feeds, and search engines. Those portals that do set out to provide news in urbanism rely on antiquated centralized editorial review processes to tell us what we should be interested in, in the same way Le Corbusier edited his magazine.

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America Deserta Revisited: New York to Baltimore - Architecture - Domus

America Deserta Revisited: New York to Baltimore - Architecture - Domus | green streets | Scoop.it
A UK architecture critic takes the measure of US design and infrastructure during trying times in the first installment of a cross-country series...
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10 Techniques for Making Cities More Walkable

10 Techniques for Making Cities More Walkable | green streets | Scoop.it
In Jeff Speck’s excellent new book, Walkable City, he suggests that there are ten keys to creating walkability. Most of them also have something to do with redressing the deleterious effects caused by our allowing cars to dominate urban spaces for decades. I don’t necessarily agree with every detail, and my own list might differ in some ways that reflect my own experience and values. But it’s a heck of a good menu to get city leaders and thinkers started in making their communities more hospitable to walkers.


Visit the article link to read more details and examples of the author’s ten steps of walkability...

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What Makes a Great City: A General Theory of Walkability

What Makes a Great City: A General Theory of Walkability | green streets | Scoop.it

City engineers have turned our downtowns into places that are easy to get to but not worth arriving at.


In Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time (public library), city planner Jeff Speck, who spent four years leading the design division of the National Endowment for the Arts working directly with a couple hundred mayors to help solve their greatest city-planning challenges, turns a perceptive eye towards what makes a great city and how we might be able to harness the power of a conceptually simple, practically complex, immeasurably far-reaching solution in improving the fabric and experience of urban life.


Speck outlines a “General Theory of Walkability,” focusing on the four key factors of making a city attractive to pedestrians: 'it must be useful, safe, comfortable, and interesting. Each of these qualities is essential an none alone is sufficient...'


Learn more about urban livability, how to create the conditions that enable pedestrian-oriented development, and the benefits of this approach to urban spaces to the economic, environmental, and cultural health of a city at the article link...

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Sustainable City-Saving Shelters

Sustainable City-Saving Shelters | green streets | Scoop.it

This architectural design- Cha Eunjin ‘Neo Noah’s Arkshelter’ concept-if implemented, will make Cha Eunjin a hero among heroes for his building is what a modern day version of Noah’s Ark would look like.

It is an entirely sustainable structure that can keep a full city alive and well while the outer world is in ruins. Aside from alleged 2012 disasters, structures such as these will always be in demand for the threats of natural disasters can be unpredictable and damaging...

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Unlocking LU 2: The Re-Representation of Urbanism

Unlocking LU 2: The Re-Representation of Urbanism | green streets | Scoop.it

Continuing the thread of review for the new landscape urbanism website, I'm discussing 'The Re-Representation of Urbanism' by Gerdo Aquino, SWA Principal as well as educator and author of the book 'Landscape Infrastructure'. As a fundamental opening to his essay, Aquino mentions the major shift that has taken place towards urbanization and linking it to Odum's ecological idea of the 'carrying capacity' as these areas continually add more people. It's interesting to think in these terms in numbers we can related to, so the example of the resource base for Los Angeles being about to support 1% of the current population is troubling - as it is a case in point (and a poignant example) of us living well above our means.

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Case Studies on Urban Revitalization

Case Studies on Urban Revitalization | green streets | Scoop.it

Economist Edward Glaeser explains why some U.S. metropolises have bounced back from adversity--and why others will not...

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Review> LA Story - The Architect's Newspaper

Review> LA Story - The Architect's Newspaper | green streets | Scoop.it
No More Play: Conversations on Urban Speculation in Los Angeles and Beyond by Michael Maltzan.

Michael Maltzan has wisely framed his analysis of Los Angeles as a symposium, conversing with ten individuals who share his concerns about the state of the metropolis and its future. All came from somewhere else, and this gives them a critical perspective and a stubborn optimism about the potential of this urban agglomeration.

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Green Cities of the Future

Green Cities of the Future | green streets | Scoop.it
Peter Head and David Singleton: A sustainable world needs big cities to be self-sufficient and development of new energy efficient urban centres (Engineers predict that cities will get greener, more livable.)
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