green streets
Follow
Find tag "programs"
31.5K views | +0 today
green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Greening America's capital cities | Natural Resources Defense Council

Greening America's capital cities | Natural Resources Defense Council | green streets | Scoop.it

The Environmental Protection Agency sponsors an innovative planning program designed to help bring more green infrastructure and green building practices to our country’s state capitals, making them simultaneously more environmentally resilient & more beautiful.


Implemented with EPA’s cohorts in the federal Partnership for Sustainable Communities - the Departments of Transportation and Housing and Urban Development - Greening America’s Capitals launched in 2010 and thus far has been selecting five capitals each year for design assistance.

The idea is that these particularly prominent communities are inevitably ambassadors of a sort for their respective states and for other cities.  Indeed, elected representatives and their staffs – leaders, by definition – from all across their states work at least part-time every year in the capital cities.  What they experience there, good or bad, imparts observations and lessons that can be taken back to the representatives’ home districts or even incorporated into statewide policy.  There are also many visitors to state capitals for business or pleasure, each forming and taking away impressions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How New York aims to raise building efficiency by 20 percent

How New York aims to raise building efficiency by 20 percent | green streets | Scoop.it

In an executive order issued at the end of 2012, NY Gov. Cuomo directed state agencies to improve the efficiency of their buildings 20% by 2020.


Going forward, energy efficiency will be considered as a standard part of the capital project planning process.


To implement this efficiency initiative -- among the most ambitious in the U.S. -- Cuomo also announced the start of "Build Smart NY," the implementation arm of the Executive Order.

Using energy data on state buildings, the implementation plan prioritizes the largest, least efficient buildings first for comprehensive whole building retrofits, to get the biggest bang on energy savings for every dollar spent. 

Identifying buildings with the most opportunity to improve is a big part of driving energy savings, but it's not as simple as it appears. Data from New York City shows that some of its oldest buildings are more energy efficient than those that are LEED-certified.

Efficiency measures include the typical, but all important lighting upgrades, advanced heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems, efficient electric motors and automated energy management systems.

more...
Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, January 8, 2013 7:25 PM

"Improving energy efficiency in our buildings is a smart investment in our present and future," NY Gov. Cuomo says. "Through Build Smart NY, state government can produce significant savings for New York taxpayers and generate thousands of jobs, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions by more than eight million metric tons - which is the same as taking one million cars off the road for one year. Furthermore, most of the projects will pay for themselves as their energy savings will cover their costs, making this initiative a financial and environmental win-win for New Yorkers."

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Metropolitan Agriculture: One Size Doesn't Fit All

Metropolitan Agriculture: One Size Doesn't Fit All | green streets | Scoop.it
S, M, L, or XL-sized metropolitan agriculture? Mia Lehrer, FASLA, Mia Lehrer + Associates, said one size definitely doesn't fit all when it comes to cities, in a session at the ASLA 2012 Annual Meeting.

In an era where it seems like any school or community can start a garden, perhaps it’s time to step back and think about the bigger picture. What’s the goal? Lehrer thinks it’s comprehensive urban agricultural systems that are relevant to the unique cultural, social, and environmental conditions of a city. Metro-region agriculture, if planned, designed, and supported financially, can address issues related to social equity and health issues like diabetes and obesity, while building regional agricultural communities and economies.

The article discusses urban agriculture at varying scales, from the city to rural communities; this is because the footprint of any city really reaches far beyond the core — to the edges, to the suburban and rural communities and economies that make the whole metropolis work.


For more on this analysis of urban agriculture and how to best plan, develop and provide infrastructure for successful and sustainable revitaliztion projects that not only boost the local economy, but community health, read the complete article. Also included are links to resources, programs, and initiatives related to metropolitan agriculture.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

City Bountiful: The Rise of Urban Agriculture

City Bountiful: The Rise of Urban Agriculture | green streets | Scoop.it

At the Greater & Greener: Reimagining Parks for 21st Century Cities conference in New York City, Laura Lawson, ASLA, Professor and Chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture at Rutgers University, described how urban agriculture has experienced explosive growth in recent years.

According to a survey produced by the American Community Gardening Association and Rutgers University, community gardens are now found in all 50 states. Some 445 organizations responded to the survey, listing a total of 9,030 gardens. Of these organizations, 90 percent have seen increased demand over the past five years. Also, some 39 percent of the gardens listed were built just in the past five years. These organizations have a variety of goals, including food production and access, social engagement, nutrition, education, and neighborhood revitalization...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Nearly 90 Communities apply for free Smart Growth Technical Assistance

Nearly 90 Communities apply for free Smart Growth Technical Assistance | green streets | Scoop.it
Applications for Smart Growth America’s free technical assistance are in, and they tell an important story: communities across the country are eager to learn more about smart growth strategies.

Smart Growth America received applications from 89 communities in 34 states plus the District of Columbia. Stretching from Maine to Hawaii, these communities represent major urban centers, fast growing suburbs, rural small towns and everything in between. This broad mix of applicants shows that all types of communities are interested in using smart growth strategies to build stronger local economies, preserve a sense of place and protect the environment.

Smart Growth America will announce the communities selected to receive technical assistance on Monday, November 14th.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Editorial> Architecture in the Streets - The Architect's Newspaper

Editorial> Architecture in the Streets - The Architect's Newspaper | green streets | Scoop.it
It's time to get to work transforming our cities' public spaces. - Short, direct, and lively, The Architect's Newspaper is the essential read in the field.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

4 Ways the Feds Are Making Transit Better

4 Ways the Feds Are Making Transit Better | green streets | Scoop.it

New funding rules should speed up major projects and increase local benefits.

Much of Washington is in obstruction mode these days, but not the Federal Transit Administration. The FTA recently announced changes to New Starts and Small Starts — its main capital funding programs for transit — designed to expedite the grant process. Together the programs fund about half the cost of light rail, commuter rail, bus rapid transit, and ferry systems in the United States.

The FTA's new rule was developed during a two-year outreach effort that considered roughly a thousand public comments. During that time officials kept two main goals in mind: to streamline the funding path of new transit projects, and to consider a wider range of possible benefits to local communities...

more...
Mercor's curator insight, February 4, 2013 6:39 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

4 Examples of Powerful Placemaking

4 Examples of Powerful Placemaking | green streets | Scoop.it

A little-known but very interesting government agency, the National Endowment for the Arts, is quietly leveraging small amounts of financial assistance to make a big difference in helping communities across the country become stronger and more alive.


Whether in Portland, Maine, Pendleton, South Carolina, the Kewa Pueblo in New Mexico, or another of the scores of locations that its Our Town program is assisting in all 50 states, the agency believes "creative placemaking" can strengthen "community identity and a sense of place, and help revitalize local economies." I couldn’t agree more.

Indeed, music, film, the visual arts, and even design tend to get us gathering and talking together, frequently in the same place. Sometimes they reinforce a shared sense of culture; sometimes they provoke us (and others) to think of our communities in new ways; sometimes they are just fun. (Do not discount happiness as important to sustainability.) Often they create vital, new identities or "brands" in cities, towns, and neighborhoods.

more...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Bike Sharing Is One Of Fastest Growing Modes Of Transportation In U.S.

Bike Sharing Is One Of Fastest Growing Modes Of Transportation In U.S. | green streets | Scoop.it
Bike sharing has skyrocketed in the United States since its introduction. Since 2008, 30 U.S. cities have launched bike sharing programs.

As Americans start looking for greener, more affordable ways to get around, it’s no surprise that since 2008, 30 U.S. cities have launched bike sharing programs, and several others are in developmental stages.

If you’re unfamiliar, bike sharing gives city dwellers the ability to rent a bike from various local kiosks and return it to any other location, creating a hassle-free (and gas-free) way to get around.

According to Capital Bikeshare’s 2011 Member Survey, more than 41% of users claim to have cut down on car trips after joining the bike sharing program, driving an average of 523 miles less every year. This calculates to a reduction of 487.7 pounds of CO2 released into the air per person. It’s also created a surge in local bike shop sales, with many users deciding to go out and get their own bike after starting the program...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How “Small Change” Leads to Big Change: Social Capital and Healthy Places

How “Small Change” Leads to Big Change: Social Capital and Healthy Places | green streets | Scoop.it

According to Dr. Richard Jackson, a pioneering public health advocate and former CDC official now serving as the Chair of Environmental Health Sciences at UCLA, the idea that buildings, streets, and public spaces play a key role in the serious public health issues that we face in the US “has undergone a profound sea change in the past few years. It’s gone from sort of a marginal, nutty thing to becoming something that’s common sense for a lot of people.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

BMW Guggenheim Lab: A Bold Six-Year Program to Dissect Urban Culture

BMW Guggenheim Lab: A Bold Six-Year Program to Dissect Urban Culture | green streets | Scoop.it

Consistent with BMW's longstanding cultural initiatives, this week launched the New York leg of BMW Guggenheim Lab, an exploration of issues regarding contemporary urban life. The six-year worldwide tour will reach nine cities to encourage international engagement from the public through free programs focused on contemporary urban challenges, all taking place within location-specific semi-permanent structures.

more...
No comment yet.