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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
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A Clearer Definition for Smarter Smart Growth

A Clearer Definition for Smarter Smart Growth | green streets | Scoop.it
As cities become more conscious of their environmental and social impact, smart growth has become a ubiquitous umbrella term for a slew of principles to which designers and planners are encouraged to adhere.


NewUrbanism.org has distributed 10 points that serve as guides to development that are similar to both AIA’s Local Leaders: Healthier Communities through Design and New York City’s Active Design Guidelines: Promoting Physical Activity and Health in Design.  Planners all appear to be on the same page in regards to the nature of future development.  But as Brittany Leigh Foster of Renew Lehigh Valley points out, these points tend to be vague; they tell us “what” but they do not tell us “how”.

10 Rules for Smarter Smart Growth by Bill Adams of UrbDeZine San Diego enumerates how to achieve the various design goals and principles that these various guides encourage.

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Don't Reinvent The Wheel, Steal It: An Urban Planning Award for Cities That Copy

Don't Reinvent The Wheel, Steal It: An Urban Planning Award for Cities That Copy | green streets | Scoop.it
The world's 567,000 mayors should be poaching each other's good ideas, not reinventing the wheel.

Cities around the world may all be struggling with the same problems, from building affordable housing to boosting internet access, but a lack of dialogue means that local governments rarely copy each other’s successful ideas. The world’s “567,000 mayors are reinventing the wheel, every single one of them with everything” they do, says Sascha Havemeyer, general director of Living Labs Global, a Copenhagen-based non-profit that encourages collaboration among the world’s cities.

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Can the arts save struggling cities?

Can the arts save struggling cities? | green streets | Scoop.it
Backed by millions of dollars in new grant money, "creative placemaking" promises to breathe new life into hard-hit urban areas. Will it work?
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Inside a pop-up: remaking an empty lot with art and community engagement

Inside a pop-up: remaking an empty lot with art and community engagement | green streets | Scoop.it

There has been a lot of buzz recently about pop-up urbanism. From New York to Vancouver, there are a number of new, small projects that reclaim a bit of underused space and turn them into public spaces. I have yet to find a really clear definition of “pop-up urbanism,” but the projects are generally small, often temporary, ways to explore creative possibilities urban space.

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Project for Public Spaces: Fall 2011 Training Sessiona

Project for Public Spaces:  Fall 2011 Training Sessiona | green streets | Scoop.it

Register now for PPS' NYC-based Fall training!

Please read on for more information about the three training courses PPS is offering this October and November. The How to Create a Successful Markets training will be offered during the Summer 2012 session.

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A Local Living Economy | BALLE

When enterprises are locally rooted, human-scale, owned by stakeholders, and held accountable to the rule of law by democratically elected governments, there is a natural incentive for all concerned to take human and community needs and interests into account.

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No vacancy: Unleashing the potential of empty urban land

No vacancy: Unleashing the potential of empty urban land | green streets | Scoop.it

A group of volunteers in Brooklyn mapped all the vacant city-owned properties in the borough, and discovered a remarkable amount of unused real estate...

Less than a year old, 596 Acres is the work of a small core of volunteers, including Paula Z. Segal, a lawyer and lead facilitator for the group. Segal first got interested in the city-owned vacant lots because of a site known as Myrtle Village Green, near where she lived at the time.

Researching the site, Segal learned how much data was available on vacant city land that had not yet been locked down by developers — and she got excited about the potential uses for that space. She presented some of her findings at the Festival of Ideas for the New City last year, and that’s where she met Eric Breisford, a programmer who, like her, is involved in a variety of other projects having to do with access to public space, public data, and decent food. The duo quickly got to work on making the data more accessible in both digital and paper formats.

Together they worked to get a map printed that showed the data they had gathered, and an online version as well. They researched a few lots in greater detail, then wheatpasted the printed maps to foam core boards along with explanations of “what’s going on here,” and posted those at a few lots around Brooklyn...

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Are Complete Streets Incomplete?

Are Complete Streets Incomplete? | green streets | Scoop.it

The “complete streets” movement has taken the country by storm. Few movements have done so much to influence needed policy change in the transportation world- almost 300 jurisdictions in the U.S. have adopted complete streets policies or have committed to do so. This sets the stage for communities to reframe their future around people instead of cars.

But communities can't stop there. Complete streets is an engineering policy that, according to the National Complete Streets Coalition website, “ensures that transportation planners and engineers consistently design and operate the entire roadway with all users in mind — including bicyclists, public transportation vehicles and riders, and pedestrians of all ages and abilities.”

Getting transportation professionals to include pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit users is a key first step in creating great places and livable communities. But that is not enough to make places that truly work for people — “streets as places.” The planning process itself needs to be turned upside-down...

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Proposal Transforms Park Space Under the Manhattan Bridge

Proposal Transforms Park Space Under the Manhattan Bridge | green streets | Scoop.it

Let’s face it, outside of Central Park, Manhattan isn’t known for its abundance of open space. This is beginning to change, however, as in this increasingly innovative architectural age, people are looking to odd, underutilized remnants in the city, from abandoned rail lines to decrepit industrial buildings and toxic waterfronts to create the next amazing public space. One such space sits just beneath the Manhattan Bridge, where Architecture for Humanity has secured a grant and invited nine design firms to take on Coleman Oval Skate Park. Holm Architecture Office (HAO) with Niklas Thormark has taken on the challenge and revealed their program-driven proposal.

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NRDC: LEED for Neighborhood Development

NRDC: LEED for Neighborhood Development | green streets | Scoop.it

A Citizen's Guide to LEED for Neighborhood Development is a hands-on introduction that NRDC developed for local environmental groups, smart growth organizations, neighborhood residents and just about anyone interested in making our communities better and greener.

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New York City Streets Renaissance « Project for Public Spaces

New York City Streets Renaissance « Project for Public Spaces | green streets | Scoop.it

In 2005, PPS co-founded The New York City Streets Renaissance campaign, a grassroots initiative that has catalyzed the transformation of the city’s transportation policy and brought sweeping change to NYC streets in a few short years.

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