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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
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Smart Highway: Glow-in-the-Dark Road in The Netherlands

Smart Highway: Glow-in-the-Dark Road in The Netherlands | green streets | Scoop.it
INDEX: Award 2013 winner Daan Roosegaarde's project has come to fruition with the installation of glowing paint on the highway to guide motorists along.

The INDEX: Award pool of innovative designs in Copenhagen all focused on improving life, with the top design being Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde’s Smart Highway- a plan to bring intelligent roads throughout The Netherlands and eventually, the world. Now, eight months later, the first stretch of glow-in-the-dark road has opened on highway N329 near the city of Oss...

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The Netherlands Is Building A Country-Wide EV Charging Network

The Netherlands Is Building A Country-Wide EV Charging Network | green streets | Scoop.it

A dense, relatively small country, the Netherlands is well suited to electric vehicles, and the new Fastned scheme could be a "benchmark" for other places.


The distinctive yellow stations are about 100 feet across, and covered in solar panels to power things like lights and cameras. Each station, which is located at an existing gas stop, will have four to eight charging points. If all goes well, they could make vehicle charging as convenient as filling a tank, though drivers will still need to wait 15 to 30 minutes before the task is completed.


Find more details at the article link.

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Floating Bicycle Roundabout: What real respect for bicyclists looks like

Floating Bicycle Roundabout: What real respect for bicyclists looks like | green streets | Scoop.it
Take a ride on this floating roundabout for cyclists, in the Netherlands of course.

Drivers, cyclists, and pedestrians all compete for space and safety on the streets of the world’s cities and suburbs. It’s a contentious coexistence, and the ultimate form of respect for any road user is properly designed infrastructure that allows that a person to travel with comfort and safety. In the United States, it’s clear who gets real respect (and infrastructure spending) on a regular basis- that would be the people driving cars.

Drivers have specialized facilities in abundance – take the Interstate Highway System. Pedestrians are more often an afterthought in American road design, although in some communities they are afforded crosswalks and signals designed with varying degrees of sophistication (leading pedestrian intervals, countdown clocks, etc.). And cyclists have a small but growing number of bike lanes – which are more comfortable and useful if they are separated from cars by more than just a stripe of paint. But paint is usually all cyclists get...

So what does real respect for bicyclists look like in practice? Well, one manifestation is the graceful new Hovenring, a "floating" bicycle roundabout that opened recently in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. Suspended above the roadway, the roundabout gives bikers a completely separated route over the highway. The roundabout is also lovely to look at, with a central column designed to be a beacon indicating the entrance to the community....

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A. S. CohenMiller's comment, September 5, 2012 1:13 PM
Ridiculously clever and simple!
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How the Dutch Got Their Bike Paths

How the Dutch Got Their Bike Paths | green streets | Scoop.it
What The Netherlands can teach us about child safety and mass protests as effective policy-benders.

This fascinating short documentary traces the rise of The Netherlands’ famous bicycle paths and examines the sociocultural factors that enabled it, from mass protests to government policy. A living testament to the “build it and they will come” ethos, these safe cycling paths not only vastly improved the city’s traffic system efficiency, but they also helped address an oil and economic crisis, lower carbon emissions, and reduce child casualties by 350%, all thanks to intelligent and focused policy decisions — something to think about as we head into an election year in the tragically car-centric U.S...

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Bicycle roundabout in the sky in the Netherlands, Hovenring (video)

Bicycle roundabout in the sky in the Netherlands, Hovenring (video) | green streets | Scoop.it

The Netherlands is known for its bicycle-friendly streets and bike paths, but even this bike leader has intersections that are excessively large and centered too much around cars. In the case of one such intersection between Eindhoven and Veldhoven, planners and designers created the Hovenring, a beautiful bicycle and pedestrian roundabout elevated above the roadway.

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Innovation & Public Space: Melkwegbridge by NEXT Architects and Rietveld Landscape

Innovation & Public Space: Melkwegbridge by NEXT Architects and Rietveld Landscape | green streets | Scoop.it

The new Melkweg Bridge in Purmerend (NL) connects the old and new parts of the city with a unique design that accomodates both pedestrians and cyclists.


Developed by Dutch studios NEXT Architects and Rietveld Landscape, the bridge crosses the Noordhollandsch Kanaal to connect the historic city centre with the growing Weidevenne district in the south-west and is the first stage in a masterplan for the canal and its periphery. It does so with a steeply arching upper level for pedestrians and a zig-zagging lower level for cyclists and wheelchairs. The massive arch reaches the height of 12m above water level and offers incredible views over the city, with a high lookout that is an attraction in itself, letting users fully experience the relationship between the new and historic center of Purmerend.


"The aim of the design team was to create a new area with a specific identity, which could work as a connector between the old and the new centre," said NEXT Architects' Marijn Schenk...

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Why There's No War Between Drivers and Cyclists in the Netherlands

Why There's No War Between Drivers and Cyclists in the Netherlands | green streets | Scoop.it
Dutch people aren't born knowing the rules of the road. They're taught from an early age.

Bicycling is such an integral part of life in the 

What’s kind of wonderful is the way that they learn.

It’s not just a matter of going to the park with a parent, getting a push, and falling down a bunch of times until you can pedal on your own. Dutch children are expected to learn and follow the rules of the road, because starting in secondary school – at age 12 – they are expected to be able to ride their bikes on their own to school, sometimes as far as nine or 10 miles.

Because this independent travel for children is valued in Dutch society, education about traffic safety is something that every Dutch child receives. There's even a bicycle road test that Dutch children are required to take at age 12 in order to prove that they are responsible cycling citizens...

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