green streets
Follow
Find tag "london"
32.0K views | +0 today
green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

BIG Reveals First Renderings for Public Square at London’s Battersea Power Station

BIG Reveals First Renderings for Public Square at London’s Battersea Power Station | green streets | Scoop.it
The New York- and Copenhagen-based practice will establish their first U.K. project with "Malaysia Square," linking Giles Gilbert Scott’s southern entrance to the Foster + Partners' and Gehry Partners' proposed Electric Boulevard high street.

The total redevelopment, led by Rafael Viñoly, FAIA, is estimated at £8 billion, or approximately $9.9 million, with BIG’s public space linking the southern entrance of Scott’s Grade II with the proposed high street, Electric Boulevard, by Foster + Partners and Gehry Partners.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

London's future skyline captured in new visualiations

London's future skyline captured in new visualiations | green streets | Scoop.it

This series of images by architectural rendering studio Hayes Davidson envisages how London's skyline might look in 20 years time.

Over 200 towers with a height of 20 storeys or greater are planned in the UK capital over the next two decades and Hayes Davidson has visualised how these new buildings will appear alongside existing skyscrapers such as Renzo Piano's The Shard and Norman Foster's The Gherkin.


The images were created for an exhibition opening later this year at New London Architecture (NLA) entitled London's Growing... Up! which will chart the growth of tall building construction in London since the 1960s and look at the impact skyscrapers will have on the city in the near future.

"As London's population gets bigger and bigger, and new development for London takes place within the constraints of the green belt, we have to increase the density of the city," said Peter Murray, who is chairman of NLA and the exhibition curator.

more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, January 25, 12:30 PM

Future city planners and developers will be using some amazing tools.

Christina Guenther's curator insight, February 11, 12:24 AM

I have never been to London but their future is looking very attractive. 

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Norman Foster-Designed Scheme Aims to Transform London into “Cycling Utopia”

Norman Foster-Designed Scheme Aims to Transform London into “Cycling Utopia” | green streets | Scoop.it

Foster + Partners has unveiled a scheme that aims to transform London’s railways into cycling freeways. The plausible proposal, which was designed with the help of landscape firm Exterior Architecture and transportation consultant Space Syntax, would connect more than six million residents to an elevated network of car-free bicycle paths built above London’s existing railway lines if approved.

“SkyCycle is a lateral approach to finding space in a congested city,” said Norman Foster, who is both a regular cyclist and the president of Britain’s National Byway Trust. ”By using the corridors above the suburban railways, we could create a world-class network of safe, car free cycle routes that are ideally located for commuters.”


more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, January 3, 1:23 PM

Bikers in London better have some good rain gear. :-)

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Thomas Heatherwick's Garden Bridge: Creating Connections & Green Space in London

Thomas Heatherwick's Garden Bridge: Creating Connections & Green Space in London | green streets | Scoop.it

Architect Thomas Heatherwick, together with actor and green activist Joanna Lumley have conceived what they call the ‘garden bridge’; a scheme that sees a lush green space connecting north and south london, in response to a call for proposals simed at improving pedestrian links across the river Thames.


The structure is an elevated garden that will offer a place in which to enjoy unparalleled views of the city, while providing new walking routes between the popular covent garden and soho quarters. It will also enhance London’s already rich and diverse horticultural heritage of allotments and community gardens, heathlands, parks and squares; further fulfilling its reputation for being one of the greenest urban areas of its size in the world.

more...
Sharon McLean's curator insight, December 21, 2013 6:48 PM

Urban Sustainability 

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Why Cycle Cities Are the Future

Why Cycle Cities Are the Future | green streets | Scoop.it

The 2010 launch of the “Boris Bike” – London’s cycle hire scheme, was the clearest indication to date that cycling was no longer just for a minority, but a healthy, efficient and sustainable mode of transport that city planners wanted in their armoury.


There are now more than 8,000 Boris Bikes and 550+ docking stations in Central London. And the trend’s not anomalous to London: Wikipedia reports that there are 535 cycle-share schemes in 49 countries, employing more than half a million bikes worldwide.

However, the real question is: will cycling actually change the city?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Inspired By Design
Scoop.it!

Thomas Heatherwick reveals garden bridge designed for River Thames

Thomas Heatherwick reveals garden bridge designed for River Thames | green streets | Scoop.it
Thomas Heatherwick reveals garden bridge designed for the River Thames in London in collaboration with Joanna Lumley.


The design was developed by Heatherwick Studio after Transport for London awarded it to develop ideas for improving pedestrian links across the river.

"With its rich heritage of allotments, gardens, heathland, parks and squares, London is one of the greenest cities in the world," says Thomas Heatherwick. "In this context we are excited to have been selected by TFL to explore the opportunity of a pedestrian river crossing. The idea is simple; to connect north and south London with a garden."


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Building The High Line In London...

Building The High Line In London... | green streets | Scoop.it

New York’s High Line is one of the most successful redevelopment projects in recent urban history. A mile-long section of a former elevated freight railway that was mothballed in the 1980s, it re-opened in 2009 as an urban park, and has become a huge hit with both tourists and Manhattanites alike: a project that has been a catalyst for regeneration, and one so successful that it has begun to attract a critical backlash.

London doesn’t want for disused infrastructure, which got us wondering: could our city have its own High Line? Turns out we weren’t the only ones pondering the idea: in early October the Garden Museum is running a High Line Symposium, at which the project’s founders will visit London and discuss how they brought it to fruition. Simultaneously, the Mayor’s office is launching A High Line for London: Green Infrastructure Ideas for a New London Landscape, an open competition to “design innovative new places that enrich London’s Infrastructure”...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

The Playful City + Urban Renewal: the London Festival of Architecture

The Playful City + Urban Renewal: the London Festival of Architecture | green streets | Scoop.it
This year's edition of the London Festival of Architecture invites architects, planners and the public to reflect on whether cities do actually provide the best environment for people to improve their quality of life.

More of the world's population than ever before live in cities, and the trend looks set to continue. Whether cities do actually provide the best environment for a high quality of life remains uncertain, however. An architecture festival is one way to focus the attention of architects, planners & the public on that crucial question, hence the London Festival of Architecture (LFA).

 

If the festival has a headlining act, it is perhaps the London Pleasure Gardens, which present an unusual vision of urban renewal in the capital's former industrial heartland. Inspired by the English pleasure garden, the 60,000 square metre site, surrounded by dilapidated industrial mills and landmarks, includes oddities such as a golf-ball-like concert hall, monopoly houses and an oyster bar with a grass roof that doubles as seating for the open-air cinema.

Renewal at the micro-scale is also being tested at LFA 2012. Gibbon's Rent, near the Shard at London Bridge, used to be one of those neglected back alleys that people avoided. Architect Andrew Burns and landscape architect Sarah Eberle have turned it into a "theatre of the jungle", or at least the beginnings of one, as the winding garden has been left incomplete to encourage local residents and businesses to take ownership of it and to develop it as they see fit. That bottom-up approach may become a bigger factor in city planning: similarly inspired projects are a feature of this year's festival...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

AOR's floating platform, Viewpoint, offers glimpses of London canal-side wildlife

AOR's floating platform, Viewpoint, offers glimpses of London canal-side wildlife | green streets | Scoop.it

Finnish studio AOR has installed an angular canal-side platform in King's Cross, London, where visitors can make contact with some of the local wildlife.

Named Viewpoint, the floating structure sits over the Regent's Canal on the edge of the Camley Street nature reserve. It provides a habitat for birds and bats, as well as an outdoor classroom where people can learn about the surrounding flora and fauna.

"We hope that Viewpoint will have resonance beyond its modest footprint and allow the many visitors to Camley Street Natural Park to discover this natural environment - a rarity in a metropolitan city such as London," added the architects.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

London Gets Fully Electric Buses for Public Transit

London Gets Fully Electric Buses for Public Transit | green streets | Scoop.it
The Guardian recently announced that in early 2014, London will introduce the world's first fully electric buses into its public transportation system to reduce the city's carbon footprint.


Hybrid electric and fuel buses have already been operational in London since 2006, and the city is expected to increase its hybrid fleet from the current 600 to 1,700 — one-fifth of all city buses — over the next two years.  To further decrease the city’s carbon footprint, London will introduce fully electric buses into its public transit system in early 2014.

On December 19, The Guardian reported that two solely battery-powered buses hit the streets of London on a trial basis to test the technology. These single-deck buses are the first of their kind, and six more will begin operating within the next several months.

more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, January 8, 1:47 PM

Quiet, less pollution and efficient choice

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Gehry and Foster team up on Battersea Power Station redevelopment

Gehry and Foster team up on Battersea Power Station redevelopment | green streets | Scoop.it

Los Angeles firm Gehry Partners will collaborate with London office Foster + Partners to carry out phase three of the Rafael Viñoly-designed masterplan, adding a shopping street to connect the old Victorian power station with a new London Underground station, and building residential neighbourhoods on either side.

The two firms will co-design the retail stretch, known as The High Street, which will encompass shops, restaurants, a library, a hotel and a leisure centre. Foster + Partners will add residential buildings to the east, while Gehry will work on the residential zone to the west - the architect's first major project in the UK.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from innovative design
Scoop.it!

London’s Largest “Living Wall”

London’s Largest “Living Wall” | green streets | Scoop.it

The Rubens at the Palace Hotel in Victoria, London, has unveiled the city’s largest “living wall” – a vertical landscape, composed of 16 tons of soil and 10,000 plants, designed to reduce urban flooding. Taking two months to construct and covering 350 square feet, the 21 meter high wall will beautify the cityscape year round with seasonal flowers such as strawberries, butter cups and winter geraniums.

This project is only one of many living rooftops and walls that London has been promoting to mitigate flooding, absorb rain and improve the appearance of buildings. These living surfaces are capable of improving the air quality in an area, deadening noise and helping to keep buildings cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. The vegetation can also trap microscopic pollutants which in high concentrations may cause respiratory illnesses.

more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, October 6, 2013 12:08 AM

Vertical landscaping

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

A Proposal To Transform London’s BT Tower Into A Pollution Harvester

A Proposal To Transform London’s BT Tower Into A Pollution Harvester | green streets | Scoop.it

Royal College of Art graduate Chang-Yeob Lee’s ‘Synth[e]tech[e]cology’ project aims to repurpose the BT Tower into pollution harvesting skyscraper that extracts carbon from petrol fumes to produce sustainable bio-fuels. 

Lee chose to base his design around the 620-ft telecommunications tower because of its predicted redundancy and its location in one of the most polluted areas in London. The redesigned tower would serve as a way to gather economically valuable resources from pollutants in the atmosphere while reducing the level of respiratory illness in the city. 

“Pollution is nothing but the resources we are not harvesting”, said Lee. “We allow them to disperse because we've been ignorant of their value. Pollution could be another economy.”
The tower will also include “a vertical oil field laboratory and a laboratory for future resources present in the atmosphere”.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How can cities be designed for sustainable living?

How can cities be designed for sustainable living? | green streets | Scoop.it
How can cities be designed for sustainable living?


A new interactive exhibition from the Guardian, 'Our Urban Future', explores the importance of cities in making the world a more sustainable place. The exhibition at The Crystal in London's Docklands seeks to challenge and reinvent the way we think about cities and gives visitors the chance to learn how they can make a contribution to sustainable living.

Scroll through the gallery showcasing snippets from the exhibition, and read responses on how cities can be designed for sustainable living and share what you think urban environments will look like in future...


Visit the link for a slideshow of exhibition highlights, including:

  • The immersive Forces of Change theatre: a global view of the challenges and opportunities that climate change, demographic change and urbanisation raise.
  • The Creating Cities game: exploring issues around city management and urban planning.
  • The Go Electric Zone: the challenges and solutions to balancing energy supply, demand and storage.
  • The Water is Life Zone: harvested rainwater is used to shed light on desalination, purity and resources.
  • The ‘Future Life’ film gallery: how London, New York and Copenhagen look forward to 2050, and envisioning how our cities could develop if sustainable solutions are embraced.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Unused Laneways Ideal for Urban Gardens

Unused Laneways Ideal for Urban Gardens | green streets | Scoop.it
An urban backdrop brings with it extensive challenges for landscape architects.

While such a backdrop allows them the opportunity to be creative, think outside the box and juxtapose the built and the organic to create a high-impact focus, there is no doubting the limitations it also creates.
This is perhaps part of the reason why, when projects interlink both built and organic means, they are so widely recognised.
Australian architect Andrew Burns’ recently-revealed works for a London public garden is a case in point. Undertaken as a part of the Cityscapes Festival, garden installations have been unveiled throughout London’s Southbank region, with Burns’ particular landscape plot positioned in a former bypass laneway known as Gibbon’s Rent.
Working with landscape expert Sarah Eberle, Burns was able to transform the highly industrial space into a hidden belt that he hopes will promote community socialization as much as it does environmental reclamation...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Can the Olympics Bring Affordable Housing to London?

Can the Olympics Bring Affordable Housing to London? | green streets | Scoop.it
By 2031, this summer's Olympic site should be a dense checkerboard of housing and parkland.

The afterlife of London’s Olympic Park was partially confirmed last week, when officials agreed to plans for the construction of a new neighborhood on part of its site once this summer's games are over.

Called Chobham Manor, the 960-home neighborhood should be ready by autumn 2013, and will cover the current location of the Olympic basketball court (plus, one imagines, a little bit more of the park). It’s just the beginning of plans to cover London’s Lower Lea Valley area with badly needed new housing – four other neighborhoods providing a total of 6,800 homes are also in the pipeline, and by 2031, the former Olympic site should be a dense checkerboard of housing and parkland.

In an area that currently attracts few professionals with children, the new neighborhood aims to be especially family friendly, with four schools included in the blueprints. The plan so far is to have 35 percent of its housing fixed at affordable rents, making some of it suitable for people already living in this lower income area...

more...
No comment yet.