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thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
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Eco Villa Concepts in Flavors Orchard, China by Vincent Callebaut Architecture

Eco Villa Concepts in Flavors Orchard, China by Vincent Callebaut Architecture | green streets | Scoop.it

Vincent Callebaut Architecture have designed a series of plus-energy villas for a self contained eco community in China. The Flavors Orchard project aims to encourage sustainable developments in China by showcasing the economic and environmental advantages of self sufficient buildings with efficient automated energy systems...

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Sprouting Eco-Cities: Sustainability Trend-Setters Or Gated Communities?

Sprouting Eco-Cities: Sustainability Trend-Setters Or Gated Communities? | green streets | Scoop.it

Not only are many cities bursting at the seams from urban overcrowding; they are also increasingly starting to bear the strains of climate change.

Although there are numerous solutions to either challenge, the building up of new "eco-cities" tries to kill the two birds with one stone. But what is the role of these master-planned communities in our sustainable futures?

The concept of an isolated, ecologically minded community is by no means a new one. The forward-thinking Buckminster Fuller was talking about "domed communities" in the 1960s, and in 1975 writer Ernest Callenbach published his novel Ecotopia, greatly influencing the green movements that would quickly follow.

While smaller versions may have grown more organically, contemporary Eco-Cities are often top-down master plans designed by big-name firms. Since many of these Eco-Cities are still under development, we can only speculate about their future performance and whether they will be flexible enough to function as a "real city."


Visit the link to read the complete article.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, August 12, 2013 1:43 PM

This article raises a good question.  It makes more sense to retrofit existing buildings so why not existing cities?

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A SymbioCity in Malmö: From industrial area to city of tomorrow

A SymbioCity in Malmö: From industrial area to city of tomorrow | green streets | Scoop.it

A once decaying industrial area has transformed into an exciting, sustainable urban environment with a bright future. Sustainability inspired the architects behind this eco-city within a city. The Western Harbour now has its own energy supply and waste treatment system, very few cars – and plenty of satisfied residents.


Clean soil is the start of the eco-city: After decades of industrial and port activity, the soil at Western Harbour was so contaminated by oil residues that a clean-up was necessary before the area could be start its urban renewal.

Water: Surface water is managed via a network of open canals and dams. The system slows down rainwater flow and lush vegetation and vortex technology ensure favorable oxygen content and reduced algae growth. Green roofs on a significant number of the buildings add to the eco-friendly atmosphere.

Energy systems and eco-efficient buildings: The district is self-supporting in terms of energy use. A system powered by renewable energy produces heating, cooling and electricity for residents and is connected to the city's heating grid and power supply network.

Core of the energy system: The Aktern heat pump plant is the heart of the energy network and produces energy for heating and cooling. The energy is then stored seasonally in natural aquifers in wells. A local wind power plant provides the electricity needed to power the heat pumps and also supplies 1,000 apartments with electricity.

Solar cells on the roof:  Rooftops and walls are fitted with solar collectors, meeting 15 % of the the region's heating requirements. The system also includes solar panels.

Transportation: Planned as a standalone community with close access to goods and services, the Western Harbour has virtually no cars. Most residents walk to their homes. Bicycles and pedestrians have priority, and the area can be easily reached from the rest of Malmö on biogas buses operated by the local public transport company.

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Expansive Eco-Architecture Complex Planned for New Orleans

Expansive Eco-Architecture Complex Planned for New Orleans | green streets | Scoop.it

Three ambitious architectural firms have set out on a task to re-develop New Orleans with a 30-million-square-foot triangular architectural complex on the Mississippi riverfront. Dubbed NOAH, or New Orleans Archology Habitat, the hurricane-proof complex will carry 20,000 residential units, three hotels, 1 million square feet of commercial space and enough space for cultural facilities and offices.

The complex will feature green systems, including solar panels, wind turbines, water turbines, fresh water recovery systems and a passive solar glazing system. While still in the planning phases, the project is an example of how architecture should be capable of generating enough power to fuel more than it consumes. 

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 10, 2013 4:55 PM

Eco developments making cities sustainable

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A Siberian Eco-city Inside a One Kilometer Crater

A Siberian Eco-city Inside a One Kilometer Crater | green streets | Scoop.it

Eco-city 2020 is a proposal for the rehabilitation of the Mirniy industrial zone in Eastern Siberia, Russia designed by the innovative architectural studio AB Elis Ltd.

The project would be located inside a giant man-made crater of more than one kilometer in diameter and 550 meters deep that used to be one of the world’s largest quarries. The idea is to create a new garden city shielded from the harsh Siberian environmental conditions and instead, attract tourists and residents to Eastern Siberia, with the ability to accommodate more than 100,000 people. The new city is planned to be divided in 3 main levels with a vertical farm, forests, residences, and recreational areas.

One of the most interesting aspects of the proposal is the glass dome that will protect the city and would be covered by photovoltaic cells that will harvest enough solar energy for the new development. A central core houses the majority of the vertical circulations and infrastructure along with a multi-level research center. The housing area is located in the first level with outdoor terraces overlooking a forest in the center of the city, in order to create a new type of highly dense urbanism in harmony with nature.


View diagrams & renderings, and learn more about this interesting approach to urban design, sustainability and renewal at the complete article link...

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China Looks to Future with Tianjin Eco-city...

China Looks to Future with Tianjin Eco-city... | green streets | Scoop.it

With a cityscape that is all cranes and thrusting new towerblocks, Tianjin Eco-city could at first glance be any of the hundreds of urban areas in China expanding at a breathless pace.

But this joint Chinese-Singaporean project, which was started in 2008 and will be finished in 2020, aims to be something very different from the norm: a model for more sustainable development in a country urbanising at a pace unprecedented in history.

"With rapid urbanization, there will be new cities being built. When you're building new cities you start by going for principles of sustainability," says the project's chief executive, Ho Tong Yen, a Singaporean diplomat and government official...

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