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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary all rank in top five on list of world’s most liveable cities

Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary all rank in top five on list of world’s most liveable cities | green streets | Scoop.it
Three Canadian cities have again cracked the top five on a ranking of the world’s most liveable places. In the latest report from the Economist Int (#Vancouver is #3 on the 2012 Most Livable Cities in the World!

 

In the latest report from the Economist Intelligence Unit, Vancouver ranked third, followed by Toronto and Calgary in fourth and fifth respectively. The Canadian cities were bested only by Vienna in second and Melbourne, which topped The Economist’s Liveability Ranking.

The annual survey of 140 cities uses more than 30 factors to gauge the state of healthcare, education, infrastructure, stability, culture and environment — rendering a score out of 100.

Vancouver lost marks only for petty crime rates, availability of quality housing and congested road networks, with report authors citing a series of infrastructure projects such as the new Evergreen transit line “that will no doubt have a long-term benefit, but in the short-term they can be disruptive.”

 

The results vary little from the last ranking released six months ago, with Vancouver maintaining the third spot after slipping from first place in 2011.

Most of the top-tier countries are separated by fractions of a percentage — the first-ranked Melbourne is scored 97.5, only 1.8 points higher than 10th-place Auckland, N.Z. The Economist Information Unit uses the ranking to provide suggestions on how businesses should compensate employees working abroad in cities “where living conditions are particularly difficult.”

It’s one of several studies of its kind, but economic development experts in the listed Canadian cities say The Economist report’s catering to business communities could lead to tangible benefits...

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Model urban developments

Model urban developments | green streets | Scoop.it
From the planning laws of ancient Rome to the overhaul of a smog-filled city, here are some examples of design excellence around the world...

Nestling between the Rocky mountains and the Canadian prairies, Calgary's green crown did not come easy. The 1.1 million-strong city, home to the majority of Canada's oil and gas corporations, suffers from regular smog and struggles to hit its greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Yet a series of innovative environmental initiatives have improved the lives of its citizens and led to it being ranked as the world's top eco-city in the Quality of Living survey 2010 by human resources corporation Mercer. Calgary scored highly due to its excellent water quality and availability, waste removal systems, sewage systems and low levels of air pollution and traffic congestion...

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Is this the world's greenest neighborhood?

Is this the world's greenest neighborhood? | green streets | Scoop.it

Victoria, British Columbia, a city that - among other good things - is home to Dockside Green, which some people are calling the greenest development in the world...

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The UniverCity project: An experiment in suburban urbanism

The UniverCity project: An experiment in suburban urbanism | green streets | Scoop.it

For the green benefits of urbanism -- walkability, transit, smaller dwellings, more efficient buildings -- to become a truly helpful climate strategy, we're going to need them in more than just cities. We need suburbia to adopt those features too, because a full 50 percent of Americans live in suburbs (compared to 30 percent in central cities), according to 2000 census data... 


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Narrow Houses: Yes, smaller can be better

Narrow Houses: Yes, smaller can be better | green streets | Scoop.it
As urban planners, architects and developers confront urban sprawl, rising real estate and energy prices, and rapidly changing demographics, these narrow, old working-class Montreal houses offer a glimpse of what sustainable living will look like in the future, says McGill University architecture professor Avi Friedman.

“Narrow houses consume less land and require less infrastructure. Fewer materials are used in their construction, so they are environmentally sound and cost-conscious,” he says.

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