green streets
Follow
Find tag "bicycles"
30.6K views | +32 today
green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Infrastructure in U.S. Cities: New Urban Bikeway Design Guide

Infrastructure in U.S. Cities: New Urban Bikeway Design Guide | green streets | Scoop.it

In 2000, the District of Columbia had three miles of bike lanes. Today, the district has roughly 80 miles of bike infrastructure, and many other U.S. cities have made similar investments. Bicycling Magazine’s top 50 bike friendly cities includes some unsurprising places at the top – Minneapolis, Portland, Boulder, Seattle – but also shows how cities such as Cleveland, Miami, and Baltimore have made important strides in the last several years to improve their bike systems. Several are members of the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), which has put out its best-selling Urban Bikeway Design Guide, first released in 2011, now with an updated second edition this year.

NACTO’s updated second edition is part of their “sustained commitment to making city streets safer for everyone using them.” Reformatted with improved structure, it features photos, diagrams, and 3-D renderings of wide-ranging best practices in design for bike infrastructure...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Norman Foster-Designed Scheme Aims to Transform London into “Cycling Utopia”

Norman Foster-Designed Scheme Aims to Transform London into “Cycling Utopia” | green streets | Scoop.it

Foster + Partners has unveiled a scheme that aims to transform London’s railways into cycling freeways. The plausible proposal, which was designed with the help of landscape firm Exterior Architecture and transportation consultant Space Syntax, would connect more than six million residents to an elevated network of car-free bicycle paths built above London’s existing railway lines if approved.

“SkyCycle is a lateral approach to finding space in a congested city,” said Norman Foster, who is both a regular cyclist and the president of Britain’s National Byway Trust. ”By using the corridors above the suburban railways, we could create a world-class network of safe, car free cycle routes that are ideally located for commuters.”


more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, January 3, 10:23 AM

Bikers in London better have some good rain gear. :-)

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Why Cycle Cities Are the Future

Why Cycle Cities Are the Future | green streets | Scoop.it

The 2010 launch of the “Boris Bike” – London’s cycle hire scheme, was the clearest indication to date that cycling was no longer just for a minority, but a healthy, efficient and sustainable mode of transport that city planners wanted in their armoury.


There are now more than 8,000 Boris Bikes and 550+ docking stations in Central London. And the trend’s not anomalous to London: Wikipedia reports that there are 535 cycle-share schemes in 49 countries, employing more than half a million bikes worldwide.

However, the real question is: will cycling actually change the city?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

European cities promote cycling with everything from ‘superhighways’ to revolving bike racks

European cities promote cycling with everything from ‘superhighways’ to revolving bike racks | green streets | Scoop.it

Cycling through the heart of some European cities can be a terrifying experience as you jostle for space with cars, trucks and scooters that whizz by with only inches to spare. Thankfully for bicycle enthusiasts, a movement is afoot to create more room for cycling in the urban infrastructure.

From London’s “cycle superhighways” to popular bike-sharing programs in Paris and Barcelona, growing numbers of European cities are embracing cycling as a safe, clean, healthy, inexpensive and even trendy way to get around town.

Amsterdam and Copenhagen are pioneers of this movement and serve as role models for other cities considering cycling’s potential to reduce congestion and pollution, while contributing to public health.

The trend is catching on also outside Europe, says John Pucher, a professor of urban planning at Rutgers University in New Jersey and co-author of a new book titled “City Cycling.”

Pucher says urban cycling is on the rise across the industrialized world, though Europe is still ahead of the pack.


Read the complete article for further details on urban cycling, cycle 'superhighways', bike sharing programs, two-wheel parking, mixed-mode commuting and more...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Floating Bicycle Roundabout: What real respect for bicyclists looks like

Floating Bicycle Roundabout: What real respect for bicyclists looks like | green streets | Scoop.it
Take a ride on this floating roundabout for cyclists, in the Netherlands of course.

Drivers, cyclists, and pedestrians all compete for space and safety on the streets of the world’s cities and suburbs. It’s a contentious coexistence, and the ultimate form of respect for any road user is properly designed infrastructure that allows that a person to travel with comfort and safety. In the United States, it’s clear who gets real respect (and infrastructure spending) on a regular basis- that would be the people driving cars.

Drivers have specialized facilities in abundance – take the Interstate Highway System. Pedestrians are more often an afterthought in American road design, although in some communities they are afforded crosswalks and signals designed with varying degrees of sophistication (leading pedestrian intervals, countdown clocks, etc.). And cyclists have a small but growing number of bike lanes – which are more comfortable and useful if they are separated from cars by more than just a stripe of paint. But paint is usually all cyclists get...

So what does real respect for bicyclists look like in practice? Well, one manifestation is the graceful new Hovenring, a "floating" bicycle roundabout that opened recently in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. Suspended above the roadway, the roundabout gives bikers a completely separated route over the highway. The roundabout is also lovely to look at, with a central column designed to be a beacon indicating the entrance to the community....

more...
A. S. CohenMiller's comment, September 5, 2012 1:13 PM
Ridiculously clever and simple!
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Why There's No War Between Drivers and Cyclists in the Netherlands

Why There's No War Between Drivers and Cyclists in the Netherlands | green streets | Scoop.it
Dutch people aren't born knowing the rules of the road. They're taught from an early age.

Bicycling is such an integral part of life in the 

What’s kind of wonderful is the way that they learn.

It’s not just a matter of going to the park with a parent, getting a push, and falling down a bunch of times until you can pedal on your own. Dutch children are expected to learn and follow the rules of the road, because starting in secondary school – at age 12 – they are expected to be able to ride their bikes on their own to school, sometimes as far as nine or 10 miles.

Because this independent travel for children is valued in Dutch society, education about traffic safety is something that every Dutch child receives. There's even a bicycle road test that Dutch children are required to take at age 12 in order to prove that they are responsible cycling citizens...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Swedish Cities Close to Building a Bicycle Superhighway

Swedish Cities Close to Building a Bicycle Superhighway | green streets | Scoop.it
Sweden’s transportation authority, Trafikverket, has approved a four line bicycle superhighway between Malmö and nearby Lund.

With all the handwringing over aging infrastructure, rising energy costs, high speed rail and other public transportation projects that are spiraling in costs, cities and towns could look at solutions that can improve mobility and do not the bust the budget: bicycles and bicycle paths.

Studies have suggested that building bicycle paths can have a sizable economic impact especially when you look at the job-per-dollar ratio. To that end, towns and cities preoccupied with trying to improve their citizens’ quality of life and address metrics like their carbon footprint should take a look at what cities in southern Sweden are planning to improve their local transportation systems...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Urban economy
Scoop.it!

How Amsterdam’s Urban Form Created the Ideal Cycling City

How Amsterdam’s Urban Form Created the Ideal Cycling City | green streets | Scoop.it
Before the bicycle arrived in Amsterdam in the 19th century, the city had undergone six centuries of development, inadvertently creating a compact urban environment ideal for bicycle use.

A smaller city is more navigable by bicycle purely becaus 85% of journeys by bicycle in Amsterdam are shorter than 5km (3.1 miles). Amsterdam’s suitability for a bicycle network is about more than its size, however. A network of canals and 1,500 bridges mean it is essentially a city of islands. Most of Amsterdam’s canals were built to encourage property development, meaning many roads have water to one side and housing to the other. The result is that road widening is almost impossible. Considerations about how to adapt Amsterdam’s centre for cars were ultimately abandoned for bicycle-friendly policies. This included the development of an extensive network of segregated cycling facilities and bicycle friendly policies.

Mixed-use developments typically found in Amsterdam have further enhanced the city’s suitability for bicycle use. With home, work, and leisure opportunities located within shorter distances of each other, residents have easy access to retail, leisure, health and education facilities, critical in establishing sustainable communities...


Via Peter Jasperse
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Urban Bicycle Networks and an Improved Sense of Place

Urban Bicycle Networks and an Improved Sense of Place | green streets | Scoop.it
A good bicycle network offers an easy and environmentally sustainable way for local communities to get around, making a city even more discoverable. But can it improve an individual's sense of place?

It acts as a connection between local services, offering an easy and environmentally sustainable means of transportation. The addition of a bicycle network can open up areas previously disconnected due to poor public transport connections.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Streetsblog L.A. » Regional Agencies Taking Slow Walk Towards Sustainable Funding

Streetsblog L.A. » Regional Agencies Taking Slow Walk Towards Sustainable Funding | green streets | Scoop.it

In recent weeks, regional transportation agencies in Southern California have made some slow moves towards embracing a more sustainable transportation network throughout the Southland. Local “Metropolitan Planning Organization” the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) is poised to pass a long term plan that would dramatically increase bicycle and pedestrian funding while its sister agency in San Diego passed the first regional funding plan complying with the state’s ground breaking greenhouse gas emissions law SB 375 which mandates improvements in air quality with reductions in vehicles miles traveled.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

The Top 20 Most Bike-Friendly Cities According to the 2011 Copenhagenize Index

The Top 20 Most Bike-Friendly Cities According to the 2011 Copenhagenize Index | green streets | Scoop.it
A very comprehensive ranking of cities around the world based on many criteria that matter to cyclists. How does your city rank? Does it make the cut?

Copenhagenize Consulting has just released a very cool index of the most bicycle-friendly cities around the world, ranking the top 20 based on a pretty exhaustive list of criteria. Despite having the word "Copenhagen" in its name, the overall winner for 2011 is Amsterdam with 54 out of 64 possible points (one of its bike parkings is pictured).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

5 Cities, 5 Congestion Solutions

5 Cities, 5 Congestion Solutions | green streets | Scoop.it
Congestion problems are different in every city, as are the solutions.

Here are five cities with five different congestion innovations, each of which has been featured on This Big City in the last two years...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Copenhagen's 'Bicycle Snake': Aiming to Become the Best Cycling City in The World

Copenhagen's 'Bicycle Snake': Aiming to Become the Best Cycling City in The World | green streets | Scoop.it

The Ambitious Cykelslangen by DISSING+WEITLING enables Copenhagen's vision to become the best cycling city in the world by the end of 2015.

The 235-meter-long orange snake meanders 5.5 meters high above sea level from Havneholmen through the mall Fisketorvet, ending at Kalvebod Brygge. This “snake” is actually a ramp and a bridge, called the “Cykelslangen — The Bicycle Snake,” that provides more than 12,000 bicyclists with a safe route through this busy district every day.

The architecture firm DISSING+WEITLING was asked to design a ramp to replace a nearby staircase. Instead of just designing a simple ramp, they went a step further and designed a bridge. The result is a destination and focal point that can be seen for miles from the air and has also completely transformed the area for all who enjoy it.

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 17, 5:08 PM

Option : Urban change and management

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Networked Intelligent Bicycles Are Transforming Urban Riding

Networked Intelligent Bicycles Are Transforming Urban Riding | green streets | Scoop.it

The world’s first open source piece of hardware was the bicycle, according to the Open Source Hardware Association. To be more precise, it was the draisine, introduced as a two-wheeled human-propelled walking machine in 1817.

Technologists of the day added things like pedals, chains and rubber tires, as the bicycle became one of the world’s most widely used and loved machines. Nearly two centuries and a couple billion bicycles later, entrepreneurs are applying computer controls, GPS and wireless connectivity to bikes to help save the world’s cities from automobile gridlock...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Urban Design for Bicycles: a Plausible Sustainable Solution

Urban Design for Bicycles: a Plausible Sustainable Solution | green streets | Scoop.it

Using bicycle-friendly cities like Copenhagen as inspiration, a growing number of cities around the world are changing their urban design to become biking cities.


Each year, Copenhagen eliminates 90,000 tons of CO2 emissions from entering the atmosphere from the sheer number of cyclists versus cars.

Designing cities with bicycles in mind reduces emissions, commute times, urban sprawl and illness. More cities are looking to bike-friendly sustainable development as they aspire to become green.

Urban planners and architects are increasingly faced with the challenge of compacting development and designing a sustainable transport pattern...

more...
ParadigmGallery's curator insight, February 15, 2013 8:46 AM

The photo is Amsterdam...the story is the same....

Etienne Randier's curator insight, November 26, 2013 1:21 AM

A la fin des années 60, Georges Pompidou déclarait que Paris devait s'adapter à l'automobile, revenus de cette hérésie, les urbanistes planchent désormais sur la création d'un cadre de vie conçu pour le bien-être des humains et non celui des machines.

 

guillaume riottot's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:48 AM

what are we wainting for ...

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Urban Planning for Bicycles Hits Second Gear

Urban Planning for Bicycles Hits Second Gear | green streets | Scoop.it
Cities worldwide are increasingly becoming aware of the importance of and opportunities created by an investment in bicycle infrastructure.

This is particularly true in Australia, with the various states and cities updating their biking networks to cater to a growing need for automobile-alternative transport means.
After completing Stage One of the Melbourne Bicycle Plan, the Victorian capital is following in the footsteps of iconic European cycling cities such as Copenhagen and Amsterdam in moving towards developing a more bike-friendly metropolitan area.
The first stage of the plans ran from 2007 until 2011 and focused heavily on making initial networking upgrades and developing the foundations for new cycling infrastructure. The key focuses of that development stage were setting the groundwork for safe networks and developing greater communication with the cycling community.

Now, moving forward with the Draft Bicycle Plan for 2012 – 2016, the city’s commitment to providing ‘safe and connected bicycle routes’ has been further solidified.
According to The City of Melbourne, cyclists’ activities are expected to grow to make up six per cent of all trips to and within the city by 2016. This will account for 15 per cent of inner city peak traffic.
Now that the foundations have been set, city council hopes to build on them with the influence and inclusion of ‘cycling innovation’ standing as the next major goal...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Paris to return Seine to the people with car-free plan...

Paris to return Seine to the people with car-free plan... | green streets | Scoop.it
It's the latest battle in Paris's war on the private car: a pedestrian "reconquest" of the banks of the Seine.

After a slanging match with the right, the city's Socialist mayor, Bertrand Delanoë has won his quest to break up the two-lane urban motorway that has run along the edge of the Seine since the 1960s, and return Paris's riverside world heritage sites to walkers and cyclists.

Next month, a stretch of more than 1km (0.6 miles) on the right bank near the Hôtel de Ville will see the first narrowing of the road to make way for pedestrian corridors, riverside walkways, bars and cafes. Then in the spring the final promised masterpiece of pedestrianisation will be unveiled: a 2.5km car-free zone on the left bank, between the Musée d'Orsay and the Pont de l'Alma, with a riverside park, pedestrian promenades, floating botanic gardens, flower-market barges, sports courts, restaurants and even perhaps an archipelago of artificial islands...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Commuter biking could save US $17 billion a year | SmartPlanet

Commuter biking could save US $17 billion a year | SmartPlanet | green streets | Scoop.it
According to a new report on the public benefits of commuter biking, the practice can generate massive savings in health care.

The U.S. spends around $2 trillion a year on health care, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. Wouldn’t it be nice to find a way to cut back on those costs, while simultaneously improving public health and lowering carbon emissions?

Copenhagen recently published its 2012 Bicycle Account, which enumerates the considerable public benefits of commuter biking. One-third of the city’s population bikes to work, and this has benefited everything from transportation costs to security, tourism, traffic infrastructure, and public health...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Wheely thankful...

Wheely thankful... | green streets | Scoop.it
This Thanksgiving, Elly Blue finds a whole bike basket full of things to be grateful for.

In last Sunday's New York Times, columnist Mark Bittman compiled a list of people and things in the food movement he's thankful for. The bicycle movement deserves its own list...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Sharing time: Tracking the ‘sharrow’ on city streets

Sharing time: Tracking the ‘sharrow’ on city streets | green streets | Scoop.it
Not a full bike lane but better than nothing, the sharrow is popping up in cities everywhere. It's half a solution, but it points in the right direction.

A "sharrow" -- the word is an amalgamation of "arrow" and "share the road" -- is a large symbol of a bicycle topped by two chevrons pointing the way forward. More technically known as "shared lane markings," they're intended to remind two-wheeled and four-wheeled road users to share with each other, and also to encourage people on bikes to take the lane when it's too narrow to ride side-by-side with car traffic.

Visiting Seattle last weekend, it was impossible not to notice that its streets are covered in sharrows. Increasing in popularity nationwide, they got a boost in 2009 when they were officially entered into the federal transportation engineering canon. Seattle got a head start, writing them into its 2007 Bike Master Plan. Other cities began earlier, but I've never seen such a profusion as in the Emerald City...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

New York May Become Newest Bike-Sharing Mecca

New York May Become Newest Bike-Sharing Mecca | green streets | Scoop.it

New Yorkers spent this fall pedaling demos of a new bike that may become as common as yellow cabs. The city chose Oregon-based Alta Planning & Design, to create a fleet of 10,000 rental bikes.

The contract with New York City is a watershed moment for Alta Bike Share, but the project won't be funded with any taxpayer money. Alta has to find a corporate sponsor to bankroll $50 million in start-up costs, in exchange for naming rights or ads on the bikes. Once the funding is secured, Alta expects to hire more than 200 people in New York to set up and maintain the system.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How Biking Can Save Cities Billions of Dollars in Health Expenses

How Biking Can Save Cities Billions of Dollars in Health Expenses | green streets | Scoop.it
If Midwestern city dwellers started biking instead of driving when running errands, they could make their communities measurably better.

Nearly 70 percent of Americans' car trips are less than two miles long. It's a no-brainer that biking instead of driving to take care of these trips is a great way to get exercise while cutting air pollution.

While we've always assumed that the cumulative effect of many individuals making that choice would be longer, healthier lives and cleaner air in our cities, a recent scientific study put some rigor to our hypotheses and proved us right.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Old Parking Meters to Become Bicycle Racks in New York

Old Parking Meters to Become Bicycle Racks in New York | green streets | Scoop.it

New York City is removing its last single-space parking meter in Manhattan today, The New York Times reports. Instead of collecting parking fees for individual spots, the New York City Department of Transportation is converting to Muni-Meters that take up less space on sidewalks and have a better record on vandalism.

More interestingly, the old single-space parking meters will be dismantled and the poles will be repurposed as bicycle racks, the NYT reports.

more...
No comment yet.