green streets
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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
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The City In Motion: Architecture + Mobility

The City In Motion: Architecture + Mobility | green streets | Scoop.it

Cities never stand still, so why should architecture? The future of buildings is adaptability, and mobility can augment the special powers of architecture to encompass greater experiences, while contributing more to the urban whole at large. Still, it’s not enough for buildings to move on their own; it’s the development and infrastructural connective tissues between and beyond city blocks that proves just as important.

The way we get around the city is changing, and so the services that the city has to offer are shifting as well. Fixed institutions like universities and libraries will need to be just as agile as food trucks. Commerce can venture out from their flagship shops on Soho and literally “pop-up” and sprout throughout the city. Similarly, more will be expected from cars and automobile circulation, just as larger urban developments will need to be embedded with urban spaces.

Motion is the key to the future of the city, and the A+: Mobility Award will honor the best project that reflects this fundamental shift...

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Scaling the Urban Future by Blending the Urban Past | Sustainable Cities Collective

Scaling the Urban Future by Blending the Urban Past | Sustainable Cities Collective | green streets | Scoop.it

Recently, the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Seattle-based Preservation Green Lab made urbanist media headlines (including Emily Badger’s January 25 Atlantic Cities story) with a report stating the environmental benefits of green retrofits of historic buildings, as compared to new, state-of-the-art, energy-efficient construction. In addition, a local church restored as townhouses joined the list of intriguing Seattle adaptive reuse projects typical of national trends.

 

As our surroundings evolve, can we create incentives and inspiration for transformational places that are sustainable in form, function and attention to the past? I have touched on these questions before, when highlighting hill towns as placemaking icons and profiling Italy’s re-emerging Matera, the UNESCO World Heritage site also termed “the sustainable city of stone” (in The Atlantic last year)...

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Re-purposing Sydney’s monorail

Re-purposing Sydney’s monorail | green streets | Scoop.it

Recently, the NSW government announced that Sydney’s monorail infrastructure will be demolished only 24 years after it went into service. David Vago, Principal of habitation believes that this is a missed opportunity to retrofit the Monorail structure for a pedestrian focused open space similar to the High-Line in New York.

habitation proposes to retrofit the existing Sydney Monorail structure into a continuous above-ground path through the city. Vago sees the proposal as embracing “the principles set out by the City of Sydney and embrace the agenda and ideas championed in 2030 Sustainable Sydney;”. The 3.6km loop proposal called the High-Lane would become an uninterrupted route though the city. Vago believes that the path “will appeal to recreational runners, walkers, joggers, office-workers, parents with prams and tourists who yearn to see the city from a new perspective.”

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Incheon stadium designed to turn into park after Asian Games

Incheon stadium designed to turn into park after Asian Games | green streets | Scoop.it

The Incheon main stadium being built for the 2014 Asian Games will be transformed into a public park after the sports festival, demonstrating a sustainable design in stadiums in Asia, the architecture firm that designed it has said.

The new stadium will hold 70,000 people for the games, but it can reduce down to a single-sided grandstand for 30,000 afterwards and be turned into a park.

“If the social legacy is done the way it was initially planned, I think the world will sit up and notice that Korea is leading the way in delivering a sports project legacy,” Andrew James, Populous’ senior principal, told The Korea Herald.

The key factor for the stadium’s success after the games will be linking it into the surrounding parklands, transforming it into an open and accessible building for everyone to enjoy. Populous is working on the project with local firm Heerim Architects and Planners.

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Vinnie's curator insight, February 17, 2015 7:42 PM

"Recycleable" stadium design from Korea. After planned use,mstadium can be converted into a park or a smaller venue.