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The Smart Grid in 2013: Charged for Growth

The Smart Grid in 2013: Charged for Growth | green streets | Scoop.it

In the past year, the grid has seen some remarkable highs, while also being tested to meet the basic needs of society.


On one hand, big advances have flourished, fundamentally changing the way we power our lives. Roof-mounted solar panels have gone from a costly oddity to a competitive selling point for many homes and battery-powered vehicles have gained traction.

On the other hand, the idea of progress has been challenged by a slew of weather woes that have shaken consumer confidence in our energy infrastructure. A series of intense storms, heat waves and drought made 2012 one of the toughest years globally for the grid in many years.

So what will 2013 bring? The growth of the smart grid.

A new stage is opening - where the public was once ambivalent about the smart grid, consumers are now starting to demand these improvements, spurred by the need to improve reliability, participation and the resiliency to recover from large-scale grid events.

Going into the new year, pressure to rebuild the northeast's grid with more resilience will further boost trends that point towards investment in these smart technologies to continue to expand by over 10% over the next five years.
And while efforts to date have focused on improving the grid's heavy-duty backbone, a look ahead suggests that coming smart grid efforts will reach more directly into everyday life.


Here's what's in store for 2013...

Lauren Moss's insight:

An interesting look at the future of the smart grid, renewable energy and the trends that are shaping the development of these technologies in the coming year.

In addition to energy generation, the article examines infrastructure, energy storage, distributed generation, public awareness, and social networks as communication tools...

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Anatomy of a Smart City

Anatomy of a Smart City | green streets | Scoop.it

The 19th century was a century of empires, 20th century was a century of nation states and the 21st century will be a century of cities...


This outstanding infographic (courtesy of postscapes.com) begins with some information about our current state of urbanization.


Did you know that 1.3 million people are moving to cities each week?! It then explains the need for smart cities and delves into what is required to establish these intelligent connected environments, how the smart city may take various forms in the developing worlds and what specific technologies are necessary to achieve such grand goals in practice.

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Christian Allié's comment, August 8, 2013 6:20 AM
"« Le 21ème siècle sera spirituel ou ne sera pas »
"The 21st century will be spiritual or will not"
http://lespoir.jimdo.com/2012/08/31/le-21%C3%A8me-si%C3%A8cle-sera-spirituel-ou-ne-sera-pas/
About cities too........may be !
Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, August 8, 2013 11:27 AM

cities of the future....future new human political organizations?

Grd Lyon-millenaire3's comment, August 19, 2013 6:06 AM
It supposes an organization at the world level but which and with whom? Doubtless adds us in a transitional period. The best is yet to come.
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Urban Plunge: Swimming in the City

Urban Plunge: Swimming in the City | green streets | Scoop.it

An exhibition at the Roca London Gallery presents a series of architectural proposals to reclaim natural water sources in London, New York and Copenhagen for recreational use. We spoke to curator Jane Withers about how we can better exploit our rivers and harbours.

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Singapore offers a Global Lesson in Green

Singapore offers a Global Lesson in Green | green streets | Scoop.it

A complete lack of natural resources is prompting the urban island city-state of Singapore to generate its own green infrastructure. Its rapidly growing population, which is one-and-a-half times that of the city of Los Angeles but spread across an area half the size, is another driver. And while the green push is most visible in the walls and bays of vegetation that garnish its stock of high-rise apartments and offices, its impact is far deeper. That’s thanks in part to a government-led sustainable-building certification program that aims to green 80 percent of the city-state’s existing building stock by 2030...

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Clarence Wong's curator insight, September 5, 12:24 PM

Singapore is a green city role model. Can you imagine if all cities and governments around the world put the same kind of effort as Singapore to make the majority of their buildings green?

 

By the way, Singapore is also leading the way this year so far in Asian outbound foreign investment.

http://www.cbre.com.hk/EN/aboutus/mediacentre/asianews/Pages/Newsflash---Asian-Outbound-Investment-1H-2014.aspx

Clarence Wong's curator insight, September 5, 12:25 PM

Singapore is a green city role model. Can you imagine if all cities and governments around the world put the same kind of effort as Singapore to make the majority of their buildings green?

 

By the way, Singapore is also leading the way this year so far in Asian outbound foreign investment.

http://www.cbre.com.hk/EN/aboutus/mediacentre/asianews/Pages/Newsflash---Asian-Outbound-Investment-1H-2014.aspx

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3 Clever Ideas To Re-Use San Francisco's Aging Infrastructure

3 Clever Ideas To Re-Use San Francisco's Aging Infrastructure | green streets | Scoop.it

Called SF RE:MADE, San Francisco-based IwamotoScott Architecture propose up-cycling Candlestick Park and two other out-of-use waterfront landmarks, the Hunters Point Crane and the Islais Creek Silos, providing alternative uses for aging 20th-century structures whose original purposes have become outdated.

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Suzette Jackson's curator insight, August 17, 8:28 PM

Regenerative design requires a certain boldness by government, the courage to acknowledge when infrastructure is outdated and the future is on a different path. Kudo to SF RE:MADE

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Floating cities: Is the ocean humanity’s next frontier?

Floating cities: Is the ocean humanity’s next frontier? | green streets | Scoop.it

Floating cities are nothing new. In the early 1960s, Buckminster Fuller designed a city – Triton – that was intended to float off the coast of Tokyo Bay. It was later considered but never commissioned by the US government.

“Three-quarters of our planet Earth is covered with water, most of which may float organic cities,” Fuller explains in his book Critical Path. “Floating cities pay no rent to landlords. They are situated on the water, which they desalinate and recirculate in many useful and non-polluting ways.”

Fifty years on, with heavy pollution causing climate change and rising sea levels, Fuller’s floating city concept is being seriously considered as an antidote to those problems.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, August 7, 11:18 PM

Ciudades flotantes....será la humanidad del océano la próxima frontera?....

Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, August 12, 4:42 AM

With the advent of climate change and sea level rise, such cities may be necessary in the near future.

 

China has may build a floating city. Chinese Construction Company has already has already commissioned plans to test this ambitious project from a smaller scale, beginning in 2015. http://sco.lt/9K70an

 

The eco-friendly project is expected to be self-sufficient, with on-island food production, power generation, and waste management systems. However, there is little information about how food security would be achieved out in the ocean.

 

More scoops on climate change and food security here:

http://www.scoop.it/t/aquascaping-and-nature/?tag=Climate+Change

http://www.scoop.it/t/aquascaping-and-nature?q=food+security

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The City We Want | Archi-Ninja

The City We Want | Archi-Ninja | green streets | Scoop.it

One could argue that humanity has come to a critical point when looking at our current and future way of habitation.  Industrial civilization is moving towards the destruction of our planet, there is overwhelming evidence of this everywhere. We live without ration and we take our current condition for granted as if it were normal and somehow “part of human nature”, whereas in reality, it is the opposite.

There are lots of people who are working to make a difference, these people do not conform to the given social relationships that perpetuate inequality, injustice, scarcity and violence. For as long as there has been oppression there has been resistance and there are many of ways (theoretical and practical, or even both) in which we can all contribute to the struggle against our current self-destructive way of living...

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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 31, 2:52 PM

Analyse critique du monde des villes (en anglais)

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Chicago's New High Tech Lamp Posts Will Track People & Pollution

Chicago's New High Tech Lamp Posts Will Track People & Pollution | green streets | Scoop.it

Starting this summer, the city is installing a network of high tech lamp posts that will keep track of all kinds of information about the environment and people passing by through sensors. The data collected by Web-connected sensors will be used to help urban planners make the city safer and make traffic flow better. All of this while also tracking environmental factors like air quality.

More information at the article.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, July 9, 12:09 PM

great use of technology

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Washington D.C. – The Most Walkable City in the US?

Washington D.C. – The Most Walkable City in the US? | green streets | Scoop.it

new report from The George Washington University School of Business has unexpectedly named Washington D.C. the most walkable city in the U.S., trumping expected favorites like New York, which ranked second.

Respectively rounding out the top five were Boston, San Francisco, and Chicago. Washington D.C. earned the title of most walkable city in the report not just because it has the highest percentage of office and retail space in its WalkUPs (Walkable Urban Places), but because they are almost evenly distributed between the central city and its suburbs, unlike aforementioned favorites like New York.


More details and information at the link.

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A New Bike Lane That Could Save Lives and Make Cycling More Popular

A New Bike Lane That Could Save Lives and Make Cycling More Popular | green streets | Scoop.it

Nick Falbo is proposing a new protected intersection design that would make intersections safer and less stressful than they are today.

In the past few years, U.S. cities have come a long way to make sure bicyclists are safe on the road, but even protected bike lanes have an achilles heel: the intersection. Most protected bike lanes—lanes that have a physical barrier between bicyclists and drivers—end just before the intersection, leaving bicyclists and pedestrians vulnerable to turning vehicles. Nick Falbo, an urban planner and designer from Portland (one of the most bike friendly cities in the nation), is proposing a new protected intersection design that would make intersections safer and less stressful than they are today. Falbo’s design is taken from the Dutch way of doing things. The bike community has already been building protected intersections into their bike lanes for years. Falbo’s adapted design has four main components- find more information at the link.

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Next-generation high-rises offer glimpses of our urban skyline future

Next-generation high-rises offer glimpses of our urban skyline future | green streets | Scoop.it
The world's cities are sprouting with plans for new towers and skyscrapers, a sign of twin booms in creativity and wealth.

When London has 250 new skyscrapers planned and building departments in cities from New York to Abuja, Nigeria, are bursting at the seams for new tower permits. The new designs display greater technological prowess, unimaginable beauty and true innovation in how people will live in tomorrow's intelligent, dense, high-rise world...

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US Highways Could Be Converted into Solar Farms

US Highways Could Be Converted into Solar Farms | green streets | Scoop.it

Given the predominant role of the automobile in American transportation for both passenger and freight purposes, as well as the sheer length and breadth of the continental United States, roads and highways cover a huge amount of the country.

Scott and Julie Brusaw, the husband and wife team behind renewable energy start-up Solar Roadways, are looking to exploit the potential embodied by this vast road network by develop a technology to convert their surfaces into solar PV facilities which are capable of both bearing vehicles as well as generating power via exposure to sunlight.


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This Lush Floating Billboard Cleans the Water Below

This Lush Floating Billboard Cleans the Water Below | green streets | Scoop.it

Advertising that also serves the greater good? Now that’s something different. This floating billboard is covered in Vetiver; a perennial, non-invasive grass which has found popular used treating wastewater; even when it’s high in nitrates, phosphates and heavy metals. In this case it’s been used to spell CLEAN RIVER SOON, a hopeful message along the highly polluted Pasig River in the Philippines. It’s creators say systems like this have been shown to clean between 2 and 8 thousand gallons of water per day, and simultaniously, it creates a much more inviting place to stroll.

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, June 6, 12:08 PM

Vetiver...a great scent and more? Great story!

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 11, 7:04 PM

Option topic: inland water . Management to improve water quality

Clara Bonnes's curator insight, June 12, 7:36 AM

Love it!

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International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam 2014: exploring the relationship between city and nature

International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam 2014: exploring the relationship between city and nature | green streets | Scoop.it

Blurring the boundaries between society and nature, this year’s International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam calls for a new approach to city-making, under the curation of Dutch landscape architect Dirk Sijmons. The theme, Urban by Nature, is explored through 96 projects in the main exhibition site at the Kunsthal, next door at the Natural History Museum, and in city-wide installations and interventions laid on to coincide with the IABR.

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How San Francisco Is Designing Its Metro Train of the Future

How San Francisco Is Designing Its Metro Train of the Future | green streets | Scoop.it
BART cars are about to get their first real overhaul since the system launched in 1972.

Nearly half a century after the system's launch, BART will get its own long-awaited makeover. The so-called "Fleet of the Future" plan will put between 775 and 1,000 new BART cars on the tracks between 2017 and 2023, at a cost between $2.5 billion and $3.3 billion. But the overhaul is more of a full reimagining than a cosmetic touchup—from the big-picture look of the car itself to the minutiae of floor patterning and handrail grips. BART used the chance to rethink how the trains look on the outside and feel on the inside, how they accommodate the crowds of today and the near future, and how they subtly control rush-hour crowds and all those bicycles...

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Infrastructure in U.S. Cities: New Urban Bikeway Design Guide

Infrastructure in U.S. Cities: New Urban Bikeway Design Guide | green streets | Scoop.it

In 2000, the District of Columbia had three miles of bike lanes. Today, the district has roughly 80 miles of bike infrastructure, and many other U.S. cities have made similar investments. Bicycling Magazine’s top 50 bike friendly cities includes some unsurprising places at the top – Minneapolis, Portland, Boulder, Seattle – but also shows how cities such as Cleveland, Miami, and Baltimore have made important strides in the last several years to improve their bike systems. Several are members of the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), which has put out its best-selling Urban Bikeway Design Guide, first released in 2011, now with an updated second edition this year.

NACTO’s updated second edition is part of their “sustained commitment to making city streets safer for everyone using them.” Reformatted with improved structure, it features photos, diagrams, and 3-D renderings of wide-ranging best practices in design for bike infrastructure...

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Copenhagen's 'Bicycle Snake': Aiming to Become the Best Cycling City in The World

Copenhagen's 'Bicycle Snake': Aiming to Become the Best Cycling City in The World | green streets | Scoop.it

The Ambitious Cykelslangen by DISSING+WEITLING enables Copenhagen's vision to become the best cycling city in the world by the end of 2015.

The 235-meter-long orange snake meanders 5.5 meters high above sea level from Havneholmen through the mall Fisketorvet, ending at Kalvebod Brygge. This “snake” is actually a ramp and a bridge, called the “Cykelslangen — The Bicycle Snake,” that provides more than 12,000 bicyclists with a safe route through this busy district every day.

The architecture firm DISSING+WEITLING was asked to design a ramp to replace a nearby staircase. Instead of just designing a simple ramp, they went a step further and designed a bridge. The result is a destination and focal point that can be seen for miles from the air and has also completely transformed the area for all who enjoy it.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 17, 8:08 PM

Option : Urban change and management

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A Concept ‘Vertical City’ Skyscraper That Supports An Ecosystem

A Concept ‘Vertical City’ Skyscraper That Supports An Ecosystem | green streets | Scoop.it

London-based design and academic research architecture practice SURE Architecture has designed and developed a concept skyscraper with multiple functions.
Called ‘Endless City’, the organic skyscraper is built around six steel tubes with an “endless” ramp that goes around the building from the ground floor, all the way up to the top. 
It also features energy-saving and waste management elements that give the building another purpose—supporting an ecosystem. Plazas and communal spaces will occupy most parts of the skyscraper. 
According to the architects, the shape of the skyscraper “attempts to maximize passive energy and reduce artificial lighting and ventilation”...

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Grant Graves's curator insight, August 21, 10:21 AM

Cities of the future will evolve as our ideals and control of the world change. Future cities as such would not have traffic jams , population woes, congestion, and many other issues that near all cities of today face. In this manner, cities will be designed for the ever changing needs of humans.  These cities will probably be build from the ground up instead of in an existing town or city. Overall, the future in these directions, will allow for a better advancement of the human race as a whole. -GG

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 24, 9:39 PM

Future sustainability - urban architecture

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 24, 9:40 PM

Future sustainability - urban architecture

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7 Big Ways Cities Have Transformed Themselves For Bikes

7 Big Ways Cities Have Transformed Themselves For Bikes | green streets | Scoop.it

The number of bikes in our cities is increasing, and with that increase we’re also seeing some major changes in the way cities are designed. Engineers are giving bikes their own bridges, tunnels, overpasses, even escalators, making biking feel like it’s an essential, permanent part of the city.

Last week, Copenhagen announced an elevated cycleway for the Øresund Bridge, an existing bridge which connects the city to Malmö, Sweden. The second longest bridge in Europe, and at about eight miles long, will likely be the longest dedicated bike bridge in the world. That’s a serious commitment to the cyclists in the region, but also to the health and well-being for all residents. Customised bike infrastructure is more comfortable, convenient, and safe for those who choose to travel on two wheels, but it’s also safer for pedestrians as well. As the biking movement gains momentum, we’ll be seeing cities devoting more space and energy towards these awesome bike-only improvements that make streets safer for everyone...


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Catherine Devin's curator insight, August 4, 2:48 AM

La nouvelle impulsion donnée à l'utilisation de la bicyclette à des fins de déplacement comme de loisir en lien avec l'essor des pistes cyclables dans les villes et à l'orée de celles-ci représente un exemple réussi et concret de notre capacité à évoluer vers un mode de vie plus durable dans certains lieux... Et nous n'en sommes qu'à l'amorce.

 

Ce mouvement repose sur beaucoup plus qu'une injonction à la moindre consommation de carburant/ émission de CO2 ou même la contrainte de coût ou à l'inverse une impulsion citoyenne. Il relève plutôt d'un travail de marketing fondamental par rapport à un objectif d'accroître l'utilisation de la bicyclette en ville.

Il a fallu comprendre les citadins :  identifier les leviers pour les engager à prendre un vélo (vitesse et liberté de déplacement,  activité physique, plaisir...) ainsi que lever les freins à l'utilisation (sécurité, accès à un vélo, parking vélo...) et au final,  mettre en place toutes les conditions de ce retour au vélo : parcs de bicyclettes à louer, voies cyclables...  associée à une stratégie et des outils de communication multiples et permanents.

Julie Wicks's curator insight, August 28, 1:06 AM

Place and Liveability Geography Year 7. 'The strategies used to enhance the liveability of places, especially for young people, including examples from Australia and Europe(ACHGK047)'

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Vo Trong Nghia plans bamboo "lotus pods" for Vietnam's expo pavilion

Vo Trong Nghia plans bamboo "lotus pods" for Vietnam's expo pavilion | green streets | Scoop.it

A proposal by Vo Trong Nghia Architects to build towering bamboo structures modelled on lotus pods has been selected for Vietnam's pavilion at the World Expo 2015 in Milan.

Responding to the expo's theme "Feeding the Planet, Energy for life", the architects describe the consumption of the lotus – Vietnam's national flower – as an example for sustainable living.

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Radical Cities in Latin America by Justin McGuirk

Radical Cities in Latin America by Justin McGuirk | green streets | Scoop.it

A tour of informal settlements from Rio to Caracas shows cities being reclaimed in remarkable ways. But are they a viable template for the future?

In Radical Cities, Justin McGuirk travels across Latin America interviewing activist architects, community leaders and radical politicians who are devising ingenious architectural solutions to urban problems. Against a backdrop of austerity and corruption, he finds them working with marginalised citizens who are trying to meet their own housing needs and claim their right to the city.

More details at the article...

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Community Solar Gardens Bring Affordable Green Energy to the Masses

Community Solar Gardens Bring Affordable Green Energy to the Masses | green streets | Scoop.it

A new trend is springing up across the country that’s making affordable solar energy increasingly available to the masses.

Community solar gardens allow customers who aren’t able to establish their own solar power systems to buy into a solar array built elsewhere and get a credit on their electricity bill for the power produced by the panels. These arrangements that allow people to not only cut their power bills but also switch to more green energy first emerged in Colorado, but have since spread across the country – with laws allowing the projects to progress through legislatures in California, Minnesota and Washington D.C., and one on the books since 2008 in Massachusetts – where the trend is currently taking flight...

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Los Angeles on cusp of becoming 'major' walkable city, study says

Los Angeles on cusp of becoming 'major' walkable city, study says | green streets | Scoop.it
Despite its long love affair with the car, Los Angeles is on the cusp of becoming a “major” walkable urban area. And doing so could do wonders for its real estate market, at least in spots.


That’s the gist of a new report released Tuesday by SmartGrowth America and George Washington University, which measured the number of walkable urban neighborhoods in 30 big metro areas and looked at the potential to develop more...

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Underground Culture: Designing A Museum for Los Angeles' Historic District

Underground Culture: Designing A Museum for Los Angeles' Historic District | green streets | Scoop.it

Downtown Los Angeles’s historic core is about to get its first major museum, if that’s what you want to call it. Local developer Tom Gilmore and architect Tom Wiscombe are teaming up on the complex project, which they are calling the Old Bank District Museum. It will be dedicated to contemporary Los Angeles art and located in the sub-basements, basements, ground floors, mezzanines, and roofs of three interconnected buildings along Main and Fourth streets.

“We’re going beyond the frontier of street level,” said Tom Wiscombe, principal at Tom Wiscombe Architecture and a professor at SCI-Arc. Gilmore, founder of Gilmore Associates, who has been a major player in the resurrection of the Bank District, calls the project “insanely organic.”

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Hamburg Aims To Be Car-Free In 20 Years

Hamburg Aims To Be Car-Free In 20 Years | green streets | Scoop.it
In order create what will someday be a large green network, local authorities are to connect pedestrian and cycle lanes; this is expected to smooth inner city traffic flow.

To live in this age is an exciting time. The technological advances have accelerated communication around the world, and in effect, a shifting of resources to more sustainable alternatives continue to be implemented at an increasing rate. Who knew thirty or even fifty years ago that cars would so quickly go out of fashion in favor of more sustainable, alternative modes of transportation?

Yet this is exactly what is happening in the German town of Hamburg. The city council recently disclosed it has plans to divert most of its cars away from the city’s main thoroughfares in twenty years. In order create what will someday be a large green network, local authorities are to connect pedestrian and cycle lanes; this is expected to smooth inner city traffic flow.


Via ParadigmGallery
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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, May 12, 3:54 PM

 

Locations all around the world are submitting to greener design and methods of living that will support future generations to come. Hamburg is just one of many examples that will likely influence a change in the current system. -

Judit Urquijo's curator insight, June 17, 6:52 AM

La ciudad de Hamburgo (Alemania) se ha propuesto eliminar los automóviles de su centro urbano en el plazo de 20 años


Se trata sin duda de un ambicioso plan para una ciudad con un área metropolitana en la que conviven 5 millones de personas (datos de 2012). Este proyecto, denominado "Green Network", que se enmarca dentro de una estrategia orientada a paliar los efectos del cambio climático, tiene como principales ejes vertebradores una red de caminos verdes de carácter peatonal y ciclable que unirán los extrarradios con el centro urbano. Esta red estará complementada por un sistema de transporte público que tendrá por sello su eficiencia. 


En este sentido, Hamburgo cuenta con ciertas ventajas. Aproximadamente el 8% del área metropolitana es reserva natural, ya que el curso del río Elba ha creado una notable diversidad de hábitats que propician esta protección. Además, el 40% de su extensión está cubierta por zonas verdes que, con la ejecución de este plan, se verán ampliadas. 


¿Utopía? El crecimiento urbanístico experimentado por nuestras ciudades ha hecho del automóvil particular una necesidad. Pero el problema es de conciencia. Nos hemos acostumbrado a querer llegar hasta el kilómetro cero sentados al volante, a pesar del tiempo y el dinero que se consume en esta tarea a veces titánica. Por tanto, para llevar a cabo un proyecto como el que se está ideando en Hamburgo es vital un proceso de reeducación tendente a crear un nuevo modelo de ciudad, pero el mismo debe gestarse desde la propia persona consciente de la huella que produce y no desde la prohibición. Y no todo el mundo estará dispuesto a someterse y a colaborar.


Quizás, por tanto, sean más factibles otras alternativas como las que propone Harald N. Rostvik, que aboga por que sean los coches eléctricos de pequeño tamaño los que reinen en la ciudad en un sistema de car-sharing. 


Información adicional

 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 24, 9:42 PM

Strategies for sustainable urban places - European example 

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Rebalancing Development + Community Building Projects: Reconstructing Post-disaster Japan

Rebalancing Development + Community Building Projects: Reconstructing Post-disaster Japan | green streets | Scoop.it

Nearly two years have passed since "3.11", Japan's worst disaster since the Pacific War. Now, twenty months later, we can start to see the kind of future that Japan has entered, and the values and visions that are animating its architects, designers, and artists in this period of reconstruction and renewal.

At the heart of the reconstruction challenge that Japan faces is the question of the relation between the centre and the periphery, or to put it in starker terms, between the strong and the weak. This relation is expressed in many ways – between global forces or state authority and local people; between the metropolis and the countryside; between the victims and the spared. The earnestness with which metropolitan architects have engaged local communities only underscores this asymmetry. Beyond the immediate response to disaster, what many in Japan are seeking is the rebalancing of a long legacy of uneven development.

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The Next Giant Chinese City Could Float In The Ocean

The Next Giant Chinese City Could Float In The Ocean | green streets | Scoop.it

China is running out of room for its growing urban population. This amazing design--an entire prefab city that floats on water--could magically create more space.

As China prepares to squeeze in 350 million new urban residents over the new decade, the government will pave 5 billion square meters of new roads and build hundreds of new cities and towns. And as available land space gets smaller and smaller--especially near the bigger metropolitan regions where people really want to live--China may also start building cities on water.

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