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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Protecting Communities from Climate Change & Extreme Weather like Sandy

Protecting Communities from Climate Change & Extreme Weather like Sandy | green streets | Scoop.it

New York & New Jersey are inching toward recovery, but there's a long way to go before rebounding from Hurricane Sandy. Across the region, people are lining up for fuel for generators, buses for work & food for families. Many are without heat or medicines, and numerous families are in public-housing high rises in Lower Manhattan without access to safer alternatives.

Experts used to discuss climate change in terms of computer models and scientific forecasts. Now Americans are talking about it in its most urgent terms: people’s lives. When climate change intensifies extreme weather like hurricanes and droughts, our families—and our homes, jobs, neighborhoods, and plans for our children—feel the brunt.

The human toll of climate change is mounting and we must act. America must wake up and curb climate change...

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Hilary Brummel's curator insight, October 2, 2013 11:25 AM

This article was all about protecting cities from the climate change and extreme weather. New york and new jersey are both recovering right now and they don't want to have another contastrofy so they are doing many things to prevent their cities from being damaged again.

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10 High-Tech, Green City Solutions for Beating the Heat

10 High-Tech, Green City Solutions for Beating the Heat | green streets | Scoop.it
From a solar mansion in China to a floating farm in New York, green buildings are sprouting up in cities around the world. Among their many benefits are curbing fossil-fuel use and reducing the urban heat island effect.
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Planning for Climate Change: 5 Ideas to prevent flooding in New York

Planning for Climate Change: 5 Ideas to prevent flooding in New York | green streets | Scoop.it
It's time to start seriously planning for climate change in the city.


New York City didn’t have to flood quite this badly, or, at least, it doesn’t have to again. There's no shortage of ideas out there for how the city could adapt to rising sea levels (or, we’ll just say it: climate change). A lot of them haven’t been deployed or more seriously studied because they seem too expensive or daunting.


But an event like Sandy quickly changes that calculus. Suddenly, some of these solutions don’t look quite as expensive as cleaning up after a hurricane...

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How sprawl worsens the impacts of drought & how smart growth can help...

How sprawl worsens the impacts of drought & how smart growth can help... | green streets | Scoop.it
Our country is experiencing its worst drought in over half a century. Sprawling land use is not the cause of drought, but it can exacerbate drought's impacts in at least two ways.

 

If you live in the US and have been outside lately, chances are you don’t need to be reminded that this is the hottest summer many of us can remember, and also one of the driest, following a relatively dry winter and spring.

As written earlier this week on CNN, our country is experiencing its worst drought in over 50 years. At least 55 % of the US was in moderate-to-severe drought last month, and things have only gotten worse, as June 2012 ranks as the third-driest month nationally in 118 years. Among consequences: 38 percent of the corn planted in the 18 leading corn-producing states is considered to be in poor or very poor condition, according to the US Department of Agriculture.

I’m not naïve enough to claim that the way we have built suburbs over the last few decades is a proximate cause of drought, but sprawling land use can exacerbate its impacts in at least a couple ways. First, the large-lot residential development characteristic of sprawl uses significantly more water than do neighborhoods built to a more walkable scale...

The second way in which sprawl exacerbates the impacts of drought is by with more pavement around watersheds, which send billions of gallons of rainwater into streams and rivers as polluted runoff, rather than into the soil to replenish groundwater...

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