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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
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Farm City - Huffington Post

Farm City - Huffington Post | green streets | Scoop.it

As the world's population expands and we expect to see 9 billion people on the planet by 2050 we are already thinking about the limitations and design of our spaces and our places. Already, 70 percent of fruits and vegetables grown in the United States are grown in urban edged areas with growing pressure for development. New York is also the home to 1.5 million food insecure residents people and many kids growing up in urban areas, sadly, believe that their food, literally, comes from the grocery store aisles. Instead, as volunteers and consumers flock to urban agricultural spaces there is an opportunity to learn more about food production. Community members become excited about their own role in transforming the communities in which they live, and a connection is formed between farmers and consumers, which also serves to deepen the connection between urban dwellers and the earth...

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Detroit: rejuvenation through urban farms, sustainable living & innovation

Detroit: rejuvenation through urban farms, sustainable living & innovation | green streets | Scoop.it

The wide open spaces now prevalent throughout Detroit have given residents an opportunity to reconnect with their food. With supermarkets almost non-existent and drugstores selling mostly processed food (or fresh food imported from South America), civil organisations such as Earthworks are teaching local people everything about growing fruits and vegetables, including planting, harvesting, composting and canning.

"It's not just about surviving," said Shane Bernardo, outreach co-ordinator for Earthworks, the organisation that has led Detroit's urban farming movement. "It's about economic justice, and in the long run, economic resilience."

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How a California city is cleaning up, building green, & protecting residents from pollution

How a California city is cleaning up, building green, & protecting residents from pollution | green streets | Scoop.it
  Over decades, the 14-acre commercial flower nursery in Richmond, California became a severely blighted site, its old greenhouses falling into disrepair and its soil polluted with years of pesticide and herbicide applications. 

After the nursery closed, contamination posed an obstacle to redevelopment. Not a great place for housing, one might think.

But think again: these challenges are being overcome as the site is cleaned of contaminants and transformed into what will be the city’s greenest new residential development.

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Could cities rely 100% on urban agriculture for their food?

Could cities rely 100% on urban agriculture for their food? | green streets | Scoop.it
A recent study finds that cities could use vacant lots, rooftops, and backyards for urban agriculture to become self-reliant in basic food needs.
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Former Malt Factory in Berlin to Become Aquaponic Rooftop Farm

Former Malt Factory in Berlin to Become Aquaponic Rooftop Farm | green streets | Scoop.it

The concept of urban agriculture is fast taking root in our cities, and while images of towering vertical farms with high-altitude pastures and verdant exteriors may captivate us with their fantastical designs, the greatest leaps and bounds in this area stem from simple, tried and true farming methods and adaptive reuse of pre-existing structures. The latest “farm of the future” on the horizon: the Frisch vom Dach, or the Fresh from the Roof project in Berlin. Der Spiegel recently reported on the efforts of three German entrepreneurs to transform the expansive rooftop of a former malt factory in Berlin into a sustainable urban farm projected to produce tons of vegetables and fish for the city each month.

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Back to the Start

Back to the Start | green streets | Scoop.it

As more and more empty and abandoned lots are transformed into active, productive neighborhood farms, communities begin to gain control of providing for themselves. As more and more rooftops are becoming vibrant gardens, like this one in Brooklyn, Gotham Greens, healthier produce is available to urban communities that may have not had access to organic fruits and vegetables previously.

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The Local Food System

The Local Food System | green streets | Scoop.it

CITIES is re-interpreting urban farming as an asset for the city economy. This approach to the subject is neither revolutionary nor especially innovative, yet in the collation of an original set of parameters (community activity, urban landscapes and design applications) with existing approaches, new directions emerge...

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New report on the potential for urban agriculture

New report on the potential for urban agriculture | green streets | Scoop.it

A new report by the Urban Design Lab (UDL) of Columbia University’s Earth Institute explores the potential for urban agriculture in New York City. The report, “The Potential for Urban Agriculture in New York City,” complements the existing discussion on sustainable cities. Developing agricultural spaces within or near urban areas has a great potential to reduce food transportation costs and environmental effects, as well as provide opportunities for economic development and diminish the disparities in access to healthy foods. In order to become a viable option to food production for the masses, urban agriculture must overcome challenges of scalability, energy efficiency and labor costs.

To understand the capacity of New York City’s crop production, UDL’s report aims to answer how much land could be productively used for agriculture and how much crop could realistically be grown in the given land. When it comes to the benefits of urban agriculture in New York City, the study also considers factors like food security, storm water runoff and sewer overflow mitigation, urban heat island effect, energy consumption, waste reduction, as well as opportunities for composting for agricultural purposes.

Full article here: http://thecityfix.com/blog/new-report-the-potential-for-urban-agriculture/trackback/

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