green streets
Follow
Find tag "sustainability"
30.1K views | +11 today
green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Vo Trong Nghia plans bamboo "lotus pods" for Vietnam's expo pavilion

Vo Trong Nghia plans bamboo "lotus pods" for Vietnam's expo pavilion | green streets | Scoop.it

A proposal by Vo Trong Nghia Architects to build towering bamboo structures modelled on lotus pods has been selected for Vietnam's pavilion at the World Expo 2015 in Milan.

Responding to the expo's theme "Feeding the Planet, Energy for life", the architects describe the consumption of the lotus – Vietnam's national flower – as an example for sustainable living.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Top 10 States for Green Building

Top 10 States for Green Building | green streets | Scoop.it

Some states have been more proactive in getting LEED-certified buildings built than others. Which has the most sustainable square feet per citizen?

People don't usually think of Illinois as the greenest state in the union, but it happens to have the most green buildings per capita, according to the latest figures from the U.S. Green Building Council. California had the most projects overall. States like Louisiana and Montana? Not so much.


Find a list of the top 10 LEED-certified states (by per capita square footage) at the article link.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Earth Screening: the Winning proposal for Holland 'sustainable farming' pavilion at Expo Milano 2015

Earth Screening: the Winning proposal for Holland 'sustainable farming' pavilion at Expo Milano 2015 | green streets | Scoop.it

New Holland Agriculture have chosen the winner of the international competition for their 1,500 square meters pavilion at the World Expo 2015 in Milan. The proposal, by Carlo Ratti Associati, is called Earth Screening, and features an agricultural field on its roof, similar to a giant 3D printer thanks to the constant activity of two robotized, self-driving tractors.

Emanuela Recchi, chairman of Recchi Engineering, describes Earth Screening as “a pavilion capable of expressing the principles of sustainability, efficiency, and energy production of a modern ‘Sustainable Farm’.” The design concept proposes an innovative and efficient pavilion, allowing visitors to interact with the latest research, products and innovations developed by New Holland.

The aim is that the energy for the pavilion – including that for the selfdriving tractors on the roof – will be generated on site. After the Expo, the New Holland pavilion will be dismantled and reconstructed in a second location as an innovative didactic farm, embodying the very idea of recycling and sustainability.


more...
Donovan Gillman's curator insight, December 9, 2013 2:58 AM

Is this the future or is it just another "futurescape" daydream?

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Sustainable Urban Metabolism: How green is your city?

Sustainable Urban Metabolism: How green is your city? | green streets | Scoop.it

In the book, “Sustainable Urban Metabolism,” newly published by MIT Press, the authors set out a new program for doing something that has not yet been achieved: understanding just how many resources cities consume, and establishing, in effect, a holistic framework for producing an environmental balance sheet for every city. 

“The world needs to make a shift to become more sustainable,” says Ferrão, who is the director of the MIT-Portugal Program. “Cities are really the engines of growth, so whatever is going to happen in the world will happen in cities, particularly consumption of material resources.” Indeed, some organizations estimate that about half the world’s people now live in cities, a number likely to increase.

more...
Sharon McLean's curator insight, December 21, 2013 6:49 PM

Urban Sustainability

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

The Solar Strand: A New Cultural Landscape

The Solar Strand: A New Cultural Landscape | green streets | Scoop.it

In the interview with Robert G. Shibley, Domus investigates the process behind The Solar Strand, an innovative project designed by Walter Hood for the University at Buffalo campus.

The Solar Strand is sited among an extensive meadow regeneration area on UB’s North Campus. The mowing regimen, envisioned by Walter Hood and further developed with UB’s campus mowing crew, establishes a rhythm that continues from the Solar Strand and extends across the campus. In addition to a more efficient and sustainable approach to maintaining the campus landscape, the regimen has turned UB’s mowers into artists, designing as they cut...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Benchmarking the Walkability of Global Cities

Benchmarking the Walkability of Global Cities | green streets | Scoop.it

The world is becoming increasingly urban: by 2010 more than half the worlds population was living in an urban area and by 2050 that figure may rise to 70%. As these mega-cities become increasingly dense and over-populated, the transport systems that support them are struggling to cope. Cities around the world are realizing they will have to become walkable and bikeable in order to function in the future.

One global organisation is working to connect and empower governments, citizens and communities to achieve a walkable future. Walk21 is a non-profit with the vision to “create a world where people choose and are able to walk as a way to travel, to be healthy and to relax” and champions the International Charter for Walking, which prioritizes the following characteristics:

  • Inclusive Mobility
  • Integrated Networks
  • Less Crime
  • Promotion of Walking
  • Spaces for people
  • Spatial Planning
  • Supported Authorities
  • Reducing Road Danger

Find more information and links at the article...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

California's Unusual Plan to Cut Greenhouse Gases

California's Unusual Plan to Cut Greenhouse Gases | green streets | Scoop.it

The state is relying on cities to figure out how to cut emissions in their region. Will it work?


When California’s S.B. 375 was passed in 2008, there were many skeptics. The law aimed to get metropolitan regions around the state to cut greenhouse gas emissions through changes to development form and transportation. 

In 2011, the California Air Resources Board set GHG emissions reduction targets by metro region for passenger vehicles and 18 Metropolitan Planning Organizations were then to develop "sustainable community strategies," with integrated transportation, housing, and community development.

The idea was that smart, sustainable community design, coordinated with transportation systems that integrated walkability, bicycles, and next generation public transit, could really make a difference. It's honestly much too soon to tell whether this will work. But here's a quick look at three prominent metropolitan regions and their responses to this mandate.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

New designs to breathe life back into our cities

New designs to breathe life back into our cities | green streets | Scoop.it
Urban buildings use up precious materials and cause pollution. We need visionary thinking to create more sustainable designs that respond to their environment.


By the middle of this century, our cities are likely to be hotter, experience more dramatic changes in weather, be noisier and have an increasingly tenuous relationship with our natural world.

There’s a problem. Not only are cities responsible for 40% of our total carbon emissions, but they also deal with a limited set of physical conditions, and assume that our weather is going to be constant. Our buildings are designed for dryness and therefore deteriorate in the presence of water. Modern architecture is also designed to just house people, not other life forms, and therefore does not inherently promote biodiversity.

We therefore need to think about architecture very differently. We must search for new models for constructing buildings, as well as searching for improvements to our current industrial processes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Sustainable Development for Green Health City in Hainan

Sustainable Development for Green Health City in Hainan | green streets | Scoop.it

Green Health City is an ecologically sustainable development designed to support and promote the condition of physical and emotional human health. Situated in China’s Hainan Province in Boao Lecheng on the Wanquan River, five island districts bring together world-class medical facilities, employ new strategies for green energy production and rethink transportation networking to achieve a sustainable urban prototype.


Pathways toward a sustainable future are forged through strong ties to local identity and respect for history. By establishing a cross-disciplinary and inter-cultural approach to design that is routed in China’s long history, a comprehensive and well considered scheme is achieved.

more...
ParadigmGallery's comment, June 14, 2013 12:26 PM
I really like the story and the holistic approach. It seems like a very comprehensive prototype and the Eastern philosophy it incorporates is very interesting...
ParadigmGallery's curator insight, June 14, 2013 12:28 PM

A balanced prototype for cities of the future....

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Patch Dynamics: Urban Design and Ecology as MosaicCollective

Patch Dynamics: Urban Design and Ecology as MosaicCollective | green streets | Scoop.it

The urban ecology framework of Patch Dynamics has been key in watching how city models such as the megalopolis and the megacity interact and generate urban ecosystem change.


Urban Design practices have always been created in response to emerging and overlapping city models and the disciplinary contexts designers find themselves in. The urban ecology framework of Patch Dynamics has been key in allowing me to see how city models such as the megalopolis and the megacity interact and generate urban ecosystem change. One's first thought about a patch may be that of a shape that changes. However, the concept of a patch in this case describes a set of patches or a mosaic that changes over time. This search is not to find or create the best patch mosaics, or those that function in the most resilient ways.

Instead, it is a project of creating urban design practices and strategies for a diversity of urban actors to engage their patches and democratize the resilience cycle in their own ways.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

9 Essential Green Elements for the Development of Sustainable Cities

9 Essential Green Elements for the Development of Sustainable Cities | green streets | Scoop.it

Many cities are coming to the realization that creating a smart and sustainable city means ultimately attaining a high level of economic efficiency, a high quality of life, a highly desirable place in which to live and do business, and a meaningful commitment to environmental responsibility.

But what really makes for a green or sustainable city?  And how can sometimes highly diverse urban areas attain it?


LEED buildings and even LEED neighborhoods are surely a good thing, but they are not a sufficient thing to declare a municipality sustainable.  This is an overview of the essential elements (there are many more, but these are the most basic):

  • Committing to green
  • Building green
  • Buying green
  • Powering green
  • Conserving nearby (and creating internal) green landscapes
  • Protecting green:  both water quality and water quantity
  • Locating green:  creating a compact, walkable, interconnected, mixed-use community
  • Moving green:  diversifying transportation and increasing accessibility
  • (Not) wasting green:  getting to zero on the production of waste


Read the complete article for more on the green elements listed above...

more...
Noor Fatima's curator insight, April 12, 2013 1:05 PM

Exactly :)

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, April 12, 2013 7:12 PM

100% Green is not fooling around.

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

10 Ways to Improve High-Density Cities

10 Ways to Improve High-Density Cities | green streets | Scoop.it

Getting the right city density – generally expressed in the US as people per square mile or homes per acre – to support sustainable and pleasant living is one of the trickiest problems we face as we address the future of our communities. 

The typically low densities of suburban sprawl built in the last half of the 20th century, despite their popularity at the time with a considerable share of the market, have been shown by a voluminous body of research to produce unsustainable rates of driving, carbon emissions, pollution. stormwater runoff, and adverse health impacts. ..

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Creating a Sustainable Urban Landscape: Manama Urban Oasis by Aétrangère

Creating a Sustainable Urban Landscape: Manama Urban Oasis by Aétrangère | green streets | Scoop.it

Bab Al Bahrain Urban Oasis explores the value of the cultural and natural landscape inheritance as a design opportunity to address climate issues in public space, while catalyzing the urban potential of the site in the emerging new city urbanity.


Urban Oasis is considered to be the most important public space of Manama, embodying its dynamic character and showcasing its new sustainable identity.

An urban makeover is taking place at Bahrain and its capital, Manama. The city is evolving in the global economy as the financial hub of the Middle East, and witnessing a dramatic transformation of the urban fabric.

Urban Oasis represents its strategic position and historical importance, as an opportunity to create a lively metropolitan interface, able to link and gather both the historic urban fabric and the new modern city front.


The project is composed of layers evolving in a symbiotic and sustainable way. Responding to the climate, an urban canopy will provide shade, shelter, and comfort to the pedestrian areas below, offering an oasis from the stress of urban conditions. The public ground level, with its open spaces, water landscaping and main public pedestrian and car access, will host the principal cultural and urban facilities. 

The passively cooled terrace will provide an innovative urban place, lend a sense of fluidity to the open space and allow for great views of the waterfront, while a footbridge will create a continuous pedestrian pathway to the sea. Uses here would include cafes, small retail frontage, information points and restaurants.


Among the green areas proposed to reduce the ambient temperature while creating the new microclimate, ware numerous green features: Seven circular sunken gardens which will be showcased as world vegetal biomes, which will enhance local and foreign biodiversity. Those gardens of scents will be like glazed clusters, such a protected special areas...


Learn more about the project and see more photos and diagrams at the article link.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Eco Villa Concepts in Flavors Orchard, China by Vincent Callebaut Architecture

Eco Villa Concepts in Flavors Orchard, China by Vincent Callebaut Architecture | green streets | Scoop.it

Vincent Callebaut Architecture have designed a series of plus-energy villas for a self contained eco community in China. The Flavors Orchard project aims to encourage sustainable developments in China by showcasing the economic and environmental advantages of self sufficient buildings with efficient automated energy systems...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Eco-Friendly Architectural Projects Raising Awareness of Earth's Biomes

Eco-Friendly Architectural Projects Raising Awareness of Earth's Biomes | green streets | Scoop.it
The largest natural biome in the world is the maroon colored Taiga, a Russian word for forest, covering large parts of Canada, Europe and Asia with coniferous forests.

The term “Boreal” forest refers to the southern part of this biome and has heavier tree cover while the Taiga refers to the northern portion which is a mostly barren area that borders the Arctic treeline. In order to understand how biomes work, scientists and researchers have created projects like Biosphere and Eden.

The design refers to the integration of architectural structures into natural ecosystems, emphasizing a symbiotic relationship between buildings, landscapes, people and nature.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How Living Infrastructure Will Save Our Cities

How Living Infrastructure Will Save Our Cities | green streets | Scoop.it
Super-typhoon Haiyan, the single most powerful storm ever recorded, is an unsettling harbinger of troubles to come.


Weather systems across the globe have gained intensity and force over the past few years due to our rapidly warming planet. New defenses are needed to protect our metropolitan centers, most of which are located within a stone's throw of the ocean. The solution: fight nature with nature.

Supplementing civil engineering projects with ecological defenses is only part of the overall solution to dealing with our rapidly changing environment. Early warning systems, effective evacuation strategies, education, and better building codes must be integrated into the larger scheme of of sustainable city development and planning if we plan on living anywhere near our growing oceans...

more...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Phytoremediation: Healing Urban Landscapes through Plants

Phytoremediation: Healing Urban Landscapes through Plants | green streets | Scoop.it
Two graduate students present a concept for a former harbor site in north Amsterdam exploring the benefits of phytoremediation.


In the world of modern architecture everything has to be sustainable. If this means that we have to take care of nature and use our resources wisely then maybe phytoremediation can be considered a sustainable method of re-designing highly polluted areas.


Healing, remediating, cleaning, and purifying contaminated soil using plants to extract pollutants is the method of phytoremediation. It is getting attention lately, as it appears to be an effective low-cost and sustainable alternative when dealing with polluted soils. Interlaced into a good landscape design strategy it can save money, improve quality of urban spaces, and provides active and aesthetic uses of polluted areas until they are safe for other uses... 

more...
Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, September 22, 2013 2:51 PM

Maybe before 200 years we will figure out how to speed up the process.

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Designing For The Carpocalypse: 5 Ideas For A Pedestrian Freeway

Designing For The Carpocalypse: 5 Ideas For A Pedestrian Freeway | green streets | Scoop.it
Architects and students reimagine a San Francisco highway as a public space that reattaches a severed street grid.


One of the best places to see the San Francisco skyline is at the crest of Interstate 280. From a vehicle, it's a two-second vista, but designer Brian Vargo, for one, would like it prolonged. "What if that view could become a preserved—and celebrated—part of the city?" he writes. "Imagine giving that experience to a pedestrian rather than to a car."

Vargo envisions the last several blocks of 280 as a carless paradise for bicycle and foot traffic along the lines of New York's High Line. His proposal, the HighLink, is among the 5 winning entries of the Center for Architecture + Design and AIA San Francisco's 280 Freeway Competition

Launched in June, the contest invited architects and students to reimagine the highway site as a public space that reattaches a severed street grid. Find more information and entries at the article link.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from innovative design
Scoop.it!

London’s Largest “Living Wall”

London’s Largest “Living Wall” | green streets | Scoop.it

The Rubens at the Palace Hotel in Victoria, London, has unveiled the city’s largest “living wall” – a vertical landscape, composed of 16 tons of soil and 10,000 plants, designed to reduce urban flooding. Taking two months to construct and covering 350 square feet, the 21 meter high wall will beautify the cityscape year round with seasonal flowers such as strawberries, butter cups and winter geraniums.

This project is only one of many living rooftops and walls that London has been promoting to mitigate flooding, absorb rain and improve the appearance of buildings. These living surfaces are capable of improving the air quality in an area, deadening noise and helping to keep buildings cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. The vegetation can also trap microscopic pollutants which in high concentrations may cause respiratory illnesses.

more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, October 6, 2013 12:08 AM

Vertical landscaping

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Sprouting Eco-Cities: Sustainability Trend-Setters Or Gated Communities?

Sprouting Eco-Cities: Sustainability Trend-Setters Or Gated Communities? | green streets | Scoop.it

Not only are many cities bursting at the seams from urban overcrowding; they are also increasingly starting to bear the strains of climate change.

Although there are numerous solutions to either challenge, the building up of new "eco-cities" tries to kill the two birds with one stone. But what is the role of these master-planned communities in our sustainable futures?

The concept of an isolated, ecologically minded community is by no means a new one. The forward-thinking Buckminster Fuller was talking about "domed communities" in the 1960s, and in 1975 writer Ernest Callenbach published his novel Ecotopia, greatly influencing the green movements that would quickly follow.

While smaller versions may have grown more organically, contemporary Eco-Cities are often top-down master plans designed by big-name firms. Since many of these Eco-Cities are still under development, we can only speculate about their future performance and whether they will be flexible enough to function as a "real city."


Visit the link to read the complete article.

more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, August 12, 2013 1:43 PM

This article raises a good question.  It makes more sense to retrofit existing buildings so why not existing cities?

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Can Architects Solve Our Cities’ Pollution Problems?

Can Architects Solve Our Cities’ Pollution Problems? | green streets | Scoop.it

As populations continue to move to urban areas, architects must address how their designs will impact the cities they are trying to improve— and those inhabitants whose access to clean air is determined by their proposals. How can architects best use design to repair the health of our cities?


Visit the article link for project links and an overview of some of the innovative ways architecture addresses climate change, air quality, emissions and is rethinking our cities through design, technology and new approaches to sustainable urbanism...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

A Sustainable, Innovative Proposal for Taichung City Cultural Centre in Taiwan

A Sustainable, Innovative Proposal for Taichung City Cultural Centre in Taiwan | green streets | Scoop.it

The team of architects from Maxthreads Architectural Design & Planning designed the Taichung City Cultural Centre with the aim of combining nature and innovative technology.


The project defines the northern arrival gateway to Taichung Gateway Park, providing a public hub to the overall master plan. An iconic visual corridor connects the Transportation Centre to the main cultural district of the city through a vibrant pubic space, creating an unconventional and exceptional gathering space for visitors and inhabitants.

Maxthreads’ proposal introduces a strong relationship between the exterior and interior public spaces integrating into the Taichung Gateway Park. The Cultural Centre is designed in conjunction with Taichung Gateway park, and includes the integration of culture, education, tourism, environmental conservation, carbon reduction, energy conservation and sustainability.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Building a Sustainable U.S. Infrastructure: A Whole Systems Approach

Building a Sustainable U.S. Infrastructure: A Whole Systems Approach | green streets | Scoop.it

We need to take a whole systems approach to repairing and advancing our U.S. infrastructure.


An important, yet not yet widely adopted solution is the application of a whole systems approach—one that considers the interconnections between infrastructure projects and their surroundings, and that spans the entire lifecycle of infrastructure projects, from design and construction to operation and maintenance.  

Although this approach may involve upfront costs, this model can bolster efficiency, garner public support, and improve resiliency to natural disasters, resulting in significant short- and long-term payback. A whole systems approach should simultaneously address the needs of all stakeholders, and provide community, environmental, and economic benefits for all types of infrastructure projects, from pipelines to bridges to ports to airports...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

VetiVertical City: An Innovative & Sustainable Urban Solution for Shanghai

VetiVertical City:  An Innovative & Sustainable Urban Solution for Shanghai | green streets | Scoop.it

Shanghai is one of the Chinese cities with the highest levels of CO2 emissions per capital, and new material applications are being incorporated into architectural designs in order to address these urban issues. Vetiver is a tropical plant with uniquely structural, penetrating roots and the Vetiver System (VS) has been tested for slope stabilization, pollution control and water quality improvement.


The proposal for a new type of vertical city, featuring this sustainable technology, pursues dual objectives: first, the purification of wastewater produced by the building in order to recycle it and second, carbon dioxide reduction.

Achieving these goals is possible thanks to the combination between the properties of Vetiver with a new kind of skyscraper: VetiVertical City...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Towards A Sustainable Planet: Priorities
Scoop.it!

Hot in the City: Reducing Heat from Urban Waste

Hot in the City: Reducing Heat from Urban Waste | green streets | Scoop.it

Cities are hotbeds of sustainability, right? From urban agriculture to social enterprise, you’ll find lots of innovative approaches in urban centers, particularly those on the US coasts. Put a lot of people together in one place, and you generate a lot of ideas.


You also generate a lot of heat, it turns out: a new study in Nature Climate Change argues that urban centers (particularly on coasts) generate a lot of waste heat… and that heat is contributing to the weird weather patterns we’ve been seeing lately. This isn’t climate change (in the way we’ve conventionally considered it), nor is it the “urban heat island” effect. Rather, according to the research team that authored the study...


Via Susan Davis Cushing
more...
Gerry B's curator insight, February 11, 2013 12:58 AM

About time something should be done on exhausts coming from cities.