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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
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Protecting Ecosystems + Providing for A New Urban Community: Qunli Stormwater Wetland Park

Protecting Ecosystems + Providing for A New Urban Community: Qunli Stormwater Wetland Park | green streets | Scoop.it

From the architect. Turenscape was commissioned to design a wetland park of 34.2 hectares in the middle of a new town, which is listed as a protected regional wetland. The site is surrounded on four sides by roads and dense development. As such, water sources into this former wetland were being cut, and the wetland was under the threat. Turenscape’s strategy was to transform the dying wetland into a ‘green sponge’ – an urban stormwater park, which will not only rescue the disappearing wetland, but will also provide multiple ecosystems services for the new urban community.


The challenges are obvious: How can a disappearing wetland be preserved when its ecological and biological processes have been cut off by the urban context? How can such a wetland ecosystem be designed to provide multiple ecosystems for the city? And what is the economic way to deal with such a landscape? The solution was to transform the wetland into a multi-functional stormwater park that will collect, filtrate, store stormwater and infiltrate to the aquifer, whilst being productive and life supporting, providing new recreational and aesthetic experiences for the city.

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A New Initiative will improve NYC's Stormwater Management Infrastructure

A New Initiative will improve NYC's Stormwater Management Infrastructure | green streets | Scoop.it

A new initiative will improve New York City's stormwater management infrastructure.

Stormwater generally is an unpleasant topic in New York City- during extreme weather events, it floods sewers, causing them to overflow.

These sewer overflows are the city’s biggest water quality problem and a major reason that waterways such as Gowanas, Newtown Creek, and Flushing Bay do not meet federal standards for swimming and marine wild life habitats.

However, under a bold new green infrastructure plan that includes $2.9 billion in new gray infrastructure and $2.4 billion in green infrastructure that won approval from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation in March, the city is hoping to capture much of its stormwater with green roofs and blue roofs as well as new types of plant beds and tree pits along its streets called bioswales...

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LA Parking Lot becomes Urban Oasis

LA Parking Lot becomes Urban Oasis | green streets | Scoop.it

What’s the best place to build a wetland? How about at the site of an old MTA bus lot in South Los Angeles? It took more than $26 million and nearly three years to complete the transformation from parking lot to urban wetland. Open to the public as of February 9, the new South Los Angeles Wetland Park that doesn’t only efficiently process storm water runoff–it also provides crucial community green space.

As with many industrial environments, polluted storm water runs nearly unchecked to local water bodies, damaging habitats and freshwater supplies with the incursion of urban toxins. Before it was settled, South Los Angeles teemed with wildlife, oak forests, and dendritic streams feeding the Los Angeles River, but now that land has evolved into an impenetrable concrete cap. The new park will reactivate the area’s natural functions with storm water pools, deep cleaning retention basins, and banks of native plants chosen for their ability to clean water. The nine-acre site will also provide meandering boardwalks and promenades that traverse the wetland and create an urban oasis for an area of Los Angeles that sorely lacks green space.

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The Cost of Sprawl on Clean Water

The Cost of Sprawl on Clean Water | green streets | Scoop.it
The way we grow could have a major impact on water quality in the future.

Sustainable, smart growth and development is necessarily about location, form and function. Becoming greener doesn’t just mean a municipality’s adding a pleasant new park here and there, or planting more trees, although both components may be useful parts of a larger effort.

How a town is designed and developed is related to how well it functions, how well it functions is related to how sustainable it really is, and how sustainable it is, is directly related to how it affects its local waters and those who use those same waters downstream...

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New York City Commits to Green Solution for Harnessing Water

New York City Commits to Green Solution for Harnessing Water | green streets | Scoop.it
With a landmark announcement this week, New York City has officially joined a growing number of cities around the country in embracing a smarter--and paradigm-shifting--approach to reducing water pollution. Using a suite of techniques like strategically located street plantings, porous pavements, and green roofs, collectively known as green infrastructure, New York is turning the problem of excess stormwater into a solution that will improve the health and livability of its neighborhoods, while cleaning up the waterways that course through and around the city.

It's hard to overstate what a dramatic shift in thinking this represents. Instead of viewing stormwater as waste, New York is turning it into a resource. With this move, New York is showing the rest of the country that if the largest city in the U.S. can finally tackle its chronic water pollution problems with green infrastructure--they can, too.

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