green streets
Follow
Find tag "statistics"
34.6K views | +4 today
green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from green infographics
Scoop.it!

The Neighborhood Data Portal Every City Needs

The Neighborhood Data Portal Every City Needs | green streets | Scoop.it
Los Angeles rolls out interactive neighborhood health profiles covering everything from crime stats to obesity rates.

As the open data movement has matured, public city-wide vital stats have come to feel more like a citizen's right than a civic innovation. This is where things should head next: Take all of that data, map it, connect the dots between public health, land use, economics, education, crime and housing. And portray those patterns – and the inequality they often reveal – down to the neighborhood level.


Los Angeles has recently done just this, rolling out a web tool as part of its Plan for a Healthy Los Angeles that maps a tremendous number of metrics about life in the region, at both the city and neighborhood scales. Just a sampling of the dozens of metrics, via the portal from the L.A. Department of City Planning, the L.A. County Department of Public Health and The California Endowment:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Imagining a City Without Its Public Transportation

Imagining a City Without Its Public Transportation | green streets | Scoop.it
Antos, a WMATA transportation analyst, has for the last several months been managing a study [PDF] that makes the business case for transit in the D.C. area. The agency tried to isolate the actual impact of rail lines on economic development, property values and tax revenues in the immediate vicinity around each station (they conservatively estimate that Metrorail boosts the value of property within a half mile of stations by about seven to nine percent).

But they also modeled what the region would look like if its transit never existed. And this is where things get really interesting.

WMATA took the same transportation demand model that it uses to project ridership on a new line and instead ran a couple of scenarios with the region’s transit literally turned off. All of it: the regional rail, the buses and the metro system.

"It was literally just imagining Washington, and all of a sudden, you wake up tomorrow, and the transit system isn’t there," Antos says. "What would you do?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

America's Most Diverse Neighborhoods

America's Most Diverse Neighborhoods | green streets | Scoop.it

Which neighborhoods best reflect American diversity?


To answer this question, the country’s most diverse neighborhoods and metros were identified using Census data on race and ethnicity and diversity was measured as the share of a metro area’s or ZIP code’s population in its largest racial or ethnic group: the smaller the share of the largest group, the more diverse the neighborhood is...

With maps, charts and statistics, the analysis provides an interesting look at the diversity of communities and counties across the country, with it being highest in California and Hawaii, and much of the South.


Learn more about diversity in America's communities at the article link...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Smart growth investment may be key to small cities' economic vitality

Smart growth investment may be key to small cities' economic vitality | green streets | Scoop.it

This recent report from the Center for Neighborhood Technology looks very interesting. Among other things, it seems to confirm exactly what Chuck Marohn (Community Growth Institute, Strong Towns) has been telling us about the economic imperatives facing smaller cities and towns in Heartland America: to become resilient, prioritize investment in smart growth and efficient transportation.

more...
No comment yet.