green streets
Follow
Find tag "skyline"
29.9K views | +19 today
green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Next-generation high-rises offer glimpses of our urban skyline future

Next-generation high-rises offer glimpses of our urban skyline future | green streets | Scoop.it
The world's cities are sprouting with plans for new towers and skyscrapers, a sign of twin booms in creativity and wealth.

When London has 250 new skyscrapers planned and building departments in cities from New York to Abuja, Nigeria, are bursting at the seams for new tower permits. The new designs display greater technological prowess, unimaginable beauty and true innovation in how people will live in tomorrow's intelligent, dense, high-rise world...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How LEDs Will Make Or Break The Skylines Of Global Cities

How LEDs Will Make Or Break The Skylines Of Global Cities | green streets | Scoop.it

LED lighting is transforming skylines all over the world—and architects, city governments, and urban denizens should take note. These illuminated nightscapes promise a new worldwide arena where global cities will compete for recognition.


It's a gradual trend that has reached a fever pitch in recent months. Recent articles from the New York Times and NY1 discuss the LED-ification of two of New York City's landmark skyscrapers: the Empire State Building and the Helmsley Building. Why the intensifying deployment of these powerful lighting systems? Well, for starters, LEDs (light-emitting diodes) are energy-efficient, long-lasting, increasingly affordable, and easily controlled by computer programs. Architecturally, these little lights can significantly change a building's nighttime character, transforming shadowy forms into immaculate performances of infinite color and vivacity...

more...
ParadigmGallery's comment, August 2, 2013 1:44 PM
I grew up in the "lighting industry" so I was particularly interested in this story. The absolut best part of it is the comments/interaction...Duilio Passariello and Zachary Edelson the author...
Linus Ridge's comment, August 15, 2013 3:41 AM
A really interesting article.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

What Your Skyline Says About Your City

What Your Skyline Says About Your City | green streets | Scoop.it
The physical space reveals something deeper about a place.

Found in places like Vancouver, Sao Paulo, and Buenos Aires, this is the kind of skyline that gets urbanists giddy. These cities feature high-density cores with 24/7 activity, and residents rarely leave the urban core. Commenters have noted that Vancouver’s residential centralization policies may have actually worked too well, crowding out the middle-class, as the district’s desirability has pushed prices sky-high. Nevertheless, the city consistently ranks near the top of global Quality of Life surveys, as high-density living translates to good public transit and easy access to parks and other recreational opportunities.

Read the complete article to learn more about ten distinct “Skyline Types” that characterize a great number of the world’s great (and not-so-great) cities...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

London's future skyline captured in new visualiations

London's future skyline captured in new visualiations | green streets | Scoop.it

This series of images by architectural rendering studio Hayes Davidson envisages how London's skyline might look in 20 years time.

Over 200 towers with a height of 20 storeys or greater are planned in the UK capital over the next two decades and Hayes Davidson has visualised how these new buildings will appear alongside existing skyscrapers such as Renzo Piano's The Shard and Norman Foster's The Gherkin.


The images were created for an exhibition opening later this year at New London Architecture (NLA) entitled London's Growing... Up! which will chart the growth of tall building construction in London since the 1960s and look at the impact skyscrapers will have on the city in the near future.

"As London's population gets bigger and bigger, and new development for London takes place within the constraints of the green belt, we have to increase the density of the city," said Peter Murray, who is chairman of NLA and the exhibition curator.

more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, January 25, 9:30 AM

Future city planners and developers will be using some amazing tools.

Christina Guenther's curator insight, February 10, 9:24 PM

I have never been to London but their future is looking very attractive. 

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

3rd Grand Central Terminal proposal includes a 'podium park' and skyscraper

3rd Grand Central Terminal proposal includes a 'podium park' and skyscraper | green streets | Scoop.it

WXY Architecture have suggested a skyscraper and a network of elevated cycling paths for the future of New York's Grand Central Terminal.


Alongside other firms Foster + Parters and SOM, the architects were invited by the Municipal Art Society of New York to look at the public spaces in and around the 100-year-old station then come up with a strategy for the future.

Like Foster + Partners, WXY Architecture proposes the pedestrian station of Vanderbilt Avenue, above which an elevated deck would surround the base of the 250-metre-high MetLife Building. The architects refer to this deck as a “podium park”, which would feature transparent glass paving and seasonal plants, plus routes for cyclists and pedestrians and spaces to pause for reflection.


“The plan for Midtown’s near future needs to make the Grand Central neighbourhood a place people enjoy being in not just running through,” said WXY’s Claire Weisz.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

The sustainable city: Public transit isn't just for tree-huggers

The sustainable city: Public transit isn't just for tree-huggers | green streets | Scoop.it

The most dynamic skyline in the world won't create a sustainable city. Only a population that enjoys physical, social, political, and economic health — resources that functioning cities are uniquely positioned to deliver — can do that.

Of course, no single solution will achieve this unilaterally. A city with thriving, educated residents is produced by a combination of various civil and social services and infrastructure — including an established and expanding mass transit system.

Why is transit so important? Simply put, it provides access to the city's aforementioned resources for everyone, regardless of economic or social status. Transit helps bridge the ever-growing gap between those who can afford cars (or other private modes of transportation) and those who cannot...

more...
No comment yet.