green streets
Follow
Find tag "seattle"
34.4K views | +2 today
green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Seattle's New Streetlights Are 40-Foot-Tall Singing Flowers

Seattle's New Streetlights Are 40-Foot-Tall Singing Flowers | green streets | Scoop.it
The immense plants live under the Space Needle and blast anybody passing underneath with a harmony of voices.


Under the Space Needle, 40-foot-tall flowers acting both as lamps and troubadours that croon when people get near. The Pacific Science Center commissioned this trippy artwork for its novel design and use of solar electricity – the petals of each "flower" are studded with photovoltaic cells that allow them to shimmer in vibrant hues.

more...
Laura Brown's comment, August 27, 2013 8:22 PM
They'll look like an alien invasion in winter.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

praud: urban intervention for seattle center

praud: urban intervention for seattle center | green streets | Scoop.it
floating above the parkscape, this large balloon serves as a screen to announce events while interacting with visitors, altering states with the continuously changing atmospheric conditions.

Boston-based practice praud has proposed the 'seattle jelly bean' as an urban intervention for seattle center in washington, USA. Hearkening back to the old days, a large balloon hovers above the parkscape to serve as a beacon to announce events to the public. Doubling as a projection screen, the element interacts with visitors by altering states with the continuously changing atmospheric conditions or by demand of visitors. the floating object produces a microclimate ranging from fog, sunshine, clouds and rain. The paths of the park below are generated from entry points which address the general city grid, creating a topography of solids and voids. Varied heights allow for different types of functions and fields generating different experiences

for pedestrians and joggers...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Getting Greener: Seattle's eco-district nearing reality

Getting Greener: Seattle's eco-district nearing reality | green streets | Scoop.it
Attempting to better integrate the green agenda into local planning, the Bullitt Foundation, a Seattle nonprofit focusing on sustainability, awarded $50,000 last spring to the city’s Capitol Hill Housing Foundation to conduct a feasibility study for a neighborhood “eco-district.”

The foundation hired local firm GGLO to complete the study, and the firm last month began providing recommendations, including increased affordable housing, a community orchard, and a storm-water management system.

As Capitol Hill Housing Sustainable Communities manager Alex Brennan explained, the district planning unites neighborhood infrastructure and building design, considering energy, water, materials, transportation, and habitat. Proponents consider it a more unified alternative to LEED for neighborhood development.

“We see Capitol Hill as a catalyst for this type of planning, as the densest community in the northwest,” noted Chris Persons, executive director of Capitol Hill Housing...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Low-Hanging Fruit: Can an Edible Forest Take Root in Seattle? - Environment - GOOD

Low-Hanging Fruit: Can an Edible Forest Take Root in Seattle? - Environment - GOOD | green streets | Scoop.it
Imagine if your neighborhood park doubled as a communal orchard. Out of fruit in the fridge? Just stroll down the block and pluck the first ripe pear you see. It may sound like a hippie fantasy, but residents of Seattle's Beacon Hill neighborhood could soon be living that dream, with a community group planning to break ground on the country's largest "food forest" this summer.

According to longtime Beacon Hill resident Glenn Herlihy, the working-class neighborhood is sparse on public green space, despite having acres of grassland spread out around around a long-defunct reservoir. While taking a class on permaculture—the agricultural philosophy that mimics the dynamics of a natural ecosystem—Herlihy and collaborators used their final project to come up with a plan to "to regenerate this land back into something edible and natural."

The result was what Herlihy calls a "dream design." "There were no boundaries here, we just kind of went nuts and designed the most sustainable beautiful garden we could think of," he says. The plan created the groundwork for the formation of a community group, outreach efforts to neighbors and local bureaucracy, and, eventually, grants from the city. Now Friends of the Beacon Hill Food Forest is working with a landscape architect and volunteers to plan and execute the project...

more...
No comment yet.