Urban Agriculture Isn’t New | green streets | Scoop.it

In fact, it’s been around since 3,500 BC when Mesopotamian farmers began setting aside plots in their growing cities.

In a review of urban agriculture throughout modern history at a symposium at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C., a diverse set of academics and designers ranging from historians to landscape architects discussed how the practice has evolved over the ages, often been highly ideological, and continues to be loaded with historical, cultural, and social meaning.

 

Organized by professor Dorothee Imbert, ASLA, chair of the master’s of landscape architecture program at Washington University, the conference looked at why urban agriculture is such a hot topic among the public and designers now but also hoped to put the current interest in a broader context.

As Imbert said, “the inter-relationship between food and the city has a long history.”