green streets
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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Brooklyn's New Lab: The Future of Urban Manufacturing in NYC

Brooklyn's New Lab: The Future of Urban Manufacturing in NYC | green streets | Scoop.it

The future of urban manufacturing is alive in New York City—specifically (and unsurprisingly) in Brooklyn. This month, in the historic Brooklyn Navy Yard, Macro Sea‘s 'New Lab' opened its Beta Space, a place that gives NY-based entrepreneurs, innovators, designers and engineers an opportunity to launch their businesses and create jobs.


New Lab is a first-of-its-kind advanced manufacturing hub in the Navy Yard’s 220,000-sq-ft Green Manufacturing Center that fosters innovation in design, prototyping, and new manufacturing, ushering in a new era of local production...

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Luiz F. Costa's comment, May 25, 2013 9:16 AM
Genial esta iniciativa.
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Detroit: rejuvenation through urban farms, sustainable living & innovation

Detroit: rejuvenation through urban farms, sustainable living & innovation | green streets | Scoop.it

The wide open spaces now prevalent throughout Detroit have given residents an opportunity to reconnect with their food. With supermarkets almost non-existent and drugstores selling mostly processed food (or fresh food imported from South America), civil organisations such as Earthworks are teaching local people everything about growing fruits and vegetables, including planting, harvesting, composting and canning.

"It's not just about surviving," said Shane Bernardo, outreach co-ordinator for Earthworks, the organisation that has led Detroit's urban farming movement. "It's about economic justice, and in the long run, economic resilience."

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What Makes Some Cities Greener Than Others

What Makes Some Cities Greener Than Others | green streets | Scoop.it
Today I turn my attention to the economic, demographic, and other factors associated with cities and metros that have lower levels of carbon emissions.

 

Several Martin Prosperity Institute colleagues and I [Richard Florida] took a simple, straightforward statistical look at several things research and common sense suggest should be associated with higher and lower levels of carbon emissions.

We measure emissions three ways, as a function of population (per capita), workforce (per worker), and economic output (per economic output). All the caveats regarding correlation not being causation apply. However, our findings underscore the fact that carbon emissions are linked as much to the way we live as how we produce and manufacture things...


Via Flora Moon
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