green streets
Follow
Find tag "garden"
30.7K views | +5 today
green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Community Solar Gardens Bring Affordable Green Energy to the Masses

Community Solar Gardens Bring Affordable Green Energy to the Masses | green streets | Scoop.it

A new trend is springing up across the country that’s making affordable solar energy increasingly available to the masses.

Community solar gardens allow customers who aren’t able to establish their own solar power systems to buy into a solar array built elsewhere and get a credit on their electricity bill for the power produced by the panels. These arrangements that allow people to not only cut their power bills but also switch to more green energy first emerged in Colorado, but have since spread across the country – with laws allowing the projects to progress through legislatures in California, Minnesota and Washington D.C., and one on the books since 2008 in Massachusetts – where the trend is currently taking flight...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Botanic garden in Australia wins World Landscape of the Year 2013

Botanic garden in Australia wins World Landscape of the Year 2013 | green streets | Scoop.it
This year's award for the best landscape project at the World Architecture Festival has gone to a botanical garden at a former quarry in Australia, situated in a former sand quarry outside Melbourne. 
The garden is laid out as a journey through Australian fauna, from the desert to the coast, set among buildings and beside artificial lakes, and showcases170,000 plants across 1700 species, and is used by both researchers and the public.
"This garden brilliantly summarises the great variety of Australian flora as well as the large part of the country which is arid desert," said the panel of judges. "Like a botanic garden, it is a collection of difference, but with a strong unifying set of journeys through the various landscapes.

See more images at the link.
more...
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Inspired By Design
Scoop.it!

The Garden of Forking Paths by Beals & Lyon Architects

The Garden of Forking Paths by Beals & Lyon Architects | green streets | Scoop.it

The Garden of Forking Paths’ by Chilean firm Beals & Lyon Architects constructs a green maze, which creates an environment of slowness and a new scale for leisure and the unforeseen in a park that is otherwise insistently being pushed and transformed into a productive and lucrative space.


Visitors ideally relinquish orientation, leaving the rush of the city behind. This quietness will eventually allow a change in perception: slow, paused, useless, thus establishing a connection with their bodies through an unexpected sensual experience and could bring a whole new understanding of space, capable of locating the body, back at the centre of architecture.


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

The Impact of Urban Farming in New York

The Impact of Urban Farming in New York | green streets | Scoop.it

Urban farming is a sustainability movement that is giving new purpose to rooftops, patios and unused space. The beauty of urban farming is that it not only produces an abundance of organic, locally grown food, but also has a social, economic and communal impact.


Urban farming has the potential to become a global green evolution, improving the economy, sustainability and health of our urban communities. From North Minneapolis and Milwaukee to Cairo and Montreal, urban farms and gardens are sprouting up as a solution to maximize the use of natural resources such as solar energy, advocating healthy lifestyles and even teaching job skills. 

From rooftop-grown organic herbs to brownstone backyard tomato plants, urban farming is creating green utopias in otherwise unused or abandoned metropolitan spaces.


Read further for more information on urban farming as an agricultural revolution, aiding the change of global urban landscapes.

more...
Katie Elizabeth's curator insight, August 8, 2013 1:20 PM

Cultural landscapes in our cities are changing.  What's your opinion?

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

The New Era of Urban Agriculture | Sustainable Cities Collective

The New Era of Urban Agriculture | Sustainable Cities Collective | green streets | Scoop.it

A flux of design proposals has emerged over the last few years that respond to the increasing interest in food security and sustainability.

While cities have historically provided productive spaces for growing food out of necessity, the proposals in Carrot City represent an effort to think more coherently and strategically about food production. They show how urban agriculture can become infrastructure for re-integrating food production into the urban fabric in meaningful ways, eventually becoming, as the authors argue, as imperative to a city’s functioning as public sanitation systems...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Can we make nature even better?

Can we make nature even better? | green streets | Scoop.it
A new book from Emma Marris reexamines traditional views of wilderness, asserting that human influence over nature is undeniable, and that instead of fighting it, we should figure out how to use it for good.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Edible Schoolyard NYC: An Organic Garden in Brooklyn

Edible Schoolyard NYC: An Organic Garden in Brooklyn | green streets | Scoop.it

WORKac and Edible Schoolyard NYC transformed a half-acre of the existing parking lot of the Arturo Toscanini School in Gravesend, Brooklyn, into a thriving organic garden.

To ensure a true four-seasons garden experience for the students, WORKac incorporated a greenhouse together with the indoor kitchen classroom. The building is composed of three major components, each of which is articulated through the use of different materials: the greenhouse is a polycarbonate and aluminum structure; the steel-framed kitchen classroom is clad in a pixilated pattern of colored shingles; and a “Systems Wall” at the rear is articulated as a series of playful volumes covered in a bright blue rubber coating.


More details at the link...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Australia's Largest Botanic Garden: Biodiversity and Sustainability in the Public Realm

Australia's Largest Botanic Garden: Biodiversity and Sustainability in the Public Realm | green streets | Scoop.it

In a former sand quarry, a new botanic garden has been completed, one that allows visitors to follow a metaphorical journey of water through the Australian landscape, from the desert to the coastal fringe.

Via the artistry of landscape architecture, this integrated landscape brings together horticulture, architecture, ecology, and art to create the largest botanic garden devoted to Australian flora. It seeks, through the design of themed experiences, to inspire visitors to see our plants in new ways.

The project's completion comes at a time when Botanic Gardens world-wide are questioning existing research and recreational paradigms to address landscape conservation and a renewed interest in meaningful visitor engagement...

more...
Pedro Barbosa's comment, September 11, 2013 10:23 AM
Lauren, please contact me on pbarbosa@gmail.com regarding this issue.
Bridgett and Sheila 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:29 AM

This botanical garden shows the landscape of Australia and how they have managed to bring all the plant life throughout Australia into it whether or not they really grow there. This is a form off art and inventions because they have found a way to bring it all in together and give people a nice tour through a small scale Australia. 

Jemma Tanner's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:35 AM

The reason I decided to scoop this this article was because it involves learning areas to do with Australia's landscape as well as gives the opportunity for students to practically and rationally design a solution to a problem. For example, you could pose a problem environment to the class in which they have to fix within certain restrictions. This could be lowered for younger levels by choosing one area of focus.

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

6 Examples of Urban Gardens, from Paris to Mexico City

6 Examples of Urban Gardens, from Paris to Mexico City | green streets | Scoop.it

In honor of the opening of a new garden in Paris, Reuters has pulled together a list of some of their favorite green spaces.

Here are a couple favorites...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How to Start an Urban Farm in a Post-Industrial City

How to Start an Urban Farm in a Post-Industrial City | green streets | Scoop.it
Youngstown, Ohio, may have shrunk, but its urban farms are growing.

In its manufacturing heyday, its population topped 170,000. Now less than half that number live in the city. The 73,000 or so inhabitants live among 22,000 vacant lots and buildings.

But rather than sit around and watch the grass grow in vacant lots, the citizens and leaders of Youngstown have decided to take control of what grows there.

By 2010, the city had put together a plan that envisioned a future as a smaller city, but also a greener one. That foresight is paying off. The city’s website lists its recent accolades—fourth best city for raising a family, one of 20 cities recovering most strongly from the Great Recession, most affordable major housing market. And instead of growing grass in vacant lots, a bevy of community groups are growing vegetables and fruits, alongside chicken coops and fish ponds, as Global Green documents in a new report.

Part of the city’s plan has been to support urban agriculture by leasing or selling land parcels for as little as a dollar and by handing out wrenches to allow farmers access to water from fire hydrants when their rainwater collection systems run dry...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

No vacancy: Unleashing the potential of empty urban land

No vacancy: Unleashing the potential of empty urban land | green streets | Scoop.it

A group of volunteers in Brooklyn mapped all the vacant city-owned properties in the borough, and discovered a remarkable amount of unused real estate...

Less than a year old, 596 Acres is the work of a small core of volunteers, including Paula Z. Segal, a lawyer and lead facilitator for the group. Segal first got interested in the city-owned vacant lots because of a site known as Myrtle Village Green, near where she lived at the time.

Researching the site, Segal learned how much data was available on vacant city land that had not yet been locked down by developers — and she got excited about the potential uses for that space. She presented some of her findings at the Festival of Ideas for the New City last year, and that’s where she met Eric Breisford, a programmer who, like her, is involved in a variety of other projects having to do with access to public space, public data, and decent food. The duo quickly got to work on making the data more accessible in both digital and paper formats.

Together they worked to get a map printed that showed the data they had gathered, and an online version as well. They researched a few lots in greater detail, then wheatpasted the printed maps to foam core boards along with explanations of “what’s going on here,” and posted those at a few lots around Brooklyn...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Urban Design for the People by the People

Urban Design for the People by the People | green streets | Scoop.it
A look at different Grass Roots DIY Urban Development projects around the US. Urban Gardens, citizen installed benches and furniture, art and more.
more...
No comment yet.