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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
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Team provide winning proposal for new Copenhagen bridge

Team provide winning proposal for new Copenhagen bridge | green streets | Scoop.it

WilkinsonEyre, BuroHappold Engineering and architectural practice Urban Agency have teamed to create the new Copenhagen inner harbour bridge.

The design will link the two misaligned axes of Vester Voldgade and Langebrogade in a graceful curvature. This process will be able to reconnect the city to the walls of Christianshavn, allowing for better use of the space. The bridge will gradually raise leading into the middle, before sloping down again to reach the alternate side, making it easy to use for pedestrians and cyclists. Two opening spans at the centre of the bridge will be able to pivot and open, creating a 35m wide shipping channel...

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Copenhagen's 'Bicycle Snake': Aiming to Become the Best Cycling City in The World

Copenhagen's 'Bicycle Snake': Aiming to Become the Best Cycling City in The World | green streets | Scoop.it

The Ambitious Cykelslangen by DISSING+WEITLING enables Copenhagen's vision to become the best cycling city in the world by the end of 2015.

The 235-meter-long orange snake meanders 5.5 meters high above sea level from Havneholmen through the mall Fisketorvet, ending at Kalvebod Brygge. This “snake” is actually a ramp and a bridge, called the “Cykelslangen — The Bicycle Snake,” that provides more than 12,000 bicyclists with a safe route through this busy district every day.

The architecture firm DISSING+WEITLING was asked to design a ramp to replace a nearby staircase. Instead of just designing a simple ramp, they went a step further and designed a bridge. The result is a destination and focal point that can be seen for miles from the air and has also completely transformed the area for all who enjoy it.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 17, 2014 8:08 PM

Option : Urban change and management

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Tackling climate change: Copenhagen's sustainable city design

Tackling climate change: Copenhagen's sustainable city design | green streets | Scoop.it

Global warming poses a real threat to cities, but planners in the Danish capital are taking visionary steps to ensure its resilience – and success – as far ahead as 2100.


Visualise the world in 2050: convex streets that collect water from superstorms and pocket parks that absorb heat and can be turned into reservoirs. Welcome to Copenhagen, where planners are preparing the city for the effects of climate change several generations from now...

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Bjarke Ingels designs a new public park in Copenhagen that celebrates diversity

Bjarke Ingels designs a new public park in Copenhagen that celebrates diversity | green streets | Scoop.it

Superkilen is a new urban park that cuts through the heart of Copenhagen’s diverse Nørrebro neighborhood.

The kilometer-long “Super Park”, which consists of three themed parts–is dotted with various pop artifacts and cultural mementos “sourced” from the home countries of the area’s inhabitants. Here, you’re just as likely to stumble across manhole covers from Paris and Islamic tiled fountains from Morocco as you are (ironic) neon Communist signage from Moscow and curvy benches from Brazil.

Designed in collaboration with art group Superflex and Topotek 1 architects, BIG conceived of the park as a “fusion of architecture, landscape, and art”. The team was invited to participate in the 13.4 million euro project, which aims to revitalize the neighborhood while forging a global identity capable of unifying the city’s urban fabric.


View more images and read about how the designers were able to achieve a “maximum freedom of expression”, which, according to Bjarke Ingels, transforms “public procedure into proactive proposition we curated a park for the people by the people.”

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In New Copenhagen Suburbs, Aim Is Sustainable Living

In New Copenhagen Suburbs, Aim Is Sustainable Living | green streets | Scoop.it
Hard times or not, two urban development projects — from two centuries — plow ahead.

How does a city expand and, at the same time, reduce car use and emissions? Officials in Copenhagen believe part of the answer is to build and extend a modern mass transit network while trying to eliminate the need for commuting altogether.

Copenhagen, with a population of 1.2 million in the city and its suburbs, will need to find homes for a projected 100,000 new residents by the year 2025.

Fortunately, the city still has room to grow.

In 2001, the first building in a new master-planned suburb called Orestad, south of downtown and named for the Oresund, the channel separating eastern Denmark from Sweden, was completed. Work on preparing a second major site, Nordhavn, in the docks north of the city, has just begun on land freed up by the departure of heavy industry...

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What Copenhagen can teach us about cycling

What Copenhagen can teach us about cycling | green streets | Scoop.it

From ‘green wave’ traffic lights and majestic harbour bike bridges to digital countdowns and foot rests at junctions, the Danish capital is full of clever ideas to improve city cycling...


Via Bentejui Hernández Acosta
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Trylletromler: An Innovative, Accessible Pavilion in Copenhagen

Trylletromler: An Innovative, Accessible Pavilion in Copenhagen | green streets | Scoop.it

Trylletromler’ is the Danish word for the zoetrope, a 19th century device that activates an impression of movement within a still image. The Renaissance garden of Rosenborg Castle, Copenhagen, forms the context for a new pavilion that is accessible to all public, innovative in its spatial expression and is challenging by its idiom.


FABRIC therefore introduced a new spatial concept by stretching the understanding of the ‘pavilion’ towards the most elementary architectural element in garden design: the fence.

The fence is made out of three thousand standard pieces of Nordic timber, which are joined using an irregular pattern of wedges. Based on these three principles an intriguing floor plan was designed using a composition of ten perfect circles..

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European cities promote cycling with everything from ‘superhighways’ to revolving bike racks

European cities promote cycling with everything from ‘superhighways’ to revolving bike racks | green streets | Scoop.it

Cycling through the heart of some European cities can be a terrifying experience as you jostle for space with cars, trucks and scooters that whizz by with only inches to spare. Thankfully for bicycle enthusiasts, a movement is afoot to create more room for cycling in the urban infrastructure.

From London’s “cycle superhighways” to popular bike-sharing programs in Paris and Barcelona, growing numbers of European cities are embracing cycling as a safe, clean, healthy, inexpensive and even trendy way to get around town.

Amsterdam and Copenhagen are pioneers of this movement and serve as role models for other cities considering cycling’s potential to reduce congestion and pollution, while contributing to public health.

The trend is catching on also outside Europe, says John Pucher, a professor of urban planning at Rutgers University in New Jersey and co-author of a new book titled “City Cycling.”

Pucher says urban cycling is on the rise across the industrialized world, though Europe is still ahead of the pack.


Read the complete article for further details on urban cycling, cycle 'superhighways', bike sharing programs, two-wheel parking, mixed-mode commuting and more...

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In Copenhagen, A Neighborhood Keeps Pace With Climate Change...

In Copenhagen, A Neighborhood Keeps Pace With Climate Change... | green streets | Scoop.it
All over, it seems, architects are thinking about how to plan for the realities of climate change. Some designers have risen to that challenge by imagining how conventional forms of architecture might become more adaptive and resilient in the face of high water, as in the Skygrove high-rise concept design by HWKN Architects of New York. Other architects, such as those at the Dutch firm Waterstudio.NL, have embraced the Netherlands’ long history of building barriers to hold back rising water for development in recent years by turning their attention to buildings that float, particularly in the nearly sea-level island nation of The Maldives.

But rising sea levels aren’t the only threats posed by climate change. ArchDaily reports that the Copenhagen-based architecture firm Tredje Natur recently presented plans to develop Saint Kjeld’s Quarter into Copenhagen’s greenest (and most resilient) neighborhood by planning for extreme weather events. This comprehensive urban development project is a case-study in planning for rain — lots of it. In this plan, rainwater is managed in the city’s streets in a more natural and effective way via wide range of pragmatic strategies. A key feature here: 20 percent of the neighborhood’s surface area devoted to streets will be reclaimed, creating more green spaces...

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Copenhagen: A city of SUV cyclists

Copenhagen: A city of SUV cyclists | green streets | Scoop.it

Copenhagen boasts that more than 36 percent of people commuting in to the city, and 55 percent of all Copenhagen residents, cycle to their place of work or education every day via 350 kilometers (217 miles) of bike lanes, and 40 kilometers (25 miles) of bike paths, according to Danish government statistics.
Those statistics seemed completely implausible to me for a country where intermittent downpours are the norm for summer, as is snow in the wintertime--until I traveled to Copenhagen and realized two things: first, many residents are not just bicyclists--they also ride tricycles well equipped to carry people and gear. Second, they often ride on cycle tracks delineated by curbs, not bike lanes by U.S. standards.


Via J. Campbell
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