green streets
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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
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The Closest Look Yet at the Relative Energy Efficiency of Big Buildings

The Closest Look Yet at the Relative Energy Efficiency of Big Buildings | green streets | Scoop.it

New York City's largest buildings have as outsized a place in the city's energy use profile as they do in the skyline. Just 2% of New York's properties account for 48% of the city's energy use. 

What's a city to do? The Bloomberg administration is doing what it does best: crunching massive amounts of data. On Wednesday, the mayor released the city's second annual benchmarking report, which analyzes the year-to-year energy and water use of New York's 26,680 largest buildings. 

"It's the first time we've had access to this comparative information," says Melissa Wright, an associate director of the Natural Resources Defense Council’s City Energy Project who has worked in the Bloomberg administration. "For so long it was this hidden information about what the real energy performance was of a set of buildings or individual buildings."

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Squeezing into the Urban Fold...

Squeezing into the Urban Fold... | green streets | Scoop.it

City living is expensive. There is a distinct premium that comes with living in central zones and, with increasing numbers of home buyers willing to pay these costs, the higher they soar.

 

The density crunch in a number of major cities is making for some interesting design solutions in which homeowners literally have to squeeze into the urban landscape.

The owners of a small block in the inner city hub of Surry Hills Sydney faced just such a problem. With the high cost of living in such a dense city, home owners bought a seven-by-six metre block in the midst of the hustle and bustle and recruited architect Domenic Alvaro to develop the widely critically and publicly acclaimed Small House.

Not only does this kind of living cut off the city commute, it avoids the highly dreaded urban sprawl even when populations balloon...

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Seeing cities as the environmental solution, not the problem

Seeing cities as the environmental solution, not the problem | green streets | Scoop.it
The best way to save wilderness is through strong, compact, beautiful communities that are more, not less, urban and do not encroach on places of significant natural value.
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Steven Holl Completes “Micro-City” Complex In Chengdu, China

Steven Holl Completes “Micro-City” Complex In Chengdu, China | green streets | Scoop.it

Steven Holl has completed his latest, and some might say, most significant project in China. The Sliced Porosity Block, or “CapitaLand Raffles City Chengdu” was recently opened, ushering in a new type of architecture for one of China’s fastest growing cities.


Located in the heart of Chengdu, the dense three million square-foot complex creates a completely novel public space that’s hemmed in by five residential/office towers. The scheme, which flips the generic tower-and-podium typology on its head, differentiates itself from other nearby urban projects by privileging public space over exuberant form and material-wasting showmanship...

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, January 18, 2013 3:56 PM

Steven Holl is an architect who's work we greatly admire. We appreciate our friend Lauren Moss for bringing this project to our attention.

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The sustainable city: Public transit isn't just for tree-huggers

The sustainable city: Public transit isn't just for tree-huggers | green streets | Scoop.it

The most dynamic skyline in the world won't create a sustainable city. Only a population that enjoys physical, social, political, and economic health — resources that functioning cities are uniquely positioned to deliver — can do that.

Of course, no single solution will achieve this unilaterally. A city with thriving, educated residents is produced by a combination of various civil and social services and infrastructure — including an established and expanding mass transit system.

Why is transit so important? Simply put, it provides access to the city's aforementioned resources for everyone, regardless of economic or social status. Transit helps bridge the ever-growing gap between those who can afford cars (or other private modes of transportation) and those who cannot...

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