green streets
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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
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A New Bike Lane That Could Save Lives and Make Cycling More Popular

A New Bike Lane That Could Save Lives and Make Cycling More Popular | green streets | Scoop.it

Nick Falbo is proposing a new protected intersection design that would make intersections safer and less stressful than they are today.

In the past few years, U.S. cities have come a long way to make sure bicyclists are safe on the road, but even protected bike lanes have an achilles heel: the intersection. Most protected bike lanes—lanes that have a physical barrier between bicyclists and drivers—end just before the intersection, leaving bicyclists and pedestrians vulnerable to turning vehicles. Nick Falbo, an urban planner and designer from Portland (one of the most bike friendly cities in the nation), is proposing a new protected intersection design that would make intersections safer and less stressful than they are today. Falbo’s design is taken from the Dutch way of doing things. The bike community has already been building protected intersections into their bike lanes for years. Falbo’s adapted design has four main components- find more information at the link.

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Infographic: The United Bike Lanes of America

Infographic: The United Bike Lanes of America | green streets | Scoop.it
When you think of a road trip across America, you probably envision zooming in a car along endless scenic highways and freeway overpasses. But take a closer look and across the country, there are thousands of miles of bike lanes connecting us from city to city and even coast to coast.

Within urban areas, more people are traveling to work or running errands on two wheels thanks to safer and more well-designed bike routes. Whether people are using them for work, exercise, vacation, or just a leisurely Sunday afternoon backcountry ride, bike lanes are thriving as thoroughfares in our bike nation.

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Do Bike Paths Promote Bike Riding?

Do Bike Paths Promote Bike Riding? | green streets | Scoop.it

The "fundamental law of road congestion" tells us that building roads creates traffic. There's such a latent demand for space on the highway that no sooner does it appear than it's filled. But whether or not a similar law applies to bike paths and bike lanes remains a mystery.

A recent study of Seattle residents found that those living near bike paths had an increased likelihood of riding, but saw no effect for bike lanes. Then again, a study in Minneapolis reached the opposite conclusion. Some recent work has found no connection between bike lanes and ridership levels at all. In short, the research picture is far from settled...

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How the Dutch Got Their Bike Paths

How the Dutch Got Their Bike Paths | green streets | Scoop.it
What The Netherlands can teach us about child safety and mass protests as effective policy-benders.

This fascinating short documentary traces the rise of The Netherlands’ famous bicycle paths and examines the sociocultural factors that enabled it, from mass protests to government policy. A living testament to the “build it and they will come” ethos, these safe cycling paths not only vastly improved the city’s traffic system efficiency, but they also helped address an oil and economic crisis, lower carbon emissions, and reduce child casualties by 350%, all thanks to intelligent and focused policy decisions — something to think about as we head into an election year in the tragically car-centric U.S...

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Wheely thankful...

Wheely thankful... | green streets | Scoop.it
This Thanksgiving, Elly Blue finds a whole bike basket full of things to be grateful for.

In last Sunday's New York Times, columnist Mark Bittman compiled a list of people and things in the food movement he's thankful for. The bicycle movement deserves its own list...

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Are Your Streets "Complete?"

Are Your Streets "Complete?" | green streets | Scoop.it
Streets should be designed for everyone -- not just cars.

There's an urban planning term growing in popularity called complete streets. It's considered a natural complement to sustainability efforts because it calms traffic (thus saving fuel) and encourages the planting of trees (cutting CO2). It's basically the notion that our sidewalks, streets, and crosswalks are shared, not the province of one group over the other.

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10 things that make a great green city

10 things that make a great green city | green streets | Scoop.it
From bike lanes to smart energy policies, check out what makes a truly green city and decide how your town stacks up.

Via Flora Moon
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Urban Design for Bicycles: a Plausible Sustainable Solution

Urban Design for Bicycles: a Plausible Sustainable Solution | green streets | Scoop.it

Using bicycle-friendly cities like Copenhagen as inspiration, a growing number of cities around the world are changing their urban design to become biking cities.


Each year, Copenhagen eliminates 90,000 tons of CO2 emissions from entering the atmosphere from the sheer number of cyclists versus cars.

Designing cities with bicycles in mind reduces emissions, commute times, urban sprawl and illness. More cities are looking to bike-friendly sustainable development as they aspire to become green.

Urban planners and architects are increasingly faced with the challenge of compacting development and designing a sustainable transport pattern...

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, February 15, 2013 11:46 AM

The photo is Amsterdam...the story is the same....

Etienne Randier's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:21 AM

A la fin des années 60, Georges Pompidou déclarait que Paris devait s'adapter à l'automobile, revenus de cette hérésie, les urbanistes planchent désormais sur la création d'un cadre de vie conçu pour le bien-être des humains et non celui des machines.

 

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Complete Streets: One Size Does Not Fit All « Project for Public Spaces

Complete Streets: One Size Does Not Fit All « Project for Public Spaces | green streets | Scoop.it

Last month Gary Toth spoke at the Complete Streets Forum in Toronto about the symbiotic relationship between the Complete Streets and Placemaking movements. Early on in the talk, posted above in full, Gary points out that a complete street makes travel “safe, comfortable, and convenient” for all modes–but that doesn’t necessarily mean that it overtly provides for each one in its own area. Complete streets can often include flexible or mixed-mode areas (Salt Lake City’s green lanes are a great example), but the focus should be on creating a street that is welcoming to everyone, no matter the mode of travel.

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Swedish Cities Close to Building a Bicycle Superhighway

Swedish Cities Close to Building a Bicycle Superhighway | green streets | Scoop.it
Sweden’s transportation authority, Trafikverket, has approved a four line bicycle superhighway between Malmö and nearby Lund.

With all the handwringing over aging infrastructure, rising energy costs, high speed rail and other public transportation projects that are spiraling in costs, cities and towns could look at solutions that can improve mobility and do not the bust the budget: bicycles and bicycle paths.

Studies have suggested that building bicycle paths can have a sizable economic impact especially when you look at the job-per-dollar ratio. To that end, towns and cities preoccupied with trying to improve their citizens’ quality of life and address metrics like their carbon footprint should take a look at what cities in southern Sweden are planning to improve their local transportation systems...

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Zen and the art of urban transportation

Zen and the art of urban transportation | green streets | Scoop.it
Chicago's new bike riding, car loving, yoga practicing transportation commissioner thinks he can create a New Way of getting around in a city built for the automobile. Can he keep the peace in the process?

After Emanuel won the election, his choice of Klein made it clear the mayor-elect was serious about sustainable transportation. The new commissioner was fresh from a stint as transportation director for Washington, D.C., where in a mere 23 months, he made numerous pedestrian safety improvements, launched a new streetcar system, expanded the downtown circulator bus system, piloted protected bike lanes, and created the nation's first and largest bike share system...

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NACTO’s New Urban Bikeway Design Guide

NACTO’s New Urban Bikeway Design Guide | green streets | Scoop.it

In an effort to create Complete Streets that are also safer for bicyclists, the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) announced the release of a new Urban Design Bikeway Guide last week. At the report launch, Janette Sadik-Khan, NACTO president and NYC Transportation Commissioner, Ray LaHood, U.S. Transportation Secretary, and Congressman Earl Blumenauer all emphasized that smart bicycle infrastructure design can not only make roadways safer for all, but can also boost economic growth.

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People v Cars: The 20th Century Battle over Cities

People v Cars: The 20th Century Battle over Cities | green streets | Scoop.it

We meet here at the “Towards Carfree Cities Conference” to address how cities are designed, with an overriding interest in redefining what is proper and customary with respect to how streets are used. Part of the emergence of social movements in cities around the world to contest the car, whether bicycling, pedestrians, or street closures, is in response to the seeming inevitability of cars dominating our public space. But automobiles didn’t always fill our streets.

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