green streets
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green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
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No Room to Play in Cities?

No Room to Play in Cities? | green streets | Scoop.it

A report published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health found school-aged children in high-density, well-connected neighborhoods are less likely to be physically active out of school. The study looked at physical activity patterns of children, 11 to 15 years old.

The findings point to the relationship and influence of our surrounding landscape on our daily behavior. They also point out the differing and conflicting ways our environment can affect adults and children.

“Studies have shown that areas like the Webbs’, with well-connected streets and a high density of intersections, promote exercise among adults, who are more likely to walk or cycle to work or the green grocer,” ParentCentral reports. The article also reports that the connectivity that encourages active transportation in adults has the opposite effect on children.

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Gary Hustwit, Director Of "Urbanized," On Solving America's Big-City Problems

Gary Hustwit, Director Of "Urbanized," On Solving America's Big-City Problems | green streets | Scoop.it

Hustwit categorizes U.S. cities as “bad, really bad.” His proposed solution: a mix of good design, apolitical vision, and civic engagement.
Perhaps your thoughts upon leaving the house each day don’t immediately turn to the design of your urban environment and how it affects your life in the smallest and largest possible ways. You may also not be aware of how your daily choices end up, in effect, designing your city...

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Where the Sidewalk Ends: How Our Neighborhoods Affect the Way We Move

Where the Sidewalk Ends: How Our Neighborhoods Affect the Way We Move | green streets | Scoop.it
Environmental factors could have a big influence on how often we get off our butts.

Published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, a new study examines how environmental factors—including crime rates, sidewalks, proximity to local businesses, and access to recreational facilities—change the way we walk, bike, and run.

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Removing Signals and Signs from Intersections Just Might Make Us Safer

Removing Signals and Signs from Intersections Just Might Make Us Safer | green streets | Scoop.it
The Shared Spaces theory has started to catch on in Europe, but will Americans ever buy it?

The concept: Remove all the traffic lights, signs, curbs and lane markings from roads, and people will share them more effectively. 

Drivers, bikers and pedestrians will make eye contact with one another. They’ll cooperate. They’ll move through public space with a greater sense of its communal utility. In Europe, the result has proven to be safer and more efficient – and more social – for everyone involved.

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New data show how transit corridors reduce traffic, increase walking | Kaid Benfield's Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC

New data show how transit corridors reduce traffic, increase walking | Kaid Benfield's Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC | green streets | Scoop.it
  New data from Arlington County, Virginia, provide an in-depth look at how a jurisdiction known for great planning has leveraged excellent transit service and transit-oriented development into efficient transportation performance.  Arlington, just...
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Why Ordinary Urban Experiences Motivate Change

Why Ordinary Urban Experiences Motivate Change | green streets | Scoop.it

Immersion in the real look and feel (and sometimes sound and smell) of a more compact and sustainable local experience can feed arguments for change, justify expenditures or tell how to cast a strategic election vote. Personal involvement is the most powerful and verifiable way to champion the city cause, over and above mere acceptance of empirical data, article prose and illustrations...

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Why Placemaking Requires Passion Even More Than Big Budgets

Why Placemaking Requires Passion Even More Than Big Budgets | green streets | Scoop.it

Minneapolis-based writer Michelle Bruch examines how public input helps the bottom line as much as it helps build places where people want to be.

 

Placemaking is designed to create a vision that is much more practical than a pretty architectural rendering.

"The voices of the people are significant anchors," says Fred Kent, president of the New York-based Project for Public Spaces (PPS), a nonprofit that consults with cities on how to create strong public spaces. "It creates places that are meaningful to them."

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Place Pulse: ‘Hot Or Not’ For Cities

Place Pulse: ‘Hot Or Not’ For Cities | green streets | Scoop.it

Which elements affect people’s perception of urban space? This is what MIT Media Lab and Macro Connections try to find out with the online project Place Pulse. The website, which actually functions like a ‘Hot or Not’ for cities, aims to gain a greater understanding of the collective processes that potentially create the perceptions we have of cities.

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In bicycle friendly D.C., going car-free is increasingly common

In bicycle friendly D.C., going car-free is increasingly common | green streets | Scoop.it
More than a quarter of all District households don’t own vehicles, compared with 6 percent of households region wide.

A third of people who have lived in the District for less than a decade described themselves as Zipcar users, a Washington Post survey found, and they’re also most likely to cruise around town on the red bicycles offered by the Capital Bikeshare program.

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Why Apple’s ascension to world’s largest company is great for cities | SmartPlanet

Is there any more potent a symbol of our civilization’s shift away from oil dependency and sprawl than a mobile devices company growing larger..?

As young people turn away from cars — a phenomenon so powerful that it has had the marketing departments of car companies running scared for years — they are left with no other option than mass transit, and that means increased density, urbanism, walkability and everything else required to bring our way of life in line with planetary boundaries.

Millennials aren’t just fleeing the automobile; they’re also explicitly fleeing McMansions and the suburbs. As S. Mitra Kalita and Robbie Whelan reported in the Wall Street Journal:

Gen Y housing preferences are the subject of at least two panels at this week’s convention. A key finding: They want to walk everywhere. Surveys show that 13% carpool to work, while 7% walk, said Melina Duggal, a principal with Orlando-based real estate adviser RCLCO. A whopping 88% want to be in an urban setting, but since cities themselves can be so expensive, places with shopping, dining and transit such as Bethesda and Arlington in the Washington suburbs will do just fine.

The ascension of Apple, a company in the vanguard of firms that make devices you don’t need until you have one and become hopelessly addicted, literally represents a wealth transfer from the old economy — cars, oil, long commutes — to a new one built on a desire to capitalize on virtual connectivity by recapitulating it in the real world. The mechanism of this wealth transfer are consumers themselves, who are making decisions every day to buy an iPad instead of a new car, or to move closer to work so that they don’t have to drive at all.

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